#11  
Old 10-09-2012, 03:18 PM
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Post Re: Kansas Corner Build

Glad that helped. The board unevenness seemed like a "big" deal at the time, but it wasn't. All this is so new when you get started and you plan and plan and then get a curve ball like that board that you cant plan for and have to adapt.
My IT was a work in process for sure. I had two problems that caused issues:
1. the brick must be centered in the clamp. (ie. The face pointing at the center of your oven floor) Look at post #36 in my thread, that was version 3.0, the final. 2. my original angle iron was too wide for the narrow bricks as you get around course 6. another issue that arose that i could have easily prevented, the caster i used for my pivot became locked by dried mortar and brick dust at the last few courses and was very stiff. Just cover it with tape or something to prevent. Once that IT is set, it is going to be there a while and you do not want it shifting from your setup.
I think i could write a book on the IT at this point, you learn so much actually doing the build. That IT is good to maybe 39" but could be modified with a longer piece of all thread. If you are interested in it, let me know and we can arrange shipping. It is a good tool after all the tweaks it went through, but not perfect. I would not even try a build without an IT or a form of some kind.
Tracy
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  #12  
Old 10-10-2012, 06:46 AM
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Default Re: Kansas Corner Build

You know, I intended to build my own. But to use one that has already successfully built a dome would save a lot of tinkering time. I may be a fool, but I think I am going to try to get this knocked out before Winter shuts me down. Time is something I have very little of at this point. I'll send you a private message to get in touch.

And I really appreciate the offer!

By the way, did the deejayoh's spreadsheet at http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f28/...tor-18131.html (Dome spreadsheet calculator) exist when you got started? Would it have been helpful to use it for your cuts or did it go quicker to measure and cut each course?

Thanks,
Casey
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  #13  
Old 10-10-2012, 08:00 AM
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Post Re: Kansas Corner Build

Saggy
Use the calculator. It wasn't out there when i was building and i wish it was. But, expect some adjustments also. Get your measurements and cut 3 or four bricks at a time and watch how they are fitting as you mortar and avoid the vertical joints from lining up. You may have to tweak your cuts as you go. Mortar gaps are not perfect and will cause variance from the measurements and even with the measurements, perfect cuts are a challenge. The calcs really help to have common size bricks for each course and avoid the chips (small bricks). I just eyeballed the bevel side cuts using brick slivers as a guide for the brick because the angle is so small. I know the freeze is bad for wet mortar and hard on the hands, but i think you can work in the winter and blanket your work to keep from freezing and get some done on the warm days we get.
tracy
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  #14  
Old 10-10-2012, 10:42 AM
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Default Re: Kansas Corner Build

The bevel cuts are on the top and bottom, correct? The cuts to the sides are the most dramatic? It almost looks like it would be just as easy, and would fit as well, to not make the top and bottom bevel cuts and fill the gaps with mortar. I'm sure that will become more clear after I set my third course or so.

But do I have this right? There are 4 cuts per brick per course. The top and bottom cuts are shallow and allow the bricks to make the curved transition to the top of the dome. And the side cuts are steeper cuts which allow the bricks to make the transition laterally around the dome. All 4 types of cut taper from small toward the dome's interior to large toward the exterior. I seem to recall reading about a fifth cut but I can't think what that would accomplish.

Casey
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  #15  
Old 10-10-2012, 10:55 AM
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Default Re: Kansas Corner Build

Casey,

Chiming in, you can combine a taper and bevel cut together with shims or a jig. There are lot of different variations out there. Here is an example I used on my build. Good luck.
Attached Thumbnails
Kansas Corner Build-33a-brick-jig-6.16.12.jpg   Kansas Corner Build-33b-brick-jig-6.16.12.jpg  
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  #16  
Old 10-10-2012, 11:36 AM
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Default Re: Kansas Corner Build

Thanks, Russell. It is cool to see people whose builds I have studied (apparently not enough studying yet!) chime in on this. I wouldn't even have considered tackling this project without this community and the collective knowledge.

