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bgreed 09-19-2012 07:47 PM

Getting started
 
I'm getting ready to build a 36" oven. Now here is the question Instead of a slab could a chainwall be built (4" thick with rebar) with compacted pea gravel or crushed rock underneath and be stable? I have also considered a bed of pea gravel or crushed Rock with 4" thick pads to set the stand on.

Reason for this is I will be moving in the future and want to take the oven with me and not leave a noticable imprint.

I'm in Michigan just for reference

brickie in oz 09-20-2012 12:26 AM

Re: Getting started
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by bgreed (Post 138826)
I'm getting ready to build a 36" oven. Now here is the question Instead of a slab could a chainwall be built (4" thick with rebar) with compacted pea gravel or crushed rock underneath and be stable? I have also considered a bed of pea gravel or crushed Rock with 4" thick pads to set the stand on.

Reason for this is I will be moving in the future and want to take the oven with me and not leave a noticable imprint.

I'm in Michigan just for reference

If you are building a brick oven I really doubt you will be taking it with you.
Others have tried and I presume failed as we never hear of their success.

Bricks once laid dont like being transported, especially once the mortar has been fired. :)

david s 09-20-2012 02:32 AM

Re: Getting started
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by brickie in oz (Post 138831)
If you are building a brick oven I really doubt you will be taking it with you.
Others have tried and I presume failed as we never hear of their success.

Bricks once laid dont like being transported, especially once the mortar has been fired. :)

I agree, you'd be better off building, firing, cooking and learning then rebuild a better one when you move. If cash and time are constraints then start with a cob oven or a solid red brick one and make it small to save on time and materials. When my daughter sold her house which had an oven I'd built, the agent said "ooh, a pizza oven! That adds another $5000 onto the value of the place" it cost me way less than that to build it, even taking labour into account. (although I'm a pretty cheap worker)

jeeppiper 09-20-2012 04:32 AM

Re: Getting started
 
I also agree....not a good idea. I would think a reinforced/packed gravel foundation is still going to want to settle and move (possibly heave in the winter depending where you are)....

I like DavidS's idea. Build a small oven, learn from it, then sell it with your house. It will not only increase the value of your house, it should also help to quickly sell your house. Then you can build a new oven in your new place.

I sometimes think about selling my house...ONLY because it will allow me the opportunity to build another oven!

bgreed 09-20-2012 07:24 PM

Re: Getting started
 
The soil here is very stable so my thought is with the gravel base all water should pretty much be able to drain away thus no heaving as it's the frozen water that causes the problem.

Thing is I rent where I am currently so the reason for wanting to take it with me. I suppose I coult build a red brick using solid fired bricks. What about problems with spalling from the heat?

Another question I'm thinking of using the sheet insulation under the oven can I build my oven on top of it with the floor or should I make my oven side wall higher so that the oven wall sits on the concrete hearth slab and the insulation and brick floor are inside? (Does that make sense?)

Was thinking about using a metal stand for the oven rather than block. I have heard of some guys with mobile brick ovens but have not seen anything on how they hold up to travel.

Just a number of thoughts running through my mind to clarify before I actually start.

Thanks for the input.

mrchipster 09-20-2012 08:03 PM

Re: Getting started
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by bgreed (Post 138890)
The soil here is very stable so my thought is with the gravel base all water should pretty much be able to drain away thus no heaving as it's the frozen water that causes the problem.

Thing is I rent where I am currently so the reason for wanting to take it with me. I suppose I coult build a red brick using solid fired bricks. What about problems with spalling from the heat?

Another question I'm thinking of using the sheet insulation under the oven can I build my oven on top of it with the floor or should I make my oven side wall higher so that the oven wall sits on the concrete hearth slab and the insulation and brick floor are inside? (Does that make sense?)

Was thinking about using a metal stand for the oven rather than block. I have heard of some guys with mobile brick ovens but have not seen anything on how they hold up to travel.

Just a number of thoughts running through my mind to clarify before I actually start.

Thanks for the input.

Only insulation should sit on the concrete slab, none of the oven components (floor, walls, or arches) should sit on the slab. insulation is ther for a reason.

to go higher add another row of bricks, to go lower well you get the idea.

a metal stand might be your best bet here. the legs could be easily detached from the oven, even if it takes a torch.

there are many small ovens out there on wheels.

Chip

bgreed 09-29-2012 07:00 PM

Re: Getting started
 
Well I made the decision. I started laying out the foundation today. I will pour four 2'x2' x4" under each one will be 4" of compacted pea gravel. On top of these will build 16" square piers out of cement block. Then will form the slab to rest on these. It should be plenty stable without having to worry about heaving. ALso easy to break apart when when I'm ready to move.

bgreed 10-16-2012 06:22 PM

Re: Getting started
 
So the build is started. I dug down far enough to build up a bed of 4" of compacted pea gravel under each 24"x24" pad which is has a nominal thickness of 4" concrete is a five sack mix. Next will be building up four piers using chimney blocks 16"x16"x8" with 4"x 4"x16" solid block laid flat to cap each pier. I plan on pouring a 4" slab on top of this 60"x70" reinforced with rebar five bag mix with 5/8" aggregate. question is do I need to pour an insulating layer as I am planning on using 3" of supersol insulating board under the oven floor?

bgreed 10-16-2012 06:37 PM

Re: Getting started
 
Never mind about the super isol board I found my answer:D

Faith In Virginia 10-16-2012 07:37 PM

Re: Getting started
 
bgreed, I live in Virginia, my oven is set for a move in the future. It sits on a gravel bed (no concrete) and my oven base is made of logs. I made my oven base with a place for forks or straps to get under the oven for the lift. I also went extra thick with good rebar for the future lift.

My oven and base have not moved and I have no problems with the gravel so I think you will be just fine with your plan.


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