#11  
Old 03-06-2014, 10:31 AM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Washington State USA
Posts: 778
Default Re: Basalt the material made in hell.

v12spirit,
Here's a link to my first post at Forno Bravo. In that post I included a photo of an WFO built of basalt. A quick look shows large gaps between the pieces of basalt that were filled with (I suspect) common type 2 portland cement/concrete/mortar. The issue I would see with using solid pieces would be shaping the pieces to fit closely together. IMHO it is easier and more efficient to use a crushed material which one can use in a concrete which can easily be shaped and formed.

Using a smaller aggregate wherein the sand is of the same material as the larger pieces makes for a more uniform material which might lessen possible issues of unequal expansion/contraction when heating and cooling.

http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f3/h...html#post28063 (Hello from Western Washington)

Hope this helps,
Wiley
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  #12  
Old 03-06-2014, 10:52 AM
stonecutter's Avatar
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Location: South Carolina,USA
Posts: 1,909
Default Re: Basalt the material made in hell.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiley View Post
v12spirit,
Here's a link to my first post at Forno Bravo. In that post I included a photo of an WFO built of basalt. A quick look shows large gaps between the pieces of basalt that were filled with (I suspect) common type 2 portland cement/concrete/mortar. The issue I would see with using solid pieces would be shaping the pieces to fit closely together. IMHO it is easier and more efficient to use a crushed material which one can use in a concrete which can easily be shaped and formed.

Using a smaller aggregate wherein the sand is of the same material as the larger pieces makes for a more uniform material which might lessen possible issues of unequal expansion/contraction when heating and cooling.

http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f3/h...html#post28063 (Hello from Western Washington)

Hope this helps,
Wiley
So, I see that the surround is made of stone, but is the oven itself made of Basalt? I would very much like to see any other pictures you have of this oven.

I have been in the planning stages of building an all stone oven, the obvious choice would be soapstone. After reading many research papers about thermal conductivity of stone, I am seeing that Basalt may be a viable option. As expected, using a different material comes with its own parameters, but that is the fun part...figuring out how to make it functional without it being too tedious.

I know one thing about building with Basalt from experience....it is a chisel breaking, saw blade wearing, hard lifting stone to work with.
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  #13  
Old 03-06-2014, 01:56 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Washington State USA
Posts: 778
Default Re: Basalt the material made in hell.

Hi Stonecutter,
The photos were taken using a small pocket Kodak 110 camera and when I took them I had no idea that I would some 30 years hence be building my own WFO. As such I did not take the same photos regarding detail etc. that I would today. That being said I have looked closely at the originals and IMHO the interior of the oven was bricks as was the hearth.

The story I was told (and remember so please bear with me as this was a while ago) was that the WFO was rebuilt by the artist Paul Gauguin in return for booze money. He was depicted to me as a man of very meager means who often traded his carvings (I remember seeing a carved gunstock that I was told was traded to pay for a drinking debt, worth fortunes today but then...not so much) and worked as a day laborer for drinking money. The WFO was originally built sometime previous and had fallen in. It was built by tightly packing bricks over a sand dome and covering the bricks by basalt chips and rock so as to fill the voids between the bricks and this in turn covered by larger pieces. Whether portland type cement was used in the construction of the actual dome I do not know. When one was finished with the overfill one hand dug out the sand. I remember smoke drifting up thru the top of the structure when it was fired besides flowing out the front. No chimney. The arch was quite low/shallow. I do not know anything about whether insulation was used in the dome but suspect not.

Although the Marquesas Islands are volcanic island I do not remember seeing any pumice in my wanderings there. I spent almost 6 months in the Marquesas's in 1977, Another few weeks in 1978 and an additional almost three months in 1983. The reason I was shy a full six months and three months was I had to sail to Tahiti to renew my visas before the six and three months were up. It was a good time to be young, single and a bit adventurous.

Hope this helps,
Wiley
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  #14  
Old 03-06-2014, 05:16 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
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Default Re: Basalt the material made in hell.

In that time period and area, it was almost certainly not portland cement, but natural cement, that is lime.
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  #15  
Old 03-06-2014, 08:17 PM
v12spirit's Avatar
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Syria
Posts: 308
Default Re: Basalt the material made in hell.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stonecutter View Post
So, I see that the surround is made of stone, but is the oven itself made of Basalt? I would very much like to see any other pictures you have of this oven.

I have been in the planning stages of building an all stone oven, the obvious choice would be soapstone. After reading many research papers about thermal conductivity of stone, I am seeing that Basalt may be a viable option. As expected, using a different material comes with its own parameters, but that is the fun part...figuring out how to make it functional without it being too tedious.

I know one thing about building with Basalt from experience....it is a chisel breaking, saw blade wearing, hard lifting stone to work with.
I am planning to build an outdoor oven and still wondering why Basalt is not used in constructing the oven itself!!
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  #16  
Old 03-06-2014, 10:56 PM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Washington State USA
Posts: 778
Default Re: Basalt the material made in hell.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
In that time period and area, it was almost certainly not portland cement, but natural cement, that is lime.
I remember the smoke seeping thru the top of the WFO. It is also entirely possible the oven was mortarless with the few bits of cement /mortar on the front of the oven of more recent date.

V12Spirit, I think Stonecutter's statements "I know one thing about building with Basalt from experience....it is a chisel breaking, saw blade wearing, hard lifting stone to work with." are sufficient reasons why one would not work with solid basalt blocks. There are alternatives that are easier to work and perform as well.

Bests,
Wiley
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  #17  
Old 03-07-2014, 02:36 AM
v12spirit's Avatar
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Syria
Posts: 308
Default Re: Basalt the material made in hell.

Hi Wiley,
That sounds reasonable but Brickie IN OZ did the offending job of cutting the Basalt for the oven base and decoration, but surprisingly built the hot chamber from fire bricks.
see: http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/44/o...o-15241-8.html (Oven number two..)
I just want to know anything about the thermal properties of Basalt. There is plenty of it in the territory.
BTW I have a post regarding BTU please view it and reply. It is a thermodynamics problem, and, you know, you are the candidate to give your opinion.
Cheers.
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