#11  
Old 04-11-2008, 10:17 AM
beaglestorm's Avatar
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Default Re: Tile saw question-

A drop saw... is that like a miter saw that is used normally for wood? Or a chop saw that is used for cutting steel? The advice I have seen says the dust from the brick will quickly wear out pretty much any saw not designed to seal out all that fine abrasive dust. Even when you soak the brick, the center will kick up some dust. I would not use a high end or expensive brand new saw that is not designed for tile/brick. However, if it is an old drop saw that you can risk destroying you could give it a shot.
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  #12  
Old 04-11-2008, 08:34 PM
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Default Re: Tile saw question-

I ended up buying the HF 10" saw afterall. I found one at the HF fresno store for $199. It has been working like a champ!
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  #13  
Old 04-11-2008, 10:30 PM
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Default Re: Tile saw question-

Good choice. Make life easy. Sell it when you're done on ebay.
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  #14  
Old 04-12-2008, 05:16 AM
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Default Re: Tile saw question-

Gang,

I bought the HF 14" "dry" chop saw for $59. So far I've made about 40 cuts... It does KICK UP the dust. I figure if If I can make it through my project I should be okay.

Dick

Assuming it makes it through the whole project it might be an option. You definitely need to use it outside.
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  #15  
Old 04-12-2008, 06:22 AM
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Default Re: Tile saw question-

Badger
Make sure you wear a respirator dust mask...as good a one you can get your hands on...lots of silica in bricks and silicosis is not a good thing at all...soak the bricks a while and it will cut down on the dust a bit
Dutch
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  #16  
Old 04-12-2008, 06:46 AM
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Default Re: Tile saw question-

Dutchoven,

Thanks - exactly what I'm doing. I borrowed one of those "canister" types from my brother.

Last night it was real windy so the dust was blowing away.

Dick
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  #17  
Old 04-14-2008, 04:53 AM
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Location: Australia
Posts: 73
Default Re: Tile saw question-

Thanks for the info guys I will ask the question in reverse now. If I by a tile/brick saw that operates as a drop saw but for the purpose of cutting tiles and bricks do you guys know if this can then be used as a drop saw/mitre saw to cut wood.

The saws seems to be fairly expensive here in Sydney and I dont mind spending the $$$$$ if I can use it for other things but aside from selling it on ebay there wont be much else I would be able to use it for after the WFO oven build. Unless ofcourse my friends and family as me to build WFO for them LOL.

Thanks for the info guys
Imran
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  #18  
Old 04-14-2008, 05:42 AM
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Default Re: Tile saw question-

Hey PizzaJNKY - Be real careful about building the WFO and then having to do the bathroom to "pay" for it. I thought that was the deal I was getting into and somehow a new kitchen showed up in the small-print!! Read the contract with care.

Let me add that the oven was worth it in the end and I was able to incorporate a granite pizza forming area in the kitchen. She thinks it was for her to roll-out the pasta dough

Chuck
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  #19  
Old 04-14-2008, 07:33 AM
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Default Re: Tile saw question-

Imran - You need to do a comparison. What is the RPM of the Chop/Drop saw that is designed for Wood and one that is used for Bricks. I don't know myself so that is one question to look into. If the HorsePower and rpm is close to the same then I would say sure use the same machine.

Other things to look out for. A dry saw even with water soaked bricks will kick up a lot of abrasive dust. This sutff is not good for the motor. Most wood chop saws have an open motor housing. To keep the tool up after you are done with the briks you will want to take the motor apart for a thourough cleaning. If the bearing are not sealed (they should be) you will need to replace them. Probably need to replace or at least inspect the brushes too. One thought to reduse the intake into the notor is to scab on some sort of cover that keeps the dust away but still lets the motor breathe.

Finally as I am sure you are aware don't use the carbide tipped wood blade on the bricks- get a brick blade.

je
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  #20  
Old 04-15-2008, 02:10 PM
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Default Re: Tile saw question-

Quote:
Originally Posted by jengineer View Post
Imran - You need to do a comparison. What is the RPM of the Chop/Drop saw that is designed for Wood and one that is used for Bricks. I don't know myself so that is one question to look into. If the HorsePower and rpm is close to the same then I would say sure use the same machine.

Other things to look out for. A dry saw even with water soaked bricks will kick up a lot of abrasive dust. This sutff is not good for the motor. Most wood chop saws have an open motor housing. To keep the tool up after you are done with the briks you will want to take the motor apart for a thourough cleaning. If the bearing are not sealed (they should be) you will need to replace them. Probably need to replace or at least inspect the brushes too. One thought to reduse the intake into the notor is to scab on some sort of cover that keeps the dust away but still lets the motor breathe.

Finally as I am sure you are aware don't use the carbide tipped wood blade on the bricks- get a brick blade.

je
Jengineer,

Thanks for your response I definately wont be using one designed for wood to cut the bricks as the other responses said too much dust will ruin the drop saw but I am assuming that the one that is designed for bricks (wet saw) may be able to be used for wood if as you said HP and rpm are close ofcourse without the water connected.

My understanding is however that a brick/tile saw is just a bigger version of a grinder rather then a drop/circular saw. Will do some homework now.

Imran
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