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-   -   Newbie question: Foundation on slope (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f6/newbie-question-foundation-slope-19400.html)

super80 05-20-2013 06:34 AM

Newbie question: Foundation on slope
 
Hello!

My name is Victor and I am in the early planning stages of adding a WFO to my back yard in Georgia. Probably going to go with a modular kit.

The first thing I need to determine is how to go about creating the foundation on ground that slopes down? Are there any resources someone can direct me to that address this? I estimate the ground slopes down about two to three feet from the front to the back of the slab I want to pour, so I would need to build up the sloped area. Should I make a retaining wall out of railroad ties? New to this so any advice would be appreciated

Thanks!

rsandler 05-21-2013 06:10 AM

Re: Newbie question: Foundation on slope
 
I had the same issue with my build, although I think my slope was more like a foot, front to back. Gulf had some good advice on my build thread, with pictures, here: http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/3...-dc-18213.html

I should note that I still haven't gotten around to putting a retaining wall in around my excavation, and haven't had a problem yet, 8 rainy months later.

stonecutter 05-21-2013 06:31 AM

Re: Newbie question: Foundation on slope
 
If your masonry experience is little to none, then consider building the retaining wall with modular wall units. Use free draining backfill and make sure that you install drainage behind it. RR ties are junk...even though they are treated, they rot quickly when they are constantly in contact with moisture. Even if they did last 20 years...they stink and look like crap....IMO.

Any slab or wall built on a sloped grade is no different than one that isn't...that is to say, you want your support (walls/foundations/slabs) built at right angles. Do not follow the slope of the grade with your masonry.

super80 05-21-2013 06:33 AM

Re: Newbie question: Foundation on slope
 
Many thanks for the replies!

super80 05-21-2013 08:00 AM

Re: Newbie question: Foundation on slope
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by stonecutter (Post 153251)
If your masonry experience is little to none, then consider building the retaining wall with modular wall units.

Hi stonecutter, my masonry experience is limited to say the least :D, but I am a fast learner. Can you recommend a brand/source for modular retaining wall units? Most of the retaining wall tutorials I have found show the use of decorative blocks, which when stacked are not 90 degrees, they more or less have an angle to them as the retaining wall rises in height. I assume from my research this is referred to as a segmental gravity wall. Should I build a cantilever wall? Also, does the retaining wall have to reside on a poured footing?

Thanks again!

stonecutter 05-21-2013 08:35 AM

Re: Newbie question: Foundation on slope
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by super80 (Post 153262)
Hi stonecutter, my masonry experience is limited to say the least :D, but I am a fast learner. Can you recommend a brand/source for modular retaining wall units? Most of the retaining wall tutorials I have found show the use of decorative blocks, which when stacked are not 90 degrees, they more or less have an angle to them as the retaining wall rises in height. I assume from my research this is referred to as a segmental gravity wall. Should I build a cantilever wall? Also, does the retaining wall have to reside on a poured footing?

Thanks again!

The slope you are referring to is called batter. Retaining wall systems are built this way to combat pressure from the ground behind it. I can't really recommend a specific brand, because I build with natural stone or natural stone veneer over poured concrete or Blackwell. Like a dry laid stone wall, modular wall systems don't need a concrete footing...they are flexible to movement. Upward thrust is less concern than lateral pressure, so it's important that you have drainage, cut the bank down in steps, and build


wall with a baa batter

stonecutter 05-21-2013 08:37 AM

Re: Newbie question: Foundation on slope
 
That last line is ...with a batter. Typing in a phone sucks....there's a reason I work with stone and not a cpu

super80 05-21-2013 08:38 AM

Re: Newbie question: Foundation on slope
 
Thanks for the tips!

stonecutter 05-21-2013 08:39 AM

Re: Newbie question: Foundation on slope
 
That last line is ...with a batter. Typing in a phone sucks....there's a reason I work with stone and not a cpu



And that's blockwork, not Blackwell...sheesh

deejayoh 05-21-2013 09:01 AM

Re: Newbie question: Foundation on slope
 
I built my oven on a sloped site. I had a retaining wall poured that was 3 feet tall, and built my hearth on top of that. Cost of the retaining wall was pretty significant, but I needed it to make my back yard usable. Plus I had a design in mind for a whole kitchen area. click on the link to my build and you can see the site in the sketchup in the first post.

If you don't want a wall, I would dig out the slope for the shape of your foundation and build up the wall around it with CMU like you can get at any big box retailer or masonry specialist. Use rebar to tie the CMU to the foundation and fill every core with cement (instead of every other) to give it more strength.


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