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v6passat 12-31-2010 02:48 PM

Damp Oven
 
Hi, new to forum and looking for assistance. I built an oven a few months back and left it exposed to elements. As it was not water proofed where the flute meets the oven it is now damp inside. I have since fixed this by making a custom tarp that still lets the oven breath and used a rubber boot to seal the flute around the tarp. My question is, what is the best way to dry out the oven...is it as simple as firing it up for a few hours? the oven is made of refractory bricks, is well insulated and rendered. I know its a silly question, but i thought its worthwhile making sure. Thanks in advance, Sam.

cobblerdave 01-04-2011 12:38 PM

Re: Damp Oven
 
Hi
Just about all in brisbane wood have this problem I recon. I think myself thinkthe main prob with mine is the hearth extends into the entrance way the rain will always fall on this and the firebricks are sooo porus with a layer of highly porus insulation underneath. Doesn't take much rain and the ovens damp. If I had my time again an ash drop at the entrance to the oven to break the path of the water wicking back into the oven but thats 50/50 hindsight and will not happen. Ive added a piece of door window flashing over the entrance help only a little so now i will fashion some sort of cover/entracnce door? to keep the rain.
All my thought are open to all suggestions at this time and the only good one i can add at this time is that Golden cane fronds burn really well and I burn all the neighbors and mine as a fuel source to dry the oven out. the little curses must have a high oil content cause boy those babies burn (neighbours love ya to ). makes heaps and heaps of ash though
regards dave

david s 01-04-2011 01:28 PM

Re: Damp Oven
 
We have the same problem up here in Townsville. If you've waterproofed your oven it will keep out a fair amount, but you still need to dry it again. You don't need to go back to the original slow drying fires that are required when you built it. We've been away in Europe for 10 weeks and our oven was damp, so I gave it an extra 2 Hrs of slow fire, the outside was really hot but there was no damage and the next time we used it it fired normally again. The rain hasn't stopped so will probably have to repeat the process.

v6passat 01-04-2011 05:41 PM

Re: Damp Oven
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by cobblerdave (Post 105217)
Hi
Just about all in brisbane wood have this problem I recon. I think myself thinkthe main prob with mine is the hearth extends into the entrance way the rain will always fall on this and the firebricks are sooo porus with a layer of highly porus insulation underneath. Doesn't take much rain and the ovens damp. If I had my time again an ash drop at the entrance to the oven to break the path of the water wicking back into the oven but thats 50/50 hindsight and will not happen. Ive added a piece of door window flashing over the entrance help only a little so now i will fashion some sort of cover/entracnce door? to keep the rain.
All my thought are open to all suggestions at this time and the only good one i can add at this time is that Golden cane fronds burn really well and I burn all the neighbors and mine as a fuel source to dry the oven out. the little curses must have a high oil content cause boy those babies burn (neighbours love ya to ). makes heaps and heaps of ash though
regards dave

thanks Dave. I bought this product called fyre mastic (clipsal brand) and have sealed around the flue and render. Its not suitable for permanent water immersion BUT will do the job in this case. Its painable and heat resistant to very high temps. Thanks for your response. Cheers Sam

v6passat 01-04-2011 05:42 PM

Re: Damp Oven
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by david s (Post 105218)
We have the same problem up here in Townsville. If you've waterproofed your oven it will keep out a fair amount, but you still need to dry it again. You don't need to go back to the original slow drying fires that are required when you built it. We've been away in Europe for 10 weeks and our oven was damp, so I gave it an extra 2 Hrs of slow fire, the outside was really hot but there was no damage and the next time we used it it fired normally again. The rain hasn't stopped so will probably have to repeat the process.

Cheers and good luck...hopefully the rain will stop soon!


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