So, if I am reading your jig right you would be able to accomplish the equivalent of 4 cuts with just 2 passes through the saw. What I don't get, though, is how the Z axis tilt on your jig accomplishes the bevel transition to the top of the dome. I expected to be cutting a brick like the attached sketchup model which I think requires 4 passes through the saw.

I like your approach better. I just can't wrap my brain around the final brick shape that comes out of your jig.

I will study your build more closely when I have some free time tonight. Thanks for the pointers!
Attached Thumbnails
Kansas Corner Build-taper_bevel1.jpg   Kansas Corner Build-taper_bevel2.jpg   Kansas Corner Build-taper_bevel3.jpg   Kansas Corner Build-taper_bevel4.jpg  
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  #17  
Old 10-10-2012, 12:05 PM
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Post Re: Kansas Corner Build

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saggy View Post
The bevel cuts are on the top and bottom, correct? The cuts to the sides are the most dramatic? It almost looks like it would be just as easy, and would fit as well, to not make the top and bottom bevel cuts and fill the gaps with mortar. I'm sure that will become more clear after I set my third course or so.

But do I have this right? There are 4 cuts per brick per course. The top and bottom cuts are shallow and allow the bricks to make the curved transition to the top of the dome. And the side cuts are steeper cuts which allow the bricks to make the transition laterally around the dome. All 4 types of cut taper from small toward the dome's interior to large toward the exterior. I seem to recall reading about a fifth cut but I can't think what that would accomplish.

Casey

Casey
I only cut the sides of the bricks, not the top and bottom. I agree, that is what mortar is for. After the full brick is cut in half, it should take two cuts to each half brick. Russell has a much better setup for the saw than i used. I just used brick wedges and squares. If you have the time, a setup like Russells' will produce a better product as his oven is proof. I just simply set a half brick in the IT and let it rest on the course below and then used my hand to hold another half brick adjacent to that one in the IT and measured the gap at the bottom face and the bottom rear and split those measurements in half to get the approximate angle of both bevels. Using mine or Russell's setup will make both cuts at the same time and extend some blade time. Mind you, i wish i only cut each brick twice. Some took 3 times that many to get right. Once you have an IT in place, the angles start jumping out at you. Make sense? look at post #133 on my thread for my saw setup. Also, look Lburos 10 best thread.
Tracy
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Last edited by texman; 10-10-2012 at 12:21 PM. Reason: comment
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  #18  
Old 10-10-2012, 01:04 PM
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Default Re: Kansas Corner Build

Casey,

Tracey is correct, both of us did not cut the top or bottom of the 1/2 brick. There is a thread out there where someone did a micro cut on the bottom to reduce the mortar gap on the back end but not commonly done. Here are a couple reference pics fromJCG31. I used his bevel/angle table to get me in the ball part but ultimately you have to tweek the angles as you go along. One tip, cut a few brick in each course then check angles, without fail the angles change due to mortar joints, brick dimension changes, etc. Tracey reference a new Excel calculator out there for doing taper and angle bevels. I have not used since it was done after I had finished but worth checking out.
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Kansas Corner Build-bevel-20chart3.jpg   Kansas Corner Build-anglebevel.jpg  
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Last edited by UtahBeehiver; 10-10-2012 at 01:05 PM. Reason: typo
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  #19  
Old 10-10-2012, 08:41 PM
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Default Re: Kansas Corner Build

I - Absolutely - Love this forum. It's a place for folks who had no idea what they are doing but still knew they could get it done.

Thanks Tracy and Russell both.

My next post will most likely be a summary of my pre-build getting started research with a link to my oven build thread. I'll post a refractory materials list and the Kansas City supplier where I purchased materials. I'll also summarize the build links I plan to refer back to throughout the build so future builders can follow the process.

Tracy, did you get my PM re. reusing your IT?

Casey

Last edited by Saggy; 10-11-2012 at 04:32 AM.
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  #20  
Old 10-10-2012, 08:55 PM
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Default Re: Kansas Corner Build

Russell, sorry for remaining dense. I'm preparing for a big presentation next week so can't spend too much time studying builds.

Does the shape you posted alternate in the course from broad-face up to thin-face up? I still can't, for some reason, see how those blocks fit together.

Again, for those who read this thread later, i will summarize and point to my later build thread!
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