#11  
Old 10-31-2011, 08:48 PM
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Default Re: High Medium & Low Fire Brick Data

Read the posts above, the rating is all about resistance to abrasion.

Heat in = heat out, it cant get any simpler than that.
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  #12  
Old 10-31-2011, 09:07 PM
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Default Re: High Medium & Low Fire Brick Data

Quote:
Originally Posted by brickie in oz View Post
Read the posts above, the rating is all about resistance to abrasion.

Heat in = heat out, it cant get any simpler than that.
oddly enough, i did read the above posts which is why i am asking in the first place....

"High duty fire brick. These brick have very high alumina content, get very hot (1500F and up) and are designed for continual high-heat applications, such as furnaces. They are expensive, and will get too hot for some of your oven uses, such as baking bread and roasting. In general, pizza wants heat between 750F and 900F, while bread and roasts cooks best between 500F and 600F. (Note that brick ovens are able to cook at higher temperatures without burning because of the moist heat inside the oven and shorter cooking times.)"

from the forno bravo brick primer

Last edited by tngabe; 10-31-2011 at 09:13 PM.
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  #13  
Old 10-31-2011, 09:29 PM
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Default Re: High Medium & Low Fire Brick Data

Quote:
Originally Posted by tngabe View Post

"High duty fire brick. These brick have very high alumina content, get very hot (1500F and up) and are designed for continual high-heat applications, such as furnaces. They are expensive, and will get too hot for some of your oven uses, such as baking bread and roasting. In general, pizza wants heat between 750F and 900F, while bread and roasts cooks best between 500F and 600F. (Note that brick ovens are able to cook at higher temperatures without burning because of the moist heat inside the oven and shorter cooking times.)"
No material can get hotter than the energy put into it, it goes against all physics.
If you come across some you will be a $Gazillionaire instantly.
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  #14  
Old 10-31-2011, 09:49 PM
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Default Re: High Medium & Low Fire Brick Data

that's what i was thinking, but didn't want to question the infalliable forno bravo!

looks like i'll be getting some 12x12 high duties!
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Old 11-01-2011, 12:49 AM
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Default Re: High Medium & Low Fire Brick Data

The higher duty bricks are capable of withstanding greater thermal shock. In the case of a WFO the temp reached is not particularly high, but the rate of increase is. It is this fast temp rise that does the damage.
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Old 11-01-2011, 06:56 PM
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Default Re: High Medium & Low Fire Brick Data

Quote:
Originally Posted by brickie in oz View Post
I thought it referred to the wear duty of the brick, light duty is a soft brick, medium duty is a medium duty brick, and high duty is a hard brick capable of taking some punishment.
WRONG, light duty is in the 18-20% alumina range, med.duty is 20-35% alumina, and high duty is in the 42% and upwards range. The duty is not related to wear factors at all. All of these bricks are dense bricks, the light weight bricks are insulation bricks.
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  #17  
Old 11-01-2011, 07:00 PM
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Default Re: High Medium & Low Fire Brick Data

Quote:
Originally Posted by david s View Post
The higher duty bricks are capable of withstanding greater thermal shock. In the case of a WFO the temp reached is not particularly high, but the rate of increase is. It is this fast temp rise that does the damage.
Actually insulation bricks have the greatest thermal shock resitance..The temperature we cook at is at the bottom end of the range for fire bricks, they are fired at 1350c, so 350c is nothing to them.
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Old 11-01-2011, 07:20 PM
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Default Re: High Medium & Low Fire Brick Data

Quote:
looks like i'll be getting some 12x12 high duties!
I would be most interested in finding out how a high-duty floor brick will perform along with a low-duty dome brick, much as a soapstone floor might with a firebrick dome.
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  #19  
Old 11-01-2011, 07:33 PM
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Default Re: High Medium & Low Fire Brick Data

from looking at the turtlerockheat webpage, i'm pretty sure that's how he builds them. there is a large oven he built near ashevile i'm hoping to go check out.
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  #20  
Old 03-07-2012, 09:51 PM
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Default Re: High Medium & Low Fire Brick Data

So in my area I can really only find one supplier of firebrick. I asked them for a spec/data sheet and they didn't have one so I called the manufacturer and received one by email in a few minutes. The contents percentages are different so can someone tell me what they think about it. I am attaching a picture of the percentages below.

Thanks in advance for any input.

Nate
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High Medium & Low Fire Brick Data-firebrick-contents.jpg  
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