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Ken S. 08-27-2006 06:22 PM

High temp electrical romex and fixtures
 
I wasnt quite sure what to put in my title. I am looking for a source (if it exists) of high temperature electrical wire and light fixtures and light bulbs. It would be nice, if it is technically possible to put a light inside the ovens. I tried to research it on the internet but couldnt find anything. It seems if we can put a man on the moon that we should be able to light a pizza oven. However I also realize that not everyone accepts that we have put people on the moon. Thanks Ken

jengineer 08-28-2006 09:55 AM

Metal is metal
 
And it all has a finite melting point. If you take a magnet and heat it up it will lose its properties. The key is in insulation. The wire will need to be heavily insulated from the heat otherwise it will lose its capability to carry current. First blush to look is at an industrial gas/electrical stove manufacturer. I know my mom's oven had a shielded light bulb, behind some sort of thermal glass. It was a real PITA to replace it. I remember hearing some choice Sicilian words out of my dad's mouth that day. The next time it burned out he bought mom a new stove that had no light.

Another option is to get in touch with someone that works at your local power plant - providing they are using natural gas, pulverized coal. In high school we tool a tour of a fluidized bed power generation station. Someone in the controls gorup may be ablet o lend some info.

Are you sure you really want a light in the oven? If you are cooking with flame the coals should gove off enough light. granted it is not white light but after a while you should be able to properly judge it. If you are baking bread I can see a need for a light.

Aaron 02-21-2008 06:20 PM

Re: High temp electrical romex and fixtures
 
I had the same problem, and solved it by buying some high temperature wire (available on the internet - I got 850F wire), and an old-fashioned ceramic light fixture from the hardware store. The fixture screws onto the face of a standard electrical box, and the wire screws into the back of the fixture. No plastic fittings required, and the insulator on the wire is fiberglass.

neffk 01-28-2010 08:16 AM

Re: High temp electrical romex and fixtures
 
I was poking around on the interweb and found this example of an oven with a light built into it [1]. There aren't a lot of details, but maybe it's enough for inspiration; a recipe of sorts.

I'm thinking of doing something like this with a DIY double or tripple glazed window [2] and the light on the outside. In MN, double-glazed windows can experience 50-100 oF temperature differentials without much effort, so I'm sure a few hundred degrees should be no problem. Then the light fixture does not experience the full heat of the oven.

Most of the high-temp wire I found is good for 250 oF or so. Some is good up to 450 oF, but that's about all. There are wires for really high temperatures, but they seem excessive for a back-yard oven [3].

I'd sure like to hear from anyone else who has done anything else.

1. MHA News - 2006 Meeting - Backyard Oven with Peter Moore
2. Make a maintainable DIY double-glazed window
3. Mineral-insulated copper-clad cable - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

SCChris 01-29-2010 07:26 AM

Re: High temp electrical romex and fixtures
 
What about something that you can pull out for the blaze phase and put back in for the baking. Since the baking is going to be somewhere south of 500F the 850F wire with ceramic fixture and high temp bulb wouldn't be elegant but would work.

Chris

dmun 01-29-2010 10:34 AM

Re: High temp electrical romex and fixtures
 
One of my sources of firewood is construction debris: I should have kept all those porcelain tubes that I raked out with the ashes, from the knob and tube wiring.

Is there any reason you can't run bare copper past the insulation layer, and attach it to standard romex there?

metalmaster 01-29-2010 02:47 PM

Re: High temp electrical romex and fixtures
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by dmun (Post 79010)
One of my sources of firewood is construction debris: I should have kept all those porcelain tubes that I raked out with the ashes, from the knob and tube wiring.

Is there any reason you can't run bare copper past the insulation layer, and attach it to standard romex there?

I dont think that will pass the building code :D


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