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Old 03-19-2011, 06:27 PM
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Thumbs up Re: Building my Oven with a mix of plans

Welp, your plan to support the bottom of your oven seems counterintuitive to me. I surmise that the footprint of your stand is essentially supporting the circumfrence of your dome, and you are comfortable with the steel and vermicrete for a hearth.

I hope it works for you

Since you are an engineer, I'll leave it there and watch and learn....While sincerely wishing you godspeed with your oven build

Keep us in the loop so we can watch each step of the way : popcorn :
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Last edited by Lburou; 03-19-2011 at 06:30 PM.
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  #12  
Old 03-19-2011, 06:32 PM
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Default Re: Building my Oven with a mix of plans

This build looks very risky. Eliminating the structural slab under the insulation seems inadequate, particularly if the 1/4" rods fail. Also, fitting together the entire dome with custom cut bricks without mortar sounds like a lot of work for little or no gain. Less than 5% of my interior dome has exposed mortar and the dome doesn't wear like the hearth does. Steffano Ferrano uses a similar method but doesn't custom cut all the dome bircks.
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Old 03-19-2011, 08:21 PM
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Default Re: Building my Oven with a mix of plans

Risky I'm ok with. Doomed is not an option. I built up a sample hearth and plan on testing the integrity of it with a Baldwin machine I have access to. If the hearth doesn't hold up. I'll take a more well traveled path.

As far as the dome with no mortar, that's a challenge I placed upon myself the only payoff will be my satisfaction.
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Old 03-19-2011, 08:49 PM
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Default Re: Building my Oven with a mix of plans

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Originally Posted by Bmwdiver View Post
TThe Steele wire is to keep the course from tipping outward while the dome is being constructed, it is wrapped around the entrance bricks which are recessed into the floor. The wire will then be moved to the outside of the clay mortar and inside the insulating layer to provide additional support.
The steel wire will go slack at the first sign of heat and serve no purpose at all once slack.
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Old 03-19-2011, 08:55 PM
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Default Re: Building my Oven with a mix of plans

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The steel wire will go slack at the first sign of heat and serve no purpose at all once slack.
Thanks; what would you use as a band to support the soldier course. I could use an aricon braid?
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Old 03-19-2011, 09:02 PM
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Default Re: Building my Oven with a mix of plans

Ive never built a round oven so dont know, there are many on the forum who have.
I dont know if they used support bands or not?
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Old 03-19-2011, 09:11 PM
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Default Re: Building my Oven with a mix of plans

I thought that if I encased the wire in the insulating layer of perlite and Portland cement that it would expand and not fully support but the structure would reinstated when the oven goes cold. After reviewing several failures with a tall soldier course the failures are after a hot cycle when the oven goes cold and shrinks.

Thanks for the input I'll look more closely at the possible effects, before I encase it with the light concrete.


I guess I just figured it would act the same as the re-bar that adds strength to a slab.

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Old 03-20-2011, 02:39 AM
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Default Re: Building my Oven with a mix of plans

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Originally Posted by brickie in oz View Post
The steel wire will go slack at the first sign of heat and serve no purpose at all once slack.
The expansion off steel wire should be the same as the refractory, it is with concrete anyhow. Because the wire is on the outside it is likely to be in tension as the refractory expands and the wire is cooler. Once the wire heats it should go slack and probably stretch and therefore not return to it's original length leaving it useful for the first heating cycle only. This is what happens with kilns that are held together with threaded rod and angle iron. They need to be tensioned up from time to time, but you won't have this option and your wire is far more stretchy than 10mm rod.

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Old 03-20-2011, 09:42 AM
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Default Re: Building my Oven with a mix of plans

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This build looks very risky.
I agree, but I would bet that if you complete your oven using your proposed design your oven will work okay. But for how long? Based on (FB) conventional wisdom, the inherent structural flaws have already been mentioned (hearth strength, soldier stability, sufficient dome wall thickness). Another questionable element in your design is the brick floor that extends past the perimeter of your oven. These bricks will take all the heat you can give them during firing and afterward, reducing the efficiency of your oven.

If your heart is in building an oven like Salvo's, go forth and enjoy the build from your own hands. FWIW, I have yet to see a custom hand-crafted brick oven (like the ones built here) from any of the Italian oven sites I have visited. Rather, they all (including Stefano Ferrara's) appear like they were designed and built to be completed as cheaply and quickly as possible.
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Old 03-20-2011, 01:14 PM
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Default Re: Building my Oven with a mix of plans

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The expansion off steel wire should be the same as the refractory, it is with concrete anyhow. Because the wire is on the outside it is likely to be in tension as the refractory expands and the wire is cooler. Once the wire heats it should go slack and probably stretch and therefore not return to it's original length leaving it useful for the first heating cycle only. This is what happens with kilns that are held together with threaded rod and angle iron. They need to be tensioned up from time to time, but you won't have this option and your wire is far more stretchy than 10mm rod.


I guess I was not clear enough. It will not be in tension nor will it be on the outside I plan on it being in the concrete as a structural additive when I add the perlite layer.

But after more research and the gracious input in this forum I'm making a few adjustments.

Thanks Gianni, your right I have a picture in my head of what I want I just need to figure out how to combine the ascetics I want with the integrity of the tried and true methods. After all salvo did make a living building AND repairing them. Repair being the key word.

I'll keep you all posted.
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