#11  
Old 05-30-2011, 07:00 PM
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Default Re: Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick

Hi Ben

It sounds like you are going to make your deck and slab part of the same structure. I would recommend against this. For a start it is not a good idea to have concrete right up against your deck structure. Plus if ever you need to replace a part of your deck (due to termites, rot, change of plans etc) it will be very difficult.

I would finish the deck structure off now by putting a bearer across the 3 cut-off joists and then concrete in a metal stand under each inside corner – where the new bearer meets the 2 existing joists that you haven’t cut. Just dig a bit of a hole for a footing under each, attach the stand to the bearer so the post sits in the hole and then fill with concrete around the post. Then the deck would be self supporting.

Then I would form up the concrete and leave a gap between the slab and the deck. You will need a gap to get the form work out. I would make sure those three joists are cut to the right length so that when you put your deck back it just overhangs the new bearer – so you won’t really see the gap. The same goes for the deck at the sides of the slab – just overhang it a little to cover the gap a bit.

Please note, I am not a builder but I have had a bit of experience building decks in the past.
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  #12  
Old 05-31-2011, 04:19 AM
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Default Re: Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick

Thanks Doug. I like things to be over-engineered (I am an engineer after all!) It's the way things should be!

Oooh, good point Sharkey. A gap between the decking substructure and the foundation slab probably would be good, particularly if I wanted to change something going forward. The difficult I have though is the ground directly underneath the three cut-off joists is slightly soft, in fact I've spent a fair bit of time and effort trying to dry out and compact the dirt in that area, with moderate success. The ground slightly closer to the fenceline is pretty solid, so I figure if I use treated pine as sacrificial formwork that remains bolted to the slab (in much the same way my carpenter dyna-bolted the treated pine substructure to the brick wall of my house) and I used the bulk footing of the slab as the support for the substructure, the slab should be able to take the load and I should be ok. I think you're spot on though, when the timber eventually rots I am going to have a rad old time replacing it... Ah well, hopefully I'll have sold my house to someone willing to pay top dollar for a unit with a WFO by that time!
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  #13  
Old 05-31-2011, 04:28 AM
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Default Re: Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick

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Originally Posted by Karangi Dude View Post

See my build.

Cheers Doug
By the way Doug, I think I spent about half an hour going through your oven photo albums last night. Awesome. I'm planning a slightly different enclosure, but I want my vent to look just like yours. I think I may be suffering from 'vent envy' if indeed there is such a thing
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  #14  
Old 05-31-2011, 04:53 AM
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Default Re: Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick

Thanks Doug,

I will definitely hit you up for some advice, particularly when it comes time to tie the dome into the vent arch. I saw your work there and I'll be chasing you up when the time comes, don't you worry!

Cheers, Ben
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  #15  
Old 06-18-2011, 01:58 AM
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Default Re: Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick

OK, so I formed up the foundation slab and threw in some crushed Class 2 rock (donated by my friendly neighbor Dave) and gave it a good compacting with the whacker plate from Bunnings. Dave and I have been splitting the costs on all of the materials and equipment, as we're building our ovens in-sync. Brilliant. And economical!

To hire the whacker plate for myself would have been way too expensive - I'm only compacting 2 square meters for crying out loud! But when we split the cost it was affordable. I highly recommend getting your neighbour on board - it's great fun, saves money, and you get to know them over a beer and a concrete pour. Good to have some extra labour too!

Anyway, I decided to use the WFO foundation as the new support for the decking, with sacrificial treated pine formwork on the deck side of the slab (see photos). I put in some reo mesh donated by a friendly concreter up the road, along with some N12 rebar leftover from the construction site I work at, and I was ready for some concrete. As previously mentioned, the galvanised bolts are there to bolt the treated pine formwork to the cured concrete foundation.
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Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick-foundation-formed-up.jpeg   Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick-foundation-formwork-reo.jpeg   Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick-decking-support-bolts.jpeg   Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick-new-decking-bearers.jpeg  
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  #16  
Old 06-18-2011, 02:07 AM
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Default Re: Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick

Quote:
Originally Posted by benguilford View Post
so I formed up the foundation slab and threw in some crushed Class 2 rock and gave it a good compacting with the whacker plate from Bunnings.
Totally unnecessary in Melbourne as we dont have great frosts or great movement of ground.

Also make sure you take out the broken bricks that are holding up the rio as they form weak points in the slab.
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  #17  
Old 06-18-2011, 02:16 AM
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Default Re: Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick

Ben, When you are building the stand, consider a side entry for the wood storage as it appears that your deck will go right up to the stand. Hot coals dropping into your wood storage can be a problem. A piece of alum. checkerboard screwed onto the deck below the entry is also a good plan.
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  #18  
Old 06-18-2011, 02:33 AM
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Default Re: Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick

Hi David,

I am planning on running the decking right up around the stand, and the checkerboard sounds like a plan. The last thing I want to do is burn my house down, my wife would frown upon that. I'd like to keep the woodpile in the front though, but I'm planning a smaller than normal storage area potentially with doors.

Thanks for the advice Brickie, I've actually already poured the foundation! (that's the next post coming through, I didn't want to do the full update in one huge post) and the bricks are there to ensure I maintain cover to the reinforcement. In terms of compressive strength the brick might be slightly lower than the surrounding concrete, but not by so much that they'd be a problem. I'd rather have them in there to keep the reo off the ground than not have them at all (I was too lazy to get some plastic bar-chairs from the construction site, and I figured at 225mm thick the strength of the foundation wasn't going to be an issue).
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Old 06-18-2011, 02:40 AM
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Default Re: Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick

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Originally Posted by benguilford View Post
but not by so much that they'd be a problem. .
Too late now but they create cracking points in the slab, thats why they invented chairs.
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  #20  
Old 06-18-2011, 03:08 AM
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Default Re: Ben's Brick Oven in Berwick

Ben,
All you have to do is remove them as you go and pull the reo up into the centre of the slab.
Sorry, I see you've already poured.

Last edited by david s; 06-18-2011 at 03:12 AM.
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