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  #11  
Old 01-30-2013, 06:15 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Spokane, Washington
Posts: 26
Default Re: Soapstone Oven Floor

36" oven plus 9" to reach out to the outside of the oven plus the throat. I've built 5 so far. How about you. I think I know how many it takes. How many ovens have you built and how many customers have you had constant feedback from for 3-4 years on a monthly basis? Every single one started with fire bricks, and every one has since had us add soapstone. Every single one is much happier with cooking performance and ease of cleaning, maintenance, and heat retention over the fire bricks. Why would you want to cook on porous bricks and dozens of seams, when, if you can afford it, soapstone has two seams.

I'm not saying your opinion doesn't count, but your opinion and mine are different and that's what this person asked for. Opinions. I gave mine, you don't agree with it or like it. So be it. Hope your oven is what you like and enjoy. I know the ones I've built make their owners happy several times a week.
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  #12  
Old 01-30-2013, 06:29 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Detroit
Posts: 400
Default Re: Soapstone Oven Floor

Here is the floor from the CAD drawing of my most recent oven. By my rough count it would take about 36 Full Bricks to make this floor as Drawn, and this is a 42" oven. For some reason I feel like I ended up using 38, but would have to check my records. Regardless, far from 60-80.
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  #13  
Old 01-30-2013, 06:34 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 3,128
Default Re: Soapstone Oven Floor

I would use soapstone brick in a minute if they were at all cost competitive, but the difference in thermal characteristics is not worth the premium (unless money is no object, of course).

Note that I said "brick" not "slab", I prefer my cracks to be pre-engineered.
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  #14  
Old 01-30-2013, 06:42 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Spokane, Washington
Posts: 26
Default Re: Soapstone Oven Floor

Quote:
Originally Posted by shuboyje View Post
Here is the floor from the CAD drawing of my most recent oven. By my rough count it would take about 36 Full Bricks to make this floor as Drawn, and this is a 42" oven. For some reason I feel like I ended up using 38, but would have to check my records. Regardless, far from 60-80.
We run our fire brick out the throat also. Ours is also 45" possibly a tad bigger. We used more on the first oven because the homeowner wanted the brick to extend out to cover the entire deck. Against our judgement and recommendations. Why is everyone so concerned and obsessed with proving my number wrong? I don't understand lol. I am just saying how many we have used.
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  #15  
Old 01-30-2013, 06:45 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Spokane, Washington
Posts: 26
Default Re: Soapstone Oven Floor

I just looked up a photo of the last one we built, and counted 57 bricks plus partials. No cad drawing. No math. Counting what we used.
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  #16  
Old 01-30-2013, 07:01 PM
deejayoh's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,398
Default Re: Soapstone Oven Floor

My math is not based on opinions. It's based on math. That's the awesome thing about math, it is not subject to opinion.

Perhaps you are using smaller bricks.

If you're trying to drum up business here, I'm not sure you're helping your business by being so prickly.

there are hundreds of ovens built here, and maybe one or two that use soapstone. The cost is the issue. Glad you are having success selling them. To the original poster's question - I stand by my advice - which is that its a lot more money for an uncertain performance benefit.
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Last edited by deejayoh; 01-30-2013 at 07:07 PM.
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  #17  
Old 01-30-2013, 07:07 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Detroit
Posts: 400
Default Re: Soapstone Oven Floor

I'm so with you. I can't even tell you how many times I've drooled over the soapstone firebricks Texiera sells.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
I would use soapstone brick in a minute if they were at all cost competitive, but the difference in thermal characteristics is not worth the premium (unless money is no object, of course).

Note that I said "brick" not "slab", I prefer my cracks to be pre-engineered.
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  #18  
Old 01-30-2013, 07:07 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 3,128
Default Re: Soapstone Oven Floor

Being porous is not an issue in the dome, that is the beauty of building a fire directly on the surface: It is clean and sterile every time, no matter what kind of gunk you manage to embed into it. If you are getting water into the dome surface, you have issues not related to the material itself.
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  #19  
Old 01-30-2013, 07:51 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Spokane, Washington
Posts: 26
Default Re: Soapstone Oven Floor

Quote:
Originally Posted by deejayoh View Post
My math is not based on opinions. It's based on math. That's the awesome thing about math, it is not subject to opinion.

Perhaps you are using smaller bricks.

If you're trying to drum up business here, I'm not sure you're helping your business by being so prickly.

there are hundreds of ovens built here, and maybe one or two that use soapstone. The cost is the issue. Glad you are having success selling them. To the original poster's question - I stand by my advice - which is that its a lot more money for an uncertain performance benefit.

Lol. I'm not being prickly. I counted the brick I used. It adds up to what I stated. As for it being an uncertain performance benefit, that is completely dependent on the owner. The ones I've done swear by it and love it. I shop for the best price for them when building these ovens. I found a recent returned counter top for $250 that I could have bought and used for the floor in our next one. I didn't buy it because we won't build it until spring. I also found a slab that would have done six ovens for $2400. I didn't buy it because I don't have money laying around. My customers all cooked on firebrick before we installed the soapstone, and after swore they'd never go back. Firebricks have a pretty varied density, in my limited experience, and can lead to hotter and cooler spots. The soapstone is almost perfectly even everywhere we've cooked. The fire brick also worried one of my customers because he uses big pots and was worried about damaging the bricks and getting that wonderful grit in his food when he cooked pizzas.


I started using soapstone in my own electric oven and it took 4 minutes off of a ten minute cook time, and the crust is far better than it was on my ceramic stone. I paid $40 for two 3cm stones one inch smaller than my ovens. Deals can be had is my point. Until you cook on soapstone you can't say for sure what its worth. What if you found it for $200? Would you go buy it to try it? $400? $600? Where the line of cost is up to each person. I didnt make my customers use it, they talked to the others who had and decided it was worth it. Its like granite counter tops in a home. Do you need them? Probably not. Do most people want them? Most i know do. As for soapstone, will I use it in my own oven? Maybe. If I can afford it. I don't have the bank accounts my customers have. Maybe if more people knew how easy it is to add to an oven and how nice it is to cook on, they would save up and buy it. From my experience, I like it much, much better than cooking on firebrick with joints all over. That's it. If you've used it and didn't like it, that's cool. I'm not trying to say go buy it. I am just saying I have used it and think its wonderful. Cost and all.
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  #20  
Old 01-30-2013, 07:57 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Spokane, Washington
Posts: 26
Default Re: Soapstone Oven Floor

Quote:
Originally Posted by shuboyje View Post
I'm so with you. I can't even tell you how many times I've drooled over the soapstone firebricks Texiera sells.
If you want "bricks", I could possibly get you pieces probably for almost free. They are scraps from countertops and get thrown away by a counter top place here. They would only be around the size of sink cutouts and smaller. Have you checked with any counter shops in your area? They'd probably only be 3cm thick, but I bet you could find them for next to nothing. Thats how this we use. You can cut them yourself with a tile saw or even a skillsaw with a masonry blade and just sand the corners off so they aren't sharp and chip.
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