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  #11  
Old 08-10-2013, 02:43 AM
brickie in oz's Avatar
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Default Re: ~38" build in Seattle

I see from the pics you are using an "Indispensable Tool".

By using the arc of the tool you should be able to work out the oven opening arch to dome height, use some cardboard to scribe it on, it will help to visualise how things should go.
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  #12  
Old 08-10-2013, 11:50 AM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: ~38" build in Seattle

OK, I rebuilt things a little bit, since I'm still too dense to quite understand.

I think I want the arch bricks cut like the last picture, with 3-4" of flat top. The third picture has such a narrow wedge of brick on the inside that it seems likely to chip, and no flat spot on top unless I make it pretty long.

I don't think I can move the oven any closer to the front of the hearth without having to make some significant modifications to the roof above it for chimney clearance. With a 10" OD double wall chimney + minimum 2" clearance, I may already have to shave a bit off the roof. That's the correct size chimney, right?

I've also included a picture of my makeshift saw stand. A random piece of steel I picked up from work that had been part of a shipping crate for lab benches plus 4 casters and some scrap plywood and 2x. There's enough table behind the saw to hold a bucket of clean water for the pump. I cut a hole in the plywood under the drain plug, so when the tray fills up, I can rest a bucket on the 2x chunks in front, drain the water in there, and water my landscaping with dusty water.

I know I need to put some shims under my arch form, and make it plumb and a bit more stable. Any other advice before I start mixing mortar?
Attached Thumbnails
~38" build in Seattle-img_5039.jpg   ~38" build in Seattle-img_5040.jpg   ~38" build in Seattle-img_5041.jpg   ~38" build in Seattle-img_5043.jpg  
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  #13  
Old 08-10-2013, 01:04 PM
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Default Re: ~38" build in Seattle

Pluscwc,
What kind of firebrick are you using. The color has me concerned. I have removed brick that looked similar to those from behind the firebrick of old coal fired fireplaces. The brick I have were used as a type of insulated firebrick brick. They are heavier than most insulated firebrick sold nowadays, but not near as heavy as a medium density firebrick. This subject came up a year or so ago on somebody's build. I still have a pic that I posted on that thread back then. Sorry,but I can't remember the thread.

The bricks on the left are what I am referring to.



I hope that I am wrong.
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  #14  
Old 08-10-2013, 01:51 PM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: ~38" build in Seattle

Well, I checked the density before I picked them up and I thought it was alright. I just reran the numbers:

Mutual Materials standard firebrick:
9 x 4.5 x 2", 6.875 lbs
14.727 cubic inches per pound

My reclaimed brick:
8 x 3.75 x 2.75", 4.75 lbs
17.368 cubic inches per pound

If you molded my brick into a standard firebrick shape, it would weigh 5.6 lbs. It's about 18.5% less dense than the standard firebrick. I thought it was closer than that, so I'm glad you pointed it out and I checked.

Other than density, how can I test it? Build a drystack mini oven and put a fire in it? Any tests for abrasion/spalling problems?
Lower density will mean what? Lower heat capacity and retention, maybe more fragile?

I don't mind buying more brick if this is a concern, I'd rather build once and the brick doesn't drive the total build cost that much.
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  #15  
Old 08-10-2013, 02:37 PM
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Default Re: ~38" build in Seattle

Plus,

See if this helps with visualizing a tapered arch and helping you with the arch placement. http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/8/oc...tml#post111125 (OctoForno)
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  #16  
Old 08-10-2013, 02:47 PM
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Default Re: ~38" build in Seattle

One more pic from my build showing how the IT helps set the intersect between the arch and dome arc.
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~38" build in Seattle-32b-inner-arch-6.15.12.jpg  
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  #17  
Old 08-10-2013, 03:02 PM
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Default Re: ~38" build in Seattle

I came in for a break and saw your reply. I went back out for a test on the brick that I have. I took one of my old trials and was able to half one of them with two strikes on one side. I did the same test on a medium density firebrick left over from my dome. I pretty much had to mark it all the way around, three strikes each, before it broke. I was easily able scratch a 1/4" trench in the old brick of mine with a the claw end of a hammer. The medium duty firebrick just sharpened the claw.
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  #18  
Old 08-10-2013, 03:49 PM
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Default Re: ~38" build in Seattle

Quote:
Originally Posted by pluscwc View Post
Any other advice before I start mixing mortar?
Your arch profile is too far forwards, you will end up with a tear drop shaped roof in the oven. ( the oven will still work ok though)
Try moving the profile back into the oven more.
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  #19  
Old 08-10-2013, 04:05 PM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: ~38" build in Seattle

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gulf View Post
I came in for a break and saw your reply. I went back out for a test on the brick that I have. I took one of my old trials and was able to half one of them with two strikes on one side. I did the same test on a medium density firebrick left over from my dome. I pretty much had to mark it all the way around, three strikes each, before it broke. I was easily able scratch a 1/4" trench in the old brick of mine with a the claw end of a hammer. The medium duty firebrick just sharpened the claw.
You apparently have better firebrick than up here in the Pacific Northwest. I could scratch a thin track in both types of brick with the corner of a claw hammer. It was easier to split the standard firebrick than my mysterious firebrick-like substance.

I took a MAPP torch to one side of a sample brick, but I didn't want to deal with how long it would take to get up to temperature, since I don't have a thermometer than can read high enough. Maybe next time I fire up the grill, I'll through one in.
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  #20  
Old 08-10-2013, 04:59 PM
Peasant
 
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Location: puget sound, wa
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Default Re: ~38" build in Seattle

Quote:
Originally Posted by brickie in oz View Post
Your arch profile is too far forwards, you will end up with a tear drop shaped roof in the oven. ( the oven will still work ok though)
Try moving the profile back into the oven more.
I don't understand that. The shape of the roof of the oven should be defined by the IT and if I make each run level or not. Or how else I screw things up.

My arch template is defining the forward edge of the arch. The back edge(s) of the arch is defined by the IT. Looking at the arch brick, these are the two rightmost faces. The upper face should be radial from the center point, the lower face should be perpendicular to that one, in the same plane as the inside of the oven. I can change where that is a little bit, but if I push it further back into the oven, I will need to make the arch taller to get it tangent with the interior of the dome. Without changing the template height, I can move the template back only as far as the bottom of the piece currently shown, which does nothing to the arch or dome geometry. It's just an artifact of having a template that is too thin.
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~38" build in Seattle-img_5043_2.jpg  

Last edited by pluscwc; 08-10-2013 at 05:08 PM.
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