Go Back   Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community > Pizza Oven Design and Installation > Getting Started

Like Tree21Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 10-28-2012, 12:10 PM
brickie in oz's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Whittlesea
Posts: 3,455
Default Re: I am sooooo stubborn!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie M. View Post

Annie... who has managed to capture wild yeast!!!
I caught some wild yeast years ago when I went to the top end of Queensland, had to get some ointment to get rid of it.
Lburou likes this.
__________________
The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 10-28-2012, 04:33 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 149
Default thinking about the vault

Brickie... so glad you recovered!

This afternoon I am leaning toward the barrel vault... building the dome is like building a little Duomo di Firenze, it takes a lot of cuts and a lot of skill. I believe I have a better opportunity for success with the arched vault. Primarily due to the fact that I think I can do it with very few cuts and it affords the opportunity in the future to easily add mass. Also, I bake more bread than pizza and my heart is crying for good bread.

I have attached a few photos of what I am trying to get straight in my mind...

The first photo is my idea of how to get around cutting bricks, the brick with the coin would be cut at an angle and act as a keystone the rest would be mortared... close up in second photo. Of course the bricks would be laid stacked as in the third photo with the long side facing out... not the short side, otherwise the oven would be thick as a brick! The brickwork would end up with a raised spine going along the the top of the vault...

Can this work to hold up the vault and prevent the whole thing crashing down to the floor?

Annie... in desperate need of technical advice
Attached Thumbnails
Rustic Primitive Materials-img_3906.jpg   Rustic Primitive Materials-img_3907.jpg   Rustic Primitive Materials-img_3909.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 10-28-2012, 05:03 PM
mrchipster's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Minneapolis, MN USA
Posts: 1,259
Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

You will want to use a running bond in the dome to increase its strength.
If you look at a traditional brick wall it is a running bond where the bricks are staggered.

Chip
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 11-29-2012, 11:55 AM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 149
Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

OK... now that I have a rock solid base do I actually need a concrete slab to put under the insulation and the firebricks? I am assuming that the concrete slab is necessary when the base is not solid and to provide a level surface for the build. My base is infilled and absolutely stable & can take many times the weight of the oven ...so can I now just jump to the insulation layer and the firebrick floor?
Attached Thumbnails
Rustic Primitive Materials-img_3935.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 11-29-2012, 12:03 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 3,076
Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

That looks very nice, but it is still a flexible surface and you will need an inflexible surface for your oven. As you appear to have some batter to your wall, you will probably also want to cantilever the entry out over the wall a bit so you will not have to lean over to work the oven.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 11-29-2012, 12:34 PM
mrchipster's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Minneapolis, MN USA
Posts: 1,259
Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

I am sure the foundation you have provided will drain well but I think a water proof barrier between the foundation and the hearth slab may also be a good idea, someting as simple as a piece of sheet metal would do the trick. Water may wick up through the foundation you made and cause problems with heating without some form of barrier.

Chip
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 11-29-2012, 02:20 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 149
Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

Thanks!! These are important things to consider.
I am still taking baby steps but I'll get there!
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 11-29-2012, 02:47 PM
Laurentius's Avatar
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Japan
Posts: 852
Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

Hi Annie,

Glad to hear that you are still around, taking your time. Hang in there. Cooked our turkey, dressing and bread in my over, tomorrow cinnamon buns and rye bread.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 11-30-2012, 03:31 PM
cobblerdave's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: brisbane australia
Posts: 2,344
Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

Gdday Annie
I wouldn't put away you plans for a dome oven just yet. Yes there a plenty of Really impressive ovens with the brickwork fitting together like a puzzle and whilst you have got to admire the workmanship you can build a good dome oven a bit more simply.
I used 1/2 and 1/4 bricks to build my own oven and they were cut with a simple brick bulster and the fancy cuts with a inexpensive angle grinder and diamond blade. Yes you end up with some larger gapes in the brickwork but it still works the same.
Heres a simple plan for you to consider.
Run a level row of bricks around the top of your stand. Fill with concrete this will give you a 3 1/2 in top. add some scrap steel if you want for extra strenght.
Run another ring of bricks ( leave a couple of weap holes just in case) fill with "pearlcrete". Thats your base insulation taken care of.
Lay a layer of brick to form the hearth.
Build a brick arch for your entrance leaving the formwork in place for the moment.
Now a ring of brick in the shape of your oven mortar the edges not the bottoms (the dome needs to be able to expand separate to the hearth).
Now fill the space in the middle with wet sand or soil and shape it into the dome shape you need. A simple stick through the middle to check the height.
When your satisfied with the shape, cover with plastic or layers of wet newspaper to stop the morter from sticking to the soil.
Now brick it up with 1/2 bricks layer by layer till near the top you'll need some smaller say1/4 brick sizes. Yes use the poor mans mortar mix.
Leave to set for a couple of days, remove the entrance formwork and dig out your sand formwork. ( a good trick is to include some empty softdrink bottles in the sand form, less soil to dig out)
Of course you'll have to use that lovely cast door somewere in here and you have inslate the dome, a cover over that, entrance, chimney etc but first thing first.
Anyway hope something in here helps

Regards Dave
__________________
Measure twice
Cut once
Fit in position with largest hammer

My Build

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

My Door

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 12-01-2012, 03:10 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 149
Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

Dave,

I really like your suggestions... using some of the bricks for a containment ring for the 'slab' and insulation is a super way to do this. The method for the dome also seems like something I could do. I may just lay the hearth bricks on a packed sand layer... in a few days I will have hauled enough beautiful fine sand from the beach for that and the dome form if I go that way.

I actually baked a loaf of bread in the wood stove that heats my home today... the stove is just lined with splits and has no insulation below and the bread came out gorgeous. So I am confident that even my humble build will produce wonderful food.

Next week I should have the oven floor done... yippee !!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Finding local building materials james Finding Building Materials 54 08-13-2014 04:52 PM
materials in Sacramento cynon767 Finding Building Materials 1 11-19-2009 08:31 PM
Door materials to avoid? dbhansen Design Styles, Chimneys and Finish 18 10-04-2009 03:14 AM
Materials in RI And Eastern CT - Where I bought dinoforno Pompeii Oven Construction 4 08-11-2009 07:57 AM
Plans & materials before stand? dbhansen Getting Started 1 09-06-2007 10:10 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:25 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC