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-   -   Drilling a hole in Casa2G 110 for gas line - issues? (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f7/drilling-hole-casa2g-110-gas-line-13119.html)

leslys 05-30-2010 01:51 PM

Drilling a hole in Casa2G 110 for gas line - issues?
 
Hi,

I just received my Casa2G 110 and very excited to get started building it.

My husband has an idea to drill a hole through the side of the oven and insert a natural gas line for us to use to start the fire a lot more easily. We have something similar in our wood fireplace. But I am not sure if this will cause any problems.

Anyone know if this will cause any issues with the insulation or cracking of the oven pieces?

Lesly

james 06-02-2010 11:42 AM

Re: Drilling a hole in Casa2G 110 for gas line - issues?
 
Hi leslys,

We recommend strongly against using a gas burner or fire starter in a brick oven. The key difference between a brick oven and fireplace is that a fireplace has the vent/chimney inside the firebox -- where any small gas leak in the burner can escape. A brick oven has the vent/chimney outside of the oven chamber (above the door opening), so that there is nowhere for gas to go. A small gas leak would pool in the top of the oven dome, where it can explode when ignited.

I think this is a risk that just isn't worth taking.

Besides, becoming a master fire builder is half the fun of a brick oven! :-)

James

Buxtonator 06-02-2010 11:18 PM

Re: Drilling a hole in Casa2G 110 for gas line - issues?
 
Hi James,

I am almost in tears.

Due to some rather strange city bylaws, I've just discovered residents are allowed a fire fueled barbeque/grill, but are not allowed a pizza oven as it uses open fire. I am a rule follower.

Is there any way of heating the oven with gas, or is it just a big bad accident waiting to happen?

Luke

texassourdough 06-03-2010 06:21 AM

Re: Drilling a hole in Casa2G 110 for gas line - issues?
 
Hi Luke!

I suggest you reread James' response to Lesly! His warning is pretty explicit and clear.

Burning natural gas in a contained space with limited airflow invites multiple problems. As does operation in a (nominally) 1000 degree oven (while heating). Conventional burners don't get very hot for they are below the fire and heat. In an oven they are surrounded. It is also worth noting that heat loading the hearth is impared in a gas oven for the only heat reaching the hearth is radiant heat from the dome and flame (and you have cool air from the door flowing across the hearth to help remove the heat. The commercial pizza ovens I have seen that use gas are invariably well below proper temperature for a WFO and pizza quality suffers.

Good luck!
Jay

christo 06-04-2010 05:23 PM

Re: Drilling a hole in Casa2G 110 for gas line - issues?
 
Fire starting will get easier (disclaimer - I am a eagle scout)
it really does get easier. .. The "top down" method has become my favorite.

In addition, wood adds a distinct flavor to your pies and breads that natural gas cannot.

It is inconvient to haul wood but in my experience totally worth it.

Christo

100million 06-09-2010 07:22 PM

Re: Drilling a hole in Casa2G 110 for gas line - issues?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by christo (Post 91521)
Fire starting will get easier (disclaimer - I am a eagle scout)
it really does get easier. .. The "top down" method has become my favorite.

In addition, wood adds a distinct flavor to your pies I dont believe this....The Reason why is.... because I have brought my oven over to a friend house that has WFO and mine is Propane, we used my dough and sauce and cheese and you if there was a different flavor it was very hard to tell,,,, I believe it is because the pie is only in the oven 60-90 seconds and about breads about the roasting of meat for a length of time I do believe that you will get a different flavor, and about bread you pull all the fire out of the oven before you put the bread and close the door,,,, so I am not sure about this method adding flavor but remember I only cook Pies and if I am wrong I am sorry. I have never tested Bread or Roast or meat that natural gas cannot.

It is inconvient to haul wood but in my experience totally worth it.

Christo

Have you ever cooked in a propane oven?

This is Just my two Cents,,,, I wrote in Red Font and Really if we dont test side by side we will never know the different

texassourdough 06-10-2010 07:02 AM

Re: Drilling a hole in Casa2G 110 for gas line - issues?
 
Hi Chris!

I fully agree radiant is radiant but I think there is a very different heat loading process involved with glowing coals on the hearth (and also recognize that ash is an impairer of hearth heatings so it isn't as simple as I alluded. Oven management is a real issue for all WFO style ovens IF you want to make the best pies. There is certainly nothing that should prevent a gas fired oven doing well and being more controllable IF properly managed. Recent experience with three pizzarias that use gas have left me unenthused about gas for the hearths were clearly too cold (dome somewhat cool too and that is probably a big clue that they were improperly loaded and managed). I do not have personal experience managing a gas oven and could be wrong, but I tend to thing coals help charge the hearth but...

WRT taste, differences between wood and gas should be minimal for at proper temp the organics should be fully oxidized and ash in a clean oven should be minimal. I don't question that people think there is a difference but I question that blind taste comparisons on well managed ovens would be easily distinguished though I can certainly envision a cool oven (below 750-800 and emitting smoke - though the air flow patterns will tend to make it difficult for the smoke to get to a pizza so???) giving pizza some flavor, or excess ash, or a poorly cleaned closed oven (having residual charcoal) flavoring bread or other items.

As we all agree, there can definitely be a safety issue and I would suggest that IF one is to use gas they should not skimp on the burner or valving. (And disconnecting the gas when not in use might be a smart idea to minimize pooling in the dome.)

Thanks for the comments!
Jay


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