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  #11  
Old 10-24-2012, 01:16 PM
Laurentius's Avatar
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Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

Hi Annie,

We didn't think that you would be picking ceramic boards and blankets from your friend's shard pile? That door looks great, but HEAVY, and it will get HOT and you need handles. It might be better served as a rustic plaque?
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  #12  
Old 10-25-2012, 06:14 PM
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Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

I made a little progress today... I hope.

I was able to acquire some new firebricks at what I hope is a reasonable price (1.25/1.45) for split and full bricks. However they were just on a pallet with no manufacture identification but I jumped in anyway and purchased some.

The splits weigh 3 lbs 9.5 oz & the full bricks weigh 6 lbs 8 oz does this sound like the correct weight for the type of brick usually used for the oven floor?

Fingers crossed... Annie
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  #13  
Old 10-25-2012, 11:03 PM
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Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie M. View Post
I made a little progress today... I hope.

I was able to acquire some new firebricks at what I hope is a reasonable price (1.25/1.45) for split and full bricks. However they were just on a pallet with no manufacture identification but I jumped in anyway and purchased some.

The splits weigh 3 lbs 9.5 oz & the full bricks weigh 6 lbs 8 oz does this sound like the correct weight for the type of brick usually used for the oven floor?

Fingers crossed... Annie
Sounds good, the heaver the brick the denser it is.
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  #14  
Old 10-26-2012, 07:13 AM
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Default I have a plan!! ...almost

Thanks Brickie... with a name like that you must know bricks!

I can't seem to let go of the idea of integrating the cast iron plate into my oven so I am forging ahead with that. Cast iron is known for it's heat retention... tubs were made of it for that very reason, wood stoves also. I think the problem with my original idea was the lack of insulation for the floor structure so now I am going to do an 'iron sandwich'... the rock base is complete & I even finished up another 1/2 foot with the field stone capping!

My plan is to put a layer of insulating material (undecided as to the specifics as yet) then the cast iron plate... then 2 layers of the new bricks for the floor. Just to be sure I am going to configure a prototype dome using angle iron for supports to test the design and see how it holds heat before I do anything permanent with mortar.

Yesterday someone gave me one of those laser thermometers so I think that will help assess the situation... and speaking of help I already have some strong neighbors that are amenable to lifting the cast iron slab to the base... another neighbor has a cement mixing thing that I may use if I wish with his assistance... so my oven is already bringing people together and it doesn't even exist yet... a wonderful thing!!

Annie... happily building an 'off-the-wall' oven
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  #15  
Old 10-26-2012, 12:13 PM
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Default Re: I have a plan!! ...almost

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Originally Posted by Annie M. View Post
a prototype dome using angle iron for supports to test the design and see how it holds heat before I do anything permanent with mortar.
The steel will buckle with the oven heat.
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  #16  
Old 10-26-2012, 12:30 PM
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Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

YIKES!! so... basically I am unwittingly building a super nova 40 feet from my house!!

OK... I will keep posting all new plans & half baked ideas ... Thank you so much for the benefit of your experience... after all we are playing with fire!

I just discovered a thread where they are roasting coffee beans!!!!! This is an amazing forum!!
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  #17  
Old 10-26-2012, 02:32 PM
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Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

Annie,
Have your read the plans that Laurentius posted yet?
I ask because, even if you don't actually follow them, they give some good guidance on the basic dimensions and concepts.
There is a need to balance the amount of thermal mass in the dome against the mass in the floor.
I'm a bit concerned about your intention to have a layer of cast iron topped by two layers of brick. I am interested to know how thick that would make your floor compared to your dome.
Most builds seem to have a single layer of full thickness fire brick for a floor.
The floor is heated mostly by reflected/radiated heat from the dome, and if there is too much mass compared to the dome, you may end up with a large temperature differential.
What do more experienced builders think?
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  #18  
Old 10-26-2012, 03:40 PM
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Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

I have given the plans a brief overview... I do sincerely value the time and consideration of the advice I am being given and I shall read the plans in depth this weekend.

Your point of the balance of the two thermal masses is well taken... I must consider the reality of the physics of the oven as a system, it is not just a clump of bricks I toss together playfully at random.

I did however make some progress this afternoon in locating ceramic fiber insulation blanket... a 1 inch blanket 2'x50' is $100. Can these be doubled over to increase the thickness? Cob ovens seem to be the rage around here now... I have no idea as to their efficiency, is it feasible to build the oven from brick and then give it a slathering in that trendy mud to insulate and omit the blanket?

I think things are quickly drifting from my initial conception of a simple rustic/primitive oven... but I now wonder if a simple oven that I had envisioned may have safety concerns and the actual build of something safe and efficient may be beyond my means. Oh well... I can always build a little fire and just roast something on a stick in the moonlight... that could be a happy time too.

Last edited by Annie M.; 10-26-2012 at 03:42 PM. Reason: strange typo
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  #19  
Old 10-26-2012, 05:30 PM
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Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

Hi Annie,

Yes, you can mud cover your bricks or even go totally cob. But now it seems as if you have community interest and offers to help, If I were you, and I have been you in respect to my oven. I would build the most efficient oven I could and the first concern after size would be insulation. A well insulated oven will allow multiply uses during the week without having to use more fuel with little or no maintaining. Three(3) inches of ceramic blanket is recommended for the dome and two(2) inches of ceramic board for the floor. I see the wheel spinning in your mind saying,"What the hell am I getting myself into"? It will take about the same amount of time to do something (half-assed, something my mother used to say to me) as it would to do it right. If you are having doubts(don't do anything for a while, thing about it). Word of caution: Take no advice from Cob Ovens Builders, if they mention glass, sand, mud-straw or fiberglas as insulation for an oven.
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  #20  
Old 10-26-2012, 05:43 PM
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Default Re: Rustic Primitive Materials

Annie -
fellow NW builder here. Take a look at mcgillswarehouse for your blanket and insulating board. You can insulate top and bottom for ~$200. Rustic ovens are cool, but insulation is really the thing that makes modern ovens so much better than roman ovens.
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