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  #21  
Old 01-09-2011, 07:48 AM
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Thumbs up Re: Wood Fired Ovens in Conneticut!

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Originally Posted by Aegis View Post
How long are your firing times? And how long does the heat stay retained? General times and temps would be great! It would give me a better Idea of thermal mass.....snip....
John, you will find some data points (read firing times) from different members with different mass configurations here (Poll: How big is your Wood Fired Oven?). More mass in the floor means more heat up time and less oven use overall.
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  #22  
Old 01-12-2011, 04:47 PM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Ovens in Conneticut!

Thanks Lee,
I just got done going through the thread and it has a lot of good info! Thanks for pointing me in that direction! I am sure all of my questions are answered here time and time again! It just takes a lot of reading to find the answers, but by the time I find the answer I forgot the question! Anyway the 30" of snow here gave me some time to read (after the shoveling & plowing was done) I maybe settling in on laying my hearth bricks on edge and leaving that as a little extra thermal mass. I was toying with the idea of cutting the chain bricks to 6" and 3" pieces instead of cutting them in half. My thought would be to use one 6" brick then two 3" bricks then a 6" so on around the chain. This would increase my dome mass by 33% while not adding to the price of using a refractory mortar or refractory concrete. Firebrick is relatively inexpensive compared to heat stop 50 Anyway I have scuttled that idea for now and will only increase my hearth mass. It would seem to me the hearth being 4.5" thick (bricks laid on edge) is in keeping with the walls of the dome.
Again Thanks
John
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  #23  
Old 01-12-2011, 08:21 PM
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Thumbs up Re: Wood Fired Ovens in Conneticut!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aegis View Post
Thanks Lee,
I just got done going through the thread and it has a lot of good info! Thanks for pointing me in that direction! I am sure all of my questions are answered here time and time again! It just takes a lot of reading to find the answers, but by the time I find the answer I forgot the question! Anyway the 30" of snow here gave me some time to read (after the shoveling & plowing was done) I maybe settling in on laying my hearth bricks on edge and leaving that as a little extra thermal mass. I was toying with the idea of cutting the chain bricks to 6" and 3" pieces instead of cutting them in half. My thought would be to use one 6" brick then two 3" bricks then a 6" so on around the chain. This would increase my dome mass by 33% while not adding to the price of using a refractory mortar or refractory concrete. Firebrick is relatively inexpensive compared to heat stop 50 Anyway I have scuttled that idea for now and will only increase my hearth mass. It would seem to me the hearth being 4.5" thick (bricks laid on edge) is in keeping with the walls of the dome.
Again Thanks
John
Must be a common phase to us newbies....I went through a similar period were I considered extra mass here and there. I'm planning now to build the pompeii oven like the current plans show. Those plans have been tweaked again and again and represent a good all around approach for reliable success for ordinary guys like me.

With a 2.5 inch oven floor, insulation under that floor, and the 4.5 inch dome with four inches of ceramic insulation, you should be able to bake bread the day after pizza. BTW, Some of the ovens in that thread you read are not insulated as well (especially under the oven floor) or made like the current plans (some are barrel ovens).
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Last edited by Lburou; 01-12-2011 at 08:41 PM.
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  #24  
Old 01-28-2011, 06:28 PM
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Thumbs up Re: Wood Fired Ovens in Conneticut!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aegis View Post
Thanks Lee,
I just got done going through the thread and it has a lot of good info! Thanks for pointing me in that direction! I am sure all of my questions are answered here time and time again! It just takes a lot of reading to find the answers, but by the time I find the answer I forgot the question! Anyway the 30" of snow here gave me some time to read (after the shoveling & plowing was done) I maybe settling in on laying my hearth bricks on edge and leaving that as a little extra thermal mass. I was toying with the idea of cutting the chain bricks to 6" and 3" pieces instead of cutting them in half. My thought would be to use one 6" brick then two 3" bricks then a 6" so on around the chain. This would increase my dome mass by 33% while not adding to the price of using a refractory mortar or refractory concrete. Firebrick is relatively inexpensive compared to heat stop 50 Anyway I have scuttled that idea for now and will only increase my hearth mass. It would seem to me the hearth being 4.5" thick (bricks laid on edge) is in keeping with the walls of the dome.
Again Thanks
John
After some private advice from long time members here, I bought an extra two inches of rigid insulation for my oven floor, that insulation will be 4" thick. I'm hoping that increased insulation in the floor will make more than an academic difference in retaining heat and shortening heat up cycles. Time will tell.

