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  #71  
Old 02-16-2013, 09:50 PM
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Default Re: Structural Slab for new WFO

About 350 liters perlite, give or take, but no vermiculite. The ratio to water came out to be about 30% by volume perlite. A little more volume than you estimated but your statistics are dead on as usual. Portland cement--just a tad over a 25kg bag. I had a bag that had a few chunks in it--first batch, then I tossed it. Did not want more variables to screw up the mixture!

As mentioned, I did leave an area maybe 40 cm diameter open at apex, but nothing compared to total surface area. Am having thoughts on a permanent vent at top of dome once everything is dry and enclosed.

There has been a lot of chatter about completed WFO's that have been gotten wet and had to go through the drying process again. Maybe not the amount of water I am dealing with right now. I think that firebrick really absorbs water as well.. I noticed that when doing the few cuts I had.

(Maybe a good new thread-" Design considerations to prevent water migration into WFO igloo design")- Do's and Don'ts

Just a lot of things racing through my mind... builders with counters up to the WFO's where rain might hit-- a real entry point for water!

Today was the first day that the sun shone with any intensity and the temperatures were higher. When I can, I will open the garage doors and get some sun/wind action--but the drying will be much decreased because of surface area..

Need to get the chimney attached and some heat inside. That basically means a move outdoors. At least I have some protection in place for that move. Will have to see how things work out. Still have overnight freezing temperatures to deal with!

Thank you for your input, technical leads, and non-judgemental advice. This is just a work in progress--learn as I go.
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  #72  
Old 02-16-2013, 10:29 PM
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Default Re: Structural Slab for new WFO

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Today was the first day that the sun shone with any intensity and the temperatures were higher.
Ill send you some we have plenty, we have it laying all over the ground doing nothing all I have to do is scoop it up in a bucket.
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  #73  
Old 02-16-2013, 10:50 PM
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Default Re: Structural Slab for new WFO

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Pictures, we need pictures.
Just getting back to you!
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  #74  
Old 02-17-2013, 03:52 AM
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Default Re: Structural Slab for new WFO

It would be nice to have some warm sunny days.. those are just weeks away before spring sets in.. probably the best time of year, things start sprouting, cherry trees come into bloom and still several months from the rainy season that seems to never stop...June thru Late July sometimes daily rain...Then the skies clear and suffocating heat and humidity! So humid that your sweat does not want to evaporate at all...just soak in it! High temperatures and dry weather are easier to tolerate...sweating has a cooling affect.

The lazy days of summer are still far away.. just looking forward to not having to burn wood in the wood stove upstairs--but instead in a newly commissioned WFO consuming my hoard of dry oak!

Best thing about right now...no insects!
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  #75  
Old 02-17-2013, 06:04 PM
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Default Re: Structural Slab for new WFO

After tossing around the drying, and firing methods; I came up with my solution based on what I have on hand.

A normal heating device used here is called a "fan heater". (FON-HEE-TAH in Japanese). It is fueled by a high grade of kerosene (supposed to not stink too much during use), but requires windows to be opened regularly to allow fresh air in... That has always been a counter-productive issue with me... but??? Old houses here do not need windows to be open--because there is plenty of fresh air leaking in everywhere and very little insulation.

The device has a thermostat for air temperature, and an automatic shut down program where it turns off every three hours.. if left unattended or as a reminder to allow fresh air in.

The blast of air that this little unit produces is pretty hot, but not nearly as hot as heat beads, I hope that it will eventually heat the refractory warm enough to start forcing the water out.

There are a couple of photos of the little heater, its performance data label and how it is set near the oven.

The thing consumes 1/3 liter kerosene per hour of operation. That is more than my total heating system uses to heat 1500sf on a daily basis. But my house is very well insulated--only using 5.5 liters/day last month.

I will run this for a few days to see how the drying goes. It will give me some time to get my chimney, arrange for a forklift and some other things for the following week. It will only heat the dome to the initial temperatures of firing--everything else will have to be done with an alternative fuel type.

I can tell right away--I have to keep some windows cracked all the time. Even though it is burning clean, it is dumping gasses in the air giving me a headache!



Structural Slab for new WFO-img_2601a.jpg

Structural Slab for new WFO-img_2602a.jpg

Structural Slab for new WFO-img_2603a.jpg
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  #76  
Old 02-17-2013, 06:16 PM
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Default Re: Structural Slab for new WFO

I am just being the devils advocate on this. I'm not meaning to be "woolfish". Charcoal starter fluid can leave a residue in steel that lasts from cook to cook. Do you think that diesel or kerosene (starter fluid) could permeate porous masonry?
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  #77  
Old 02-17-2013, 06:27 PM
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Default Re: Structural Slab for new WFO

I am gambling that it will not in this situation. The combustion is taking place outside of the oven, vapors should be similar to other fossil fuel -- CO2, and H2O, burnt twice--get Carbon monoxide. Maybe some other hydrocarbons but I have never smelled prolonged fuel odors inside a house where these heaters have been used. Also, there is no smoke evident!

The only wolfing going to happen around here is when I finally get to "wolf" down a great piece of pizza! Hopefully in the next few weeks!

Thanks for the devil's advocacy position--I would hate to be smelling sulfur and brimstone!
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  #78  
Old 02-17-2013, 08:38 PM
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Default Re: Structural Slab for new WFO

Mikku,

Prepare yourself for eternity, the only smell you will savory will be sulfur and brimstone.

Last edited by Laurentius; 02-17-2013 at 11:37 PM.
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  #79  
Old 02-17-2013, 11:35 PM
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Default Re: Structural Slab for new WFO

Remember that it is not temperature alone that determines how fast something will dry, but a combination of temperature humidity and air velocity (wind). If you can't get the thing outside to get the sun and wind do much of the work you may need to arrange a fan on the outer surface and vent the humidity outside. Where I live pottery usually dries much faster in the winter because although the temperature is lower we don't have the high humidity like we do in the summer even though the temperature is way hotter. You have three inches of refractory, another four of wet vermicrete and probably another one of stucco. With that little heater it will take a long time for any of it's heat to get anywhere near the outside.
After a couple of weeks of your drying throw some plastic sheeting over the dome to see if it still condenses under the plastic. This will tell you if there is still water present.

Last edited by david s; 02-17-2013 at 11:39 PM.
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  #80  
Old 02-18-2013, 12:18 AM
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Default Re: Structural Slab for new WFO

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Mikku,

Prepare yourself for eternity, the only smell you will savory will be sulfur and brimstone.
That doesn't sound like any discription of "heaven" that I ever heard of!
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