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  #191  
Old 05-21-2013, 12:27 PM
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Default Re: 36" Pompeii in DC

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanoer54 View Post
a dryer is a good source of free metal and less to haul out of your basement. if you do decide to use your dryer door, it would be a good idea to grind off all of the baked enamel paint before you start bending and fabrication. i think the baked enamel is only on the outside. the inside is usually just a primer or lesser grade baked enamel. but otherwise a free source of good metal.

on the stove door idea, i have an ancient self cleaning oven with a SS door and was thinking about re-using the door and glass for a WFO door but not sure of the temperature aspect. i know the self cleaning feature heats up to around 650F or so, but not sure it would work on a WFO door. any thoughts or ideas from anyone?

( i have been following this site for a couple months and am working on acquiring all the materials, IT, wet saw with miter, arch templates, etc. Have been working on the plans and am really anxious to get started in the next couple weeks.)
Hi Canoe,

If it's a self cleaning oven door, it might be insulated, how thick is it. Post photos.
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  #192  
Old 05-22-2013, 04:48 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: illinois
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Default Re: 36" Pompeii in DC

without tearing it apart to measure, it appears to be about 1 to 1-1/8 inch thick. i really like your pyrex lid idea. i will keep that in mind when i am to the door build. that looks like the way to go. i hope to start my WFO in the next week or so and as a newbie will be asking lots of questions.
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  #193  
Old 05-22-2013, 04:53 AM
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Default Re: 36" Pompeii in DC

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanoer54 View Post
without tearing it apart to measure, it appears to be about 1 to 1-1/8 inch thick. i really like your pyrex lid idea. i will keep that in mind when i am to the door build. that looks like the way to go. i hope to start my WFO in the next week or so and as a newbie will be asking lots of questions.
Jon,

There is a string I started about this window door at

http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f28/...oor-18303.html (Window for Oven Door)

Feel free to go there for additional details.

Chip
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  #194  
Old 05-22-2013, 06:38 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 198
Default Re: 36" Pompeii in DC

Well, decided to order a 2x2 sheet of 14ga mild steel from OnlineMetals. The shipping is more than the metal, but it's still not too bad. Cutting apart the dryer door and grinding off the paint seemed like too much work, and I just don't have time for any of the other (surely effective) scrounging methods. I'll make a new inner face for the door, and at least a "collar" of sorts to protect the lip of my wood face from any more burning.
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  #195  
Old 05-22-2013, 09:32 AM
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Default Re: 36" Pompeii in DC

chip, thanks for the string. great information. also saw a string on '2 ways not to build a door' which had good information also. I'm a ways from needing a door but will bookmark these strings.
thanks...jon
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  #196  
Old 05-26-2013, 02:42 PM
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Default Re: 36" Pompeii in DC

I'm starting to think about tiling the exterior of my dome. I was originally thinking of doing a mosaic design, with some trepidation as I have very little artistic talent. Then I happened across some very nice looking slate tile while wandering through my local home depot. Mosaic artistry may be beyond me, but fitting rectangles onto a hemisphere is more within my power. The only question is how to put them on, and whether they will stand up to the weather.

In principle, slate ought to be impermeable enough to be frost resistant. In practice, many slate tiles seem to be rather more absorbant, I guess because they are actually shale or quartzite? I picked up a 4-pack of tiles this weekend and tested them by soaking in a pan of water. One tile absorbed less than .2% of its weight in water. Another, which seemed to have pocked areas on the underside, absorbed more like 1-1.2%. The standard for exterior tile seems to be .3-1%. I'm thinking this may be close enough. Worst case scenario, they're cheap, and easy to replace if one pops off.

Questions: Would it be possible and desirable to lay the slate tiles in an overlapping manner, much like slate shingles? See attached pictures.

Also, I have never worked with thinset before. Do I need to make the surface flatter before tiling (e.g., by applying another coat of stucco?). How big of a tile can I reasonably apply? (I'm fairly sure that the 6" tiles in the picture would be too large).

