#21  
Old 04-25-2010, 11:52 AM
texman's Avatar
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Default Re: New project-existing slab question

Any ideas on Vent hoods out there? My area is covered and a 7.5 ft heighth.
The vent hood is for over the grill, not for the WFO, WFO will have chimney through roof. I dont really think i need a powered hood, just a way for heat and some smoke to dissapate through a roof opening. The powered hoods are great, but $3k for one doesnt make sense.

Any ideas?
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  #22  
Old 04-25-2010, 01:12 PM
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Default Re: New project-existing slab question

Yeah, #6 aluminum is common on dryer runs. It's slightly cheaper than copper, though not much, and there's always the problem of corrosion. You'll notice that receptacles and breakers are labeled Al/Cu -- either material may be used in those fittings. I've not read the code in a while, and I'm not a real electrician, but splicing copper to aluminum is probably not a good idea.

Since this circuit is outside and potentially in a wet environment, you'll want a GFI (ground fault interrupter) protected breaker somewhere in the line. You can install it in the outside receptacle (it's a little less $$ and usually more convenient to troubleshoot) or in the breaker box. But no, other than that, you really don't need a second "breaker" outside. The one in the main box will do for the circuit. That's for general circuit overload protection. The GFI is protection against electrical leakage that could potentially cause personal injury.

If you're actually going to pull new wire I personally like #12-2 with a ground (that's actually 3 conductors, two insulated, one bare). It's a few cents more expensive than the typical #14-2, but you can run 20 amps to the circuit instead of the typical 15 amps. That keeps things like heavy electric users (like waffle irons) from throwing the breaker. You can be cooking waffles and cranking ice cream on the same circuit. Now that's my kind of electricity!

Depending on your actual electrical consumption outside, you may not need to pull two circuits. Just run #12-2 to a 20 amp GFI receptacle, then run conduit to a second non-GFI receptacle somewhere on the other side of your new oven area. If wired correctly, the GFI in the first receptacle will also protect the second - they're made that way. If you want to get the job done right, you should probably consult a real electrician. If you do the labor, they might be willing to just look it over to make sure you're not going to kill yourself. Depending on where you live, this might also actually be a code job and need to be inspected.

Check This link for more information about wiring and doing it right.
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  #23  
Old 04-27-2010, 03:12 PM
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Default Re: New project-existing slab question

Texman,

You might check with a local sheet metal fabricator - someone who does A/C duct work. A lot of commercial duct is custom bent and could be easily repurposed for what you need. Even here in "smalltown" Tennessee there is a sheetmetal fabricator who could easily do the work. Just take a sketch in and see what they say. Use some 22ga welded 8 inch flue pipe coming out the top and a chimney cap and you're good to go.

Last edited by lwalper; 04-27-2010 at 03:14 PM.
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  #24  
Old 05-12-2010, 12:04 PM
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Default Re: New project-existing slab question

Should have a roof tomorrow. This weekend is electrical and re-route a gas line for the grill. I am wondering if i will even use the grill much once i have the wfo. Seems like the grills take 2nd place. Ready to build if can ever get this other stuff out of the way.
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Old 05-27-2010, 04:29 AM
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Default Re: New project-existing slab question

A commercial kitchen has certain requirements and regulations that are not met in a small kitchenette that you will find in an office. These spaces cost much more to rent for a reason.
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