#11  
Old 11-13-2010, 09:44 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Pensacola, Florida
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Default Re: Countertops

Thanks Dave and Neil. Your finished products are truly impressive. I appreciate the "how to" process Neil, I'll definitely do a series of test pieces to get a feel for it. I'll be thrilled to get a finish even close to the both of you.
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  #12  
Old 11-18-2010, 11:27 AM
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Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Vancouver Island BC
Posts: 78
Default Re: Countertops

We have pictures on our thread that might help as well.
ttp://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/pompeii-nanoose-bay-14633.html

Good luck!

Karen
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  #13  
Old 11-20-2010, 06:40 AM
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Location: Pensacola, Florida
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Default Re: Countertops

Thanks Karen. You and Dave have done a masterful job on your WFO. It's nice to see how a real mason does it. I learned a great deal from your thread including the use of "navvy-jack". I had never heard of that before, but I'll definately see if the local yards have it and use the mixture on my test pieces. Thanks again.

Leigh
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  #14  
Old 11-20-2010, 01:49 PM
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Location: Vancouver Island
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Default Re: Countertops

Take a close look at your navy jack or aggregate. Lots of the local yards unfortunately have junk.

Avoid aggregate made from crushing blast rock. If all the larger aggregate size particles have all faces as fracture faces don't use it. This stuff makes weak concrete and small particles will always be spalling from the finished surface. Use this stuff for patios and driveways where surface finish is not critical.

Ideally, the aggregate should be made with crushed natural gravel, with no more that two fracture faces on each stone. Bagged pre-mix brand name concrete is made of this material. For the small amount of concrete needed for counter tops, and the large number of hours you will be investing, don't scrimp on the concrete quality.

Last edited by Neil2; 11-20-2010 at 01:56 PM.
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  #15  
Old 11-20-2010, 01:58 PM
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In British Columbia, "navvy jack" is a common term in construction and landscaping trades and in their respective supply stores for washed pea gravel used for fill and drainage purposes. The usage derives from "Navvy Jack", by ordinary name Jack Thomas, a former navvy who used a rowboat to mine good-quality gravel from beaches in West Vancouver, and who as time went on ran a rowboat-ferry for settlers on Burrard Inlet and English Bay. (wikkipedia)

Sometimes the term is used (incorrectly) for concrete aggregate.

Last edited by Neil2; 11-20-2010 at 02:01 PM.
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  #16  
Old 11-20-2010, 02:07 PM
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Default Re: Countertops

Unless I am misunderstanding you and the material, you are mistaken. The best aggregate for concrete is fractured-face, i.e. sharp or crushed material, not rounded aggregate.
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  #17  
Old 11-21-2010, 01:29 PM
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Default Re: Countertops

"not rounded aggregate."

I'm not suggesting that. What I am outlining is that, for countertops, where the aggregate is to be exposed. you want an aggregate produced from crushed natural stone, as opposed to aggregate made from crushed blast rock. You can tell the difference visually in two ways; crushed natural stone will have a certain number of rounded surfaces and there will be variation in the colour of the stone.

You get exactly this in the bagged, brand name pre-mix.

Crushed blast rock is homogeneous and thus uninteresting. More importantly, often the blasting process leaves stresses and minute fractures thought the particles. The individual aggregate pieces are therefore weaker. This will result in "picking out" and minute holes in the finished surface resulting from the grinding and polishing process.

Last edited by Neil2; 11-21-2010 at 01:39 PM.
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