As a side note. I aslo purchased some Insulating Fire Brick (IFB) today. And, unless the old timers here talk me out of it, I plan to circle the inner arch with these insulated bricks -so my oven door will touch only IFB. Hopefully, that will slow heat loss out of the dome toward the oven landing. Anybody have any thought about using IFB?

It was 78 degrees here today
Same forecast tomorrow, will cut some bricks

Any news on your project John?

I've decided to go with a clear dome and infra red thermometer instead of thermocouple or EGT gage.
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If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is
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Last edited by Lburou; 01-29-2011 at 06:18 AM.
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  #25  
Old 01-29-2011, 05:15 AM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Ovens in Conneticut!

Hello Lee,
After reading many many times, insulate, insulate, insulate! I think I finally got it. So much so I am going to scale down the size of the oven a bit (42" to 40" round) to allow for extra insulation on the sides of the dome.
Interesting you mention Insulating firebrick as I was trying to figure what was the best way to make a thermal break from the oven to the entrance way. I will be looking for feedback on this one for sure!
As for my project I am working on thermocouple control central! LOL I know it is a waste of time, money and effort to a great degree, but instaed of 78 degree temps. I have almost 78" of snow piled up in the driveway and deck!!!! OMG! thanks goodness I way over built the deck! 2*10 every 12" for the joists and 2*12's doubled for the beams.
Oh, after the thermocouple control box I wil work on an indespensable tool and look at a glass door. I saw the door jcg31 built and my wife loves it! She also thinks I should ask someone to make it since I am spending way too much time with snow removal! She does have a point, hope she doesn't read this post! lol I'll never hear the end of it!
As you can tell I am jealous of the 78 degrees you are suffering though!
Good Luck on the build!
John
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  #26  
Old 01-29-2011, 06:09 AM
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Thumbs up Thermocouple University....Soon to open for research :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aegis View Post
Hello Lee,
After reading many many times, insulate, insulate, insulate! I think I finally got it. So much so I am going to scale down the size of the oven a bit (42" to 40" round) to allow for extra insulation on the sides of the dome.
Interesting you mention Insulating firebrick as I was trying to figure what was the best way to make a thermal break from the oven to the entrance way. I will be looking for feedback on this one for sure!
As for my project I am working on thermocouple control central! LOL I know it is a waste of time, money and effort to a great degree, but instaed of 78 degree temps. I have almost 78" of snow piled up in the driveway and deck!!!! OMG! thanks goodness I way over built the deck! 2*10 every 12" for the joists and 2*12's doubled for the beams.
Oh, after the thermocouple control box I wil work on an indespensable tool and look at a glass door. I saw the door jcg31 built and my wife loves it! She also thinks I should ask someone to make it since I am spending way too much time with snow removal! She does have a point, hope she doesn't read this post! lol I'll never hear the end of it!
As you can tell I am jealous of the 78 degrees you are suffering though!
Good Luck on the build!
John
Life goes on John....Even in deep snow, its amazing. Some of my best memories as a youngster in Wyoming and Nebraska are of blizzard days and staying home from school, then digging snow tunnels and making snow balls and snow forts. No more for me. We moved here because the cold bothers us more than the heat at our age. Enjoy the solitude the snow gives....Spring is coming

I havent found an oven build using IFB on FB.com for the use I am proposing. I'm open minded about it at this time and a respected senior member could talk me out of it if its a bad idea.

