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  #21  
Old 09-15-2013, 01:52 PM
david s's Avatar
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Default Re: What about using starch based packing peanuts for insulation instead of vermiculi

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Originally Posted by cobblerdave View Post
Gudday Davids
You right there.... But in your climate just as mine it just would not work.
Regards Dave
It works fine, but you need to keep it dry.Ok for dome insulation.But I wouldn't use it under the floor.
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  #22  
Old 09-26-2013, 06:33 AM
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Default Re: What about using starch based packing peanuts for insulation instead of vermiculi

Interesting idea. My concern with using foam concrete as insulation would be off-gassing of the chemicals especially in an area under the floor. I would think that would happen even more rapidly during oven use too.
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  #23  
Old 09-26-2013, 12:27 PM
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Default Re: What about using starch based packing peanuts for insulation instead of vermiculi

In the production of Hebel they use aluminium powder that reacts with the lime to produce hydrogen, which then bubbles through the mix to froth it up. The process is very secretive and access to their factory is really difficult. By the time the product reaches market there is no trace of hydrogen left. I should imagine that foamcrete would be the same. It is the physical properties of the detergent like stuff that creates the foam, the bubbles are filled with air and only a minuscule amount of the concentrate is required. The concentrate makes 1000 times its volume and is itself 75% water. Check the foamcrete thread, the chemical composition of the stuff is there.

I toyed around with using cellulose powder in place of cement to make vermicrete, but gave up as it's not economical.Also discovered in researching this stuff that it is widely used in foods. They add the stuff to grated cheese to prevent it from clumping when frozen.It is basically wood fibres.

Last edited by david s; 09-26-2013 at 03:16 PM.
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  #24  
Old 11-30-2013, 05:08 PM
Serf
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: topsfield, ma
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Default Re: What about using starch based packing peanuts for insulation instead of vermiculi

In eastern ma see griffin greenhouse supply for vermiculite
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  #25  
Old 12-01-2013, 01:06 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Queensland Australia
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Default Re: What about using starch based packing peanuts for insulation instead of vermiculi

Back in the olden days ( 1970s) we used to make foam concrete by adding aluminium powder to concrete to make it foam. Regarding the peanut shells has anyone considered charcoal which is way was used in Aladdin thermos flasks
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  #26  
Old 12-01-2013, 06:00 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: topsfield, ma
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Default Re: What about using starch based packing peanuts for insulation instead of vermiculi

Griffin greenhouse in Tewksbury mass for vermiculite
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