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  #171  
Old 03-30-2010, 10:52 PM
Serf
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: portland
Posts: 16
Default Re: Steel Dome Oven

Wiley

Makes sense,1/4 basically has the caricature of sand,and now that i think about it i think the basalt supplier said 1/4 inch minus that will save me a step thanks,I followed up on the lime, I guess you only want to use lime with normal cement the lime help's keeping the cement from burning out.so if I use fondu I won't need it....thanks again.

Kevin
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  #172  
Old 03-31-2010, 10:14 AM
Serf
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: portland
Posts: 16
Default Re: Steel Dome Oven

Wiley,

I went back and looked at you pic's,and wanted to know if you formed up your cladding triangles? or did you form the triangles against the steel dome as you went. how long does it take to set up? I'm going to start on Friday and hope to be done on Sunday,Thursday (tomorrow) I'm going to build a fire and hope it vent's well. I used a 6 inch chimney from home depot.we will see thanks again...kevin
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  #173  
Old 03-31-2010, 11:07 AM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Washington State USA
Posts: 778
Default Re: Steel Dome Oven

Kevin, I formed up as I went. I would bring to your attention the initial form which I made around the base of my WFO. This allowed me to get past the "vertical" (where the concrete is standing and supported upon itself ) and to be forming against the dome (cylinder). The further up the dome/cylinder the more the concrete is supported as opposed to the concrete standing on itself. Casting the ring around the base also allowed me to get a feel for how easily the material works and how soon it kicks off.

When forming the triangles I created them by eye and placed aluminium foil between the joins. I pressed the foil into the just formed triangles before it fully set off. This mandated the expansion joint occur where I wanted it to occur rather than form (crack) at some perhaps less desireable location. The size of the triangles was determined by the size batches I made...again learned by casting the initial supporting base mentioned above.

The stuff goes off quickly and one is advised to have a plan and have tools laid out etc. Not to panic you, but figure 20 minutes from mixing to unworkable, so not a problem with a reasonable size batch but no time to go looking for that trowel or aluminium foil. By the end I found I enjoyed working with the material, it easily and quickly assumed an initial set and allowed one to hold shapes with a trowel in one hand and shape with a trowel in the other; after a few moments the held material would stay in place (allowing it to be smoothed and faired into the rest) where with regular cement/concrete it would have slumped when released.

I also found that I had good results by mixing a batch and then cleaning up the wheel barrow (where I mixed it) with a hose and brush. Then starting a new batch. By the time it was mixed and ready to go the previous batch was quite hard and I could form against it without damage. You should have no difficulty alternately working one side and then the other of your cylinder.

Hope this helps, looking forward to some photos...
Bests,
Wiley
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  #174  
Old 03-31-2010, 12:54 PM
Serf
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: portland
Posts: 16
Default Re: Steel Dome Oven

Wiley.

You used 5 to 1 ratio for your cladding?

thanks...kevin
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  #175  
Old 03-31-2010, 11:17 PM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Washington State USA
Posts: 778
Default Re: Steel Dome Oven

Yes, by volume 1 part calcium aluminate cement to five parts 1/4 minus crushed basalt. Check post number 48 in this thread.
Bests,
Wiley
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  #176  
Old 04-03-2010, 09:12 AM
Serf
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: California
Posts: 1
Default Re: Steel Dome Oven

Wiley,

I have been reading your thread from the beginning - what an excellent project and well documented from the beginning.

Lots of great ideas.

Thanks
Provin
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  #177  
Old 09-02-2010, 05:27 AM
Serf
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: portland
Posts: 16
Default Re: Steel Dome Oven

Wiley

It's been a while, my project is done and you can see some pic's if you google kindle kart, It should bring up my facebook account and you can go through my photo's of my wood fire pizza cart in Portland.I think the oven is very well built I love the steel dome for transmitting heat on my oven floor,but I would do a couple things different,the main issue is my dome is 28 inches away from the floor although my floor gets hot enough I think it should be more like 20 inches.
The oven is big 5ftx5ft inside measurement,also I think my oven opening is to big letting too much heat to escape out the door and up the chimney. Do you think 20 inches sounds correct for floor to top of dome ratio?I plan on taking all my fire bricks out pouring a 6-8 inches more of insulation concrete then putting firebricks back.I really don't care how firebricks cook my pizza so I might add a slab of soapstone on top of my firebricks,Any thoughts on this?Do you know a good place to buy soapstone in the northwest?


Thanks for all your help....kevin
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  #178  
Old 09-02-2010, 10:58 AM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Washington State USA
Posts: 778
Default Re: Steel Dome Oven

Hi Kevin,
First, you're more than welcome for any help I was in the design of your WFO. This forum is great for alternative ideas and mutual sharing of thoughts on our unusual creations.

I'm not on Facebook so I couldn't view the photos of your finished WFO. Regarding the height of internal dome and height of door: It is my understanding that that ratio (63%) is an emperical one derived from study of lots of successful WFOs. It has do do with airflow and proponets state WFOs with that ratio allow for incoming air to most efficiently supply air to the fire and exhaust the products of combustion (gasses smoke etc). I usually try not to reinvent the wheel and so go with what works adding my own twist on what I'm doing. One does need to keep in mind that with such departures from the norm there is a risk of less than hoped for results.

As I haven't seen your photos I do not know how difficult it would be to fabricate a temporary structure to lower the door height to see how that effects the performance of your WFO. As for too great an interior height that could be reduced by raising the floor (which would also lessen the door height and change the ratio). Of course that would change the working surface height as well as the heat up times (due to greater mass) as well as the weight of the finished WFO. Lots of factors to consider. But it wouldn't be much work to lay a temporary layer of bricks on top of the existing floor and so test the idea of lessened door and ceiling height. Five foot by five foot is a large WFO, you must have a source of inexpensive firewood.

My next WFO will be a steel dome as well (yes, I plan on building another, perhaps next year at a campsite/trailer site I'm constructing next to a pond I'm digging right now at the other end of my little five acres). I hope to find a condemmed propane cylinder which has elliptical ends. This will make for a WFO with a lower ceiling. Not that I'm dissatisfied with my hemispherical WFO just the new WFO will be strickly for pizza and other low dishes. However, at the speed of my construction and demands upon my time it may be built the summer after that, but it is in the plans. I've attached two photos of bucking up some of the logs from the trees I've pulled over at the pond site (one gets the root ball out at the same time as one drops the tree if one pulls a tree over), and one of the same logs split.

I don't know of any source for soapstone here in the PNW.

Bests,
Wiley
Attached Thumbnails
Steel Dome Oven-bucking-up-logs.jpg   Steel Dome Oven-same-logs-split.jpg  
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  #179  
Old 09-03-2010, 03:50 PM
Nic The Landscaper's Avatar
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Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Posts: 100
Default Re: Steel Dome Oven

In Portland go to Precision Counter Tops for Soapstone. You will get your best pricing on remnants and left over cut outs. Even at remnant prices a 60" oven would be expensive though. Go talk to My Fiance Molly at Precision she'll be happy to help you.
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  #180  
Old 04-16-2011, 05:00 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 153
Default Re: Steel Dome Oven

Wiley, I too plan on a campsite oven (moveable if necessary) and another at my home....
AND I'm a midwest sailor!...I've really loved and been tremendously informed by this site and especially by your thread...can't thank you enough...
anything to add in retrospect?
Thanks again, Bill
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