Still waiting for my steel to arrive, and hoping the existing door doesn't crumble or burst into flames in the meanwhile...
Attached Thumbnails
36" Pompeii in DC-img_7830.jpg   36" Pompeii in DC-img_7831.jpg  
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  #197  
Old 05-26-2013, 06:03 PM
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Default Re: 36" Pompeii in DC

RSandler,
The 6" tiles look great. I am not sure about overlapping them, maybe someone else can comment. It would be interesting to see it done. But even if they are, I think that 6" is too large for the size of your dome. The finished exterior of my 44" was able to accept a 2 3/8" X 4" brick splits with a little extra buttering on the bricks near the head joints.
I don't understand "flattening out"? The dome will be a compound curve. Maximizing the cuts from the stock that is used is what most people try to do. 6" X 6" will yield 2" X 3" tiles (minus the saw cuts). Note: your tiles may already be a little less that 6" X 6". Again, I'm not sure about the overlapping but, I think they would look great, and would mimic brick. That is, if they were laid to look like brick. You can still use the tile method on the compound curve. I used Old Chicago floor splits. But, I used the tile method with spacers to install them.
You can use a sealer on the joints, if you are wanting to make it as waterproof as possible. That is, if you are intending on installing some type of vent at the apex. The copper chapiter makes me think that it is being considered. If you overlap, I would cut the stock to 3" X 3".
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Last edited by Gulf; 05-26-2013 at 06:17 PM.
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  #198  
Old 05-27-2013, 06:02 PM
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Default Re: 36" Pompeii in DC

Gulf,

Thanks for the comment. The slate tiles do look pretty--just have to hope they don't chip, spall and pop off in the winter here.

Re: flatter. I used the wrong word there, but I think you answered my question anyway. I didn't mean flatter but rather "smoother". Unlike more talented builder like yourself, my render coat is a little craggy in places, with lips of maybe 1/8" at most. But, like you say, the dome is a compound curve, and if little 1/8" lips will cause a problem, the whole endeavor is probably doomed. Given that you and CobblerDave and others have pulled off the brick/tile facing approach, it will likely work fine for me, crags and all. Plus or minus my own clutzyness, that is

-Ryan
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  #199  
Old 06-08-2013, 11:24 AM
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Default Re: 36" Pompeii in DC

Re-built my door last week. Still would be nicer to have a 4 inch thick, stainless door like Chip, but I think this will hold up for awhile.

The construction is now: Wood, steel, cement board (to allow me to screw into the wood), insulation, then more steel. Also stained and put a coat of polyurethane on the wood, to make it easier to clean it when it gets soot on it (also makes the soot less noticeable )

The picture of the back shows some rust forming on the outer piece of steel, I think resulting from the load of firewood that I dried out following the door's inaugural use. Should I be worried about this, and try to buff it off with steel wool, or leave it be?

Other question, for Gulf or others: Do you think that 4"x4" tiles would work on the dome? Home depot sells those same slate tiles in a package of 9 4"x4" tiles. It costs about $0.75 more per square foot, but it might be worth it to avoid having to make hundreds of cuts with the brick saw.
Attached Thumbnails
36" Pompeii in DC-img_7845.jpg   36" Pompeii in DC-img_7847.jpg   36" Pompeii in DC-img_7848.jpg   36" Pompeii in DC-img_7850.jpg   36" Pompeii in DC-img_7851.jpg  

36" Pompeii in DC-img_7852.jpg  
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  #200  
Old 06-08-2013, 12:18 PM
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Default Re: 36" Pompeii in DC

Ryan,
The rebuild on the door looks great! It ought to last you a long while.

Quote:
Original quote by rsandler:........Other question, for Gulf or others: Do you think that 4"x4" tiles would work on the dome? Home depot sells those same slate tiles in a package of 9 4"x4" tiles. It costs about $0.75 more per square foot, but it might be worth it to avoid having to make hundreds of cuts with the brick saw.
They should work alright, as far as the curve of the dome is concerned. However, the extra height of the tile is going to add a lot to the "upside down v's" . You will probably be trimming your tiles to accommodate this even if you use the smaller tiles cut from larger stock.

I used a 3/8" X 3/8" notched trial to apply the thin-set to the back of each brick. I buttered them a little heaver at the head joints. You will probably need to do that for the bed joints as well, if you go with 4" X 4" tiles.

Decisions, decisions......
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