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  #111  
Old 11-25-2013, 01:04 PM
david s's Avatar
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Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
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Default Re: New 36inch castable build in Brisbane

In that case use some old, rusty second hand bits of corrugated iron that're full of holes.
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  #112  
Old 11-25-2013, 01:13 PM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Japan
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Default Re: New 36inch castable build in Brisbane

David,
That sure does not say much for Australian natural resources.

I'm not talking about "dumpster diving"!

But, it is a good source of discarded good materials, if a person is sharp with their eye and a little creative.
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  #113  
Old 11-26-2013, 02:07 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Brisbane Australia
Posts: 127
Default Re: New 36inch castable build in Brisbane

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Originally Posted by mikku View Post
I read the description of Australian architecture that you referenced. It really does not say much except that the style was developed, really to match the availability of building materials, building equipment, and climate. That is true for most places in the world.

If you were a purist, you would not have built a WFO at all.

But since that is not the case, you need to follow the "reasoning behind" the architecture that has evolved.
The architecture style, does have other attributes other then you mentioned, including high ceilings, steep central roofing, and I did say a modern-ish Queenslander. Using the outside as extra living space and some of the other older design attributes have been used. I think wfo was all that was used by previous generations, until gas was piped through our towns and cities. No purism needed.

Quote:
Large overhangs were made to allow the residents to enjoy outdoor living even though it rained a lot or was very hot. So extending a roof to cover your oven would be exactly in the theme of the original home builder's style.


Using materials for your build that are "locally abundant" is keeping the tradition alive.
Yes but would wreck the look. Most of the big trees are gone now, so a true representation of the past "locally abundant" bits need to be made from different materials. Glue technology and composite materials, Steel, and evolving design take over. I am still not going to put a roof on it.

Steve
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  #114  
Old 11-26-2013, 02:43 AM
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Location: Brisbane Australia
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Default Re: New 36inch castable build in Brisbane

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Originally Posted by david s View Post
In that case use some old, rusty second hand bits of corrugated iron that're full of holes.
No thanks. As an ex plumber - in my early years I had to short sheet roofs to stop the leaking at the rusted overlaps etc.

Actually the old sheeting was good, it had thick galvanising. The sheets around the war years had different technology, thinner coatings and rusted a lot more.

Current technology is better again mixing an inert material (aluminium) with the protective sacrificial galvanising coating. It should last us out.

Last edited by brissie; 11-26-2013 at 02:48 AM.
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  #115  
Old 11-26-2013, 03:08 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Japan
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Default Re: New 36inch castable build in Brisbane

Japan has a lot of metal roofing materials. The good old copper roofs are fine but do not last that long now that there is so much acid rain falling here from sources in China.

There galvalume a hybrid coating on steel that lasts a considerable amount of time--but it still deteriorates. A lot of roofs use colored galvalume but the paint requires re-doing initially after maybe 10 years; then recoating is required again and again on decreasingly shorter schedules.

If you want a very good roof, then it would be stainless or colored stainless. The stainless is a lifetime roof--many times over; but the colored stainless still needs coating to keep up the color--not to prevent deterioration of the roof.

All these are available in a standing seam style called "kawara-bow" or a horizontal lap type--I don't know the Japan name for it.

Any of these would make a nice airy--light appearing roof for any structure.

You can coat masonry all you want with all types of hybrid coatings but water seems to find it's way in. The off side to coating is that once you get water inside, it is difficult getting it out! So best policy is to keep it dry from the beginning!

It is not only keeping the water away, it is making the oven usable during all different times or weather conditions. Anyone with a tight schedule would appreciate being able to use a WFO whenever the opportunity arises.

I can preach this idea until the cows come home, but the words have to fall on receptive ears OR the oven has to get soaked a few times, requiring extended drying out fires to make it functional again before one becomes a believer.

