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woods witch 06-18-2008 05:44 PM

hearth insulation question
 
hi everyone I have the foundation poured and the blocks done. I am ready to do the hearth this weekend.:D I am using your plans for the 42" oven and I have a question about a product that I have access to. It is a material called "Smooth Kote" and I am considering using it to insulate the hearth. It is made of Portland Cement, Fire Clay, loose mineral fibers and silica. It is very light material in 45lb bags. It's used for refractory work as an insulation mix over firebrick and over mineral board. It is mixed with water like concrete and cures the same.......only lighter. I have a whole pallet full and really want to use it. I can't rationalize any reason not to, but this is the first oven I've done. If anyone knows of the product or can think of any reason not to use it, please let me know!!! I can use all the advise I can get...thanks in advance! Jerry

dmun 06-18-2008 06:28 PM

Re: hearth insulation question
 
At least one maker has insulated with lightweight concrete (AAC) below the hearth. I don't know about the material you're considering. Even if it won't stand up to the 700 degrees of the outside of the firebrick, it might make a fine secondary insulation, isolated by a thin layer of blanket or board.

I suggest calling the manufacturer, ask for an applications engineer, and discuss your plan. They would know a whole lot more about the stuff than I would.

SpringJim 06-19-2008 03:48 AM

Re: hearth insulation question
 
The silica, fireclay and portland all sound like normal (non insulating) materials. I'd find out what percent is the mineral fibers.

Since you've got a lot of it, it may make a great dome covering, particularly if it has good insulating properties.

Good luck.

Modthyrth 06-19-2008 09:02 AM

Re: hearth insulation question
 
When I was calling around yesterday looking for local sources of Heatstop 50, one vendor offered up Smooth Kote as an alternate high heat mortar product. I'd be very interested to learn what applications the manufacturer suggests for its use; please report back if you investigate the matter!

asudavew 06-19-2008 09:26 AM

Re: hearth insulation question
 
Doesn't sound like an insulator to me.

woods witch 06-19-2008 09:59 AM

Re: hearth insulation question
 
the bag says "insulates up to 1200 degrees @ 1/2" thick". My concern is more about the strength of the product. I haven't had any luck contacting the manufacturer, I'm not sure they are still in business....
the stuff sets like concrete and it's formable. I'm going to pour a small pad in a form to try a "test-run " just to see how strong it seems. the bag does not provide a break down of percentages of materials. I post my results.

asudavew 06-19-2008 10:36 AM

Re: hearth insulation question
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by woods witch (Post 35394)
the bag says "insulates up to 1200 degrees @ 1/2" thick". .

:eek: That's Awesome! Sounds like it's perfect.


I guess those fibers are the key.
Because, without those, the ingredients are similar to poor man's high-heat mortar.

Let us know how it works out.
Maybe a few pictures!

Dave

dmun 06-19-2008 11:42 AM

Re: hearth insulation question
 
When you do your test, I would suggest pouring a block the size of a firebrick. When it's fully dry, weigh it 8 pounds: conducts heat. 2 pounds: insulates.

By the way, you don't need any particular strength in your insulating concrete. Vermiculite concrete is very weak except for compressive strength.

asudavew 06-19-2008 12:04 PM

Re: hearth insulation question
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by dmun (Post 35401)
When you do your test, I would suggest pouring a block the size of a firebrick. When it's fully dry, weigh it 8 pounds: conducts heat. 2 pounds: insulates.

Good idear

woods witch 06-19-2008 06:09 PM

Re: hearth insulation question
 
talked to bravo guys ,they said as long as it is a insulating concrete product with portland , go for it . I guess try a test block and put a torch on the other side of it a see what happens with heat transfer ????????? any other ideas just chime in thanks jerry


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