#11  
Old 01-17-2010, 04:05 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: So. Orange County, CA. USA
Posts: 1,156
Default Re: Some things that helped me and other thoughts

FXpose,
The board is what I did and I'm not unhappy about it. I spent $200 for a 4 by 6 2" sheet cut 52" by 48" and 20" by 48". The 52" by 48" underlays most of the oven I cut the 20" by 48" down to 20" by 26" and the remaining 20" by 22" became the door. I timmed the material with a table saw and a circular saw without issue. Just take care to avoid breathing the dust, wear a mask. You might check Pacific Insulation for prices on this as well.

Chris
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  #12  
Old 01-17-2010, 06:21 PM
dmun's Avatar
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Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: New Jersey USA
Posts: 4,216
Default Re: Some things that helped me and other thoughts

Quote:
If you go the Sairset route try to get a fresh batch, one of the batches I had was usable but old.
This is a constant problem with pre-mixed mortars. They don't have much of a shelf life, and the retailers don't have much incentive to throw out the outdated inventory.

Mind you, the same thing can happen with dry mixes. I had to toss a few lumps from atmospheric humidity in my dry mix refractory mortar.
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  #13  
Old 01-18-2010, 07:29 AM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: So. Orange County, CA. USA
Posts: 1,156
Default Re: Some things that helped me and other thoughts

In the end I envisioned that the dome was just an organized pile of bricks always falling into itself, and so the main job of the mortar is to act as a caulk between bricks. I know that this view is a bit simple minded, and the mortars "glue factor" is important to hold the bricks together and direct the lateral forces downward into the base structure. Dmun had a link to the science of arches, fun reading, for me, thanks Dmun!

Chris
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  #14  
Old 01-18-2010, 01:50 PM
altamont's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Altamont, NY
Posts: 43
Default Re: Some things that helped me and other thoughts

I used Sairset as well for the majority (until I ran out and my source couldn't resupply for a couple weeks). I also used #1 Arch brick so I minimized the 'between-each-ring' joint thickness. One advantage to the Sairset was the fact that it 'takes a set' quickly minimizing some of the support needs. I finished up with Super 3000 and never took a good 'set' - it felt more "oozie", like sticky toothpast that would just get thicker. Super 3000 left me having to use sticks to support the brick.
To reduce costs, I would butter the ring-to-ring faces and tamp in place with a little 'twist'. Anchored the brick well. Try to pull a brick up and it would be stuck in place as if held by a slight vacuum. I minimized the Sairset usage between brick in each ring by buttering a blob at the hot-face joint. The Sairset would extend from the hot face back between the two bricks about 1/2 - 1 inch. The balance of that 'wedge' shaped joint I filled with home-brew mortar after I laid a complete ring of brick.
Worked nicely. I stood and jumped up and down on top of the dome when I had it done. The Arch brick mean the oven will probably be standing long after I've gone to the big bakery in the sky.
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