Whatever, the sermon is over! Praise be! And now the congregation can go home and enjoy their WFO's in peace!
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  #116  
Old 11-26-2013, 03:14 AM
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Default Re: New 36inch castable build in Brisbane

Quote:
Originally Posted by brissie View Post
The architecture style, does have other attributes other then you mentioned, including high ceilings, steep central roofing, and I did say a modern-ish Queenslander. Using the outside as extra living space and some of the other older design attributes have been used. I think wfo was all that was used by previous generations, until gas was piped through our towns and cities. No purism needed.



Yes but would wreck the look. Most of the big trees are gone now, so a true representation of the past "locally abundant" bits need to be made from different materials. Glue technology and composite materials, Steel, and evolving design take over. I am still not going to put a roof on it.

Steve
So, how did the previous generations incorporate a wfo into their homes to keep the style intact? Do you have any photos of old wfo's --I would think that they would be more central to the kitchen and totally enclosed because you would have to rely on them every single day for all their cooking needs!
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  #117  
Old 11-26-2013, 03:53 AM
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Default Re: New 36inch castable build in Brisbane

In the nineteenth century rural Australian homes in Queensland (northern state and therefore very hot) often had their kitchens partially detached from the main house. It was a separate building, presumably so that the wood stove did not heat the house during the summer and probably also as some fire protection measure.the wood stoves were usually cast iron and incorporated hot plates, water heating and an oven. In the cooler southern states the kitchens were usually incorporated into the main building.
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  #118  
Old 11-26-2013, 03:59 AM
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Location: Brisbane Australia
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Default Re: New 36inch castable build in Brisbane

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikku View Post
So, how did the previous generations incorporate a wfo into their homes to keep the style intact? Do you have any photos of old wfo's --I would think that they would be more central to the kitchen and totally enclosed because you would have to rely on them every single day for all their cooking needs!
Antique Stove | eBay

Many still exist, and can be found on ebay Aus. Most are cast iron, with enamel coatings. Many also functioned as hot water heaters and plumbed into the bathroom and kitchen sink etc. They where generally fired all the time.

The kitchen was often the hub of the house, even though they where not designed for this purpose.

Earlier times people had built in masonry ovens. Some still exist in older homes. Not the same design as a modern wfo though.

Large homes often had a separate out building for cooking. Saves burning down the main house.
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  #119  
Old 11-26-2013, 04:08 AM
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Default Re: New 36inch castable build in Brisbane

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikku View Post
So, how did the previous generations incorporate a wfo into their homes to keep the style intact? Do you have any photos of old wfo's --I would think that they would be more central to the kitchen and totally enclosed because you would have to rely on them every single day for all their cooking needs!
Gudday
The WFO in kitchens in Australia were at first a chimney open fire affair that was detached from the house in a separate room, due to the heat.
My grandmother had such a kitchen , great in winter , but a a sweat box in the summer months , her oven was a cast iron, ceramic brick lined ? Beastie that took only her , expertise to operate . We took our meals to the other parts of the house, due to the heat . But now days we tend to eat 'out doors' regardless of were it is cooked, and most houses now days have an outside eating area.
Regards davr
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  #120  
Old 11-26-2013, 04:34 AM
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Default Re: New 36inch castable build in Brisbane

My grandmother had a huge wood stove in the house in town, before moving out into the country. During the summer months, all the baking and stuff was done in the evening when it was cooler. But these stoves were the cast iron type-- used at the beginning of the 20th Century... (That was Northern Minnesota USA).

At one time, I remember my grandmother telling about seeing UFO's during the summer months when she was baking---I really think it was some signs of heat stroke from working around a hot wood stove!

My other grandmother had a similar set up but the family was much larger with 16 siblings! As the children were growing up, their chores were taking care of all the things running a huge farm in southern Minnesota. That was cattle, chickens, pigs, and of course grains and hay. Actually the operation covered several farms because the age of the children was so different--some still toddlers while others were adults managing the other farms!

But all the wood stoves with ovens had roofs over them---that is the point of my "sermon on roofs".

I am glad so many of you have a history of wood stoves going back to your childhood.

So Steve, what do you think?
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