#11  
Old 11-29-2008, 09:10 PM
david s's Avatar
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Default Re: Exterior Dome Finish

Fly ash is one of the main ingredients in castable refractory materials and tends to make any mixtures more thixotropic, but have no idea of its advantages in an insulation mix. Ask Rado.
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  #12  
Old 11-29-2008, 09:29 PM
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Default Re: Exterior Dome Finish

now we are getting somewhere...a refractory use.
David, how readily available is this stuff in Australia? None of us yanks in the US seem to know much about it. I found more information on the proper handling and disposal than I did on actual uses. From what I found, depending on the type, it is a suitable substitute for sand and portland cement. It just isn't something we can go to the local building/masonry supplier and purchase.

If anyone knows Rado, ask him why he uses this as part of his insulation......enquiring minds would like to know.

RT
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Old 11-29-2008, 10:39 PM
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Thumbs up Re: Exterior Dome Finish

We have a electricity power station 300km north of Adelaide at Port Augusta which burns a poor grade of brown coal.
A mate of mine (worked with him for 25 years) use to drive a semi tanker up there to collect 24+ ton of the 'coal ash' which was still hot, very fine and was added to Portland cement (to make 'blended' cement) and was called fly ash'.
I used to do the occassional trip with him for company.
I would not use it as it will increase your thermal mass and not insulate!

Neill
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  #14  
Old 11-30-2008, 01:06 AM
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Default Re: Exterior Dome Finish

If you are interested in this topic, then research geopolymers. Quite facinating, I have done some experimentation with different mixtures years ago, but not much recently.
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Old 11-30-2008, 01:15 AM
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Default Re: Exterior Dome Finish

Given the amount of coal that is burned in power stations, there must be mountains of the stuff to get rid of. I used to do quite a bit of experimentation using wood ash as a major ingredient of stoneware glaze for pottery. The trouble with the wood ash is that its composition is quite different depending on the type of wood used. Ash contains varying amounts of silica alumina and flux and you have to test each batch. This might be getting a bit off topic, but might also help in the use of the material for our purposes. By the way don't worry about the flux aspect, stoneware matures above 1200 C and would not create any problems for our (low) temps.
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Old 11-30-2008, 03:09 AM
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Default Re: Exterior Dome Finish

Coal ash is what is left over after coal is burned in power plants to generate electricity. It is available for free where I live in Tasmania where as vermiculite is about $47 Aus. per bag. Coal ash is used by Rado of Wood pizza oven Building wood burning brick bread ovens in place of vermiculite and perlite and is mixed at the same rate as vermiculite ie 13 coal ash, 1 cement and 1 lime. I intend using this between wall and oven with ceramic blanket on top of oven and would like to know if it would have any effect on the blanket if put the coal ash, cement, lime mix on top of the ceramic blanket as I have heard that the blanket should not be squashed down.
Thanks for comments so far, Paul
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