Thing I noticed unloading the IFB is that it is VERY light weight and surprisingly SOFT. In my sleeplessness last night, I grew concerned that the IFB surface on the oven floor or at the edges of the doorway would scar easily with peel and pan traffic. Will have to work that out until I can feel warm and fuzzy about that risk. All WFO designs lose a lot of heat out the front door and I want to slow the -after pizza- heat loss with a good door and, hopefully, a successful design to incorporate IFB in the landing structure.......If you old timers have any thoughts on this, they are welcome!

Well, you can be the thermocouple king, that is what freedom is all about. No doubt we will both have flashbacks to critique our own builds and when its done, you can share your thermocouple University degree with the FornoBravo Community and then we'll ALL know what you learn.

Regards,
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If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is
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  #27  
Old 01-29-2011, 07:00 AM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Ovens in Conneticut!

Quote:
As a side note. I aslo purchased some Insulating Fire Brick (IFB) today. And, unless the old timers here talk me out of it, I plan to circle the inner arch with these insulated bricks -so my oven door will touch only IFB. Hopefully, that will slow heat loss out of the dome toward the oven landing. Anybody have any thought about using IFB?
Insulating fire brick is insulation. I'd think long and hard before exposing any insulation to the interior (or exterior) of the oven, although in this case the insulation is made of the same stuff as the firebricks, and what flakes off is not a super health hazard, like some other refractory products might be.

If using it as anything more than a thermal break, keep in mind that it has the same thermal insulation value as vermiculite concrete, and you need the same thicknesses to be effective.
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  #28  
Old 01-29-2011, 07:09 AM
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Default Re: Thermocouple University....Soon to open for research :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lburou View Post
Life goes on John....Even in deep snow, its amazing. Some of my best memories as a youngster in Wyoming and Nebraska are of blizzard days and staying home from school, then digging snow tunnels and making snow balls and snow forts. No more for me. We moved here because the cold bothers us more than the heat at our age. Enjoy the solitude the snow gives....Spring is coming
It is amazing how more heat tolerant us Old Timers get, we bought a place in Georgia last year and are renting it out until retirement. Below, are a couple of pics of my recent oven build! LOL
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lburou View Post
I havent found an oven build using IFB on FB.com for the use I am proposing. I'm open minded about it at this time and a respected senior member could talk me out of it if its a bad idea.
Thing I noticed unloading the IFB is that it is VERY light weight and surprisingly SOFT. In my sleeplessness last night, I grew concerned that the IFB surface on the oven floor or at the edges of the doorway would scar easily with peel and pan traffic. Will have to work that out until I can feel warm and fuzzy about that risk. All WFO designs lose a lot of heat out the front door and I want to slow the -after pizza- heat loss with a good door and, hopefully, a successful design to incorporate IFB in the landing structure.......If you old timers have any thoughts on this, they are welcome!
I am sure you meant to say the more experienced builders on the forum
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lburou View Post
Well, you can be the thermocouple king, that is what freedom is all about. No doubt we will both have flashbacks to critique our own builds and when its done, you can share your thermocouple University degree with the FornoBravo Community and then we'll ALL know what you learn.

Regards,
I am not sure about the king thing, but I will hopefully get a lot of useful data from all the measurements that will be taken. if any highly experienced or knowledgable builders (anyone with an opinion) have advice on placement, I have about three months to make those choices. All suggestions welcomed!
Now, where was I? oh yes, getting the plow truck started! Vroomm!
Attached Thumbnails
Wood Fired Ovens in Conneticut!-snowedoven1.jpg   Wood Fired Ovens in Conneticut!-winteroven2.jpg  
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  #29  
Old 01-31-2011, 05:24 PM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Ovens in Conneticut!

Aegis,
I'am here in winter wonder land of connecticut, thinking about building my owen oven this spring.
Looks like a lot of work!!!
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  #30  
Old 02-02-2011, 05:02 PM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Ovens in Conneticut!

Hi Pisani,
It all depends on your definition of "a lot" lol I did a full patio along with it which took a lot of time and all manual labor with a one man show to boot! The oven so far really hasn't been too bad. I think I may have gotten it done in one season had I started in the spring and didn't have the patio to do. Where in Ct. are you located? coast inland, litchfield hills? If you think you want to build one, you won't be sorry!
Good Luck
John
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