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  #11  
Old 05-29-2014, 11:20 AM
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Default Re: Pedicab Tricycle Oven

That sounds like a lot of work for frozen pizza.
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  #12  
Old 05-29-2014, 02:37 PM
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Default Re: Pedicab Tricycle Oven

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Originally Posted by pizzaholic View Post
Im married to the head of the health department.
In Australia the handling of money before the handling of food is illegal, without hand washing in between. This would preclude taking money and prepping a pizza. Maybe things are different where you live, you should ask your wife, but it may mean you need two operators. Surely you'd need some kind of hand washing facility anyway.
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  #13  
Old 06-04-2014, 10:05 AM
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Default Re: Pedicab Tricycle Oven

Thanks for the concerns I got the pizza part of the equation nicely dialed at this point. I'm hoping for some ideas on....

How much if any mass should I use.

Firebricks vs soapstone floor. Soapstones high conductivity means less wood and potentially easier baking of pies but it may crack easier than firebrick..maybe use the thinner firebrick?

I plan on welding 4 posts to hold poles that are packed under the oven to make a small roof over oven and baker(s). I was thinking of making the structure with sail canvas or something similar. Any thoughts?

Any ideas on how to make it as lightweight as possible would be appreciated also!
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  #14  
Old 06-04-2014, 11:55 AM
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Default Re: Pedicab Tricycle Oven

I was concerned about weight when I designed my little 21" mobile oven as I wanted it to be able to roll on and off my trailer. I pinched weight fr om here and ther and managed to get the weight down from 250kg to 170kg excluding the trolley the oven sits on. By replacing heavy aggregates with lighter ones I was able to reduce the weight substantially. Unfortunately doing this also reduces strength and a mobile oven requires more strength than a stationary one because masonry does not like bumps and vibration. The weakest point in my build and the one that is creating the most trouble is the supporting slab which I used Hebel(AAC) for. It is 70 mm thick and contains 5mm steel rods cast into the centre of each panel. The idea was that this slab would serve as both structural and insulating thereby saving a heap of weight.The oven still fires ok and at around 5 years old has seen some pretty heavy work as I hire it out. But it is getting to the stage where it is not a good r epresentation of my product so it is due for a rebuild when I have the time.
I really think you would be better of staying away from refractory and making or buying a stainless steel oven, well insulated, with a thin firebrick floor. There are commercial ovens like this available and while they are no good for retained heat cooking they are ok for cooking high temp pizzas. I don't know the name of any of the commercial brands but try pizzamaking .com, there is some discussion about them there.

Last edited by david s; 06-04-2014 at 12:02 PM.
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  #15  
Old 06-04-2014, 02:03 PM
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Default Re: Pedicab Tricycle Oven

I'm going to weld a frame for the interior dome to attach to and I will use firebrick or soapstone on top of perlicrete or maybe some of this ceramic fiber board.

There will be a heavy gauge mesh or maybe some type of sheet metal on the bottom and sides of the hearth insulation to keep it all in. I've used hardibacker on other ovens but I don't think it'll be light enough or strong enough for this application.

Do you think I should use an inch or two crushed basalt for the mass or just wrap it in insulation and cover that with some light metal?
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  #16  
Old 06-04-2014, 02:45 PM
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Default Re: Pedicab Tricycle Oven

Quote:
Originally Posted by pizzaholic View Post
Thanks for the concerns I got the pizza part of the equation nicely dialed at this point. I'm hoping for some ideas on....

How much if any mass should I use.

Firebricks vs soapstone floor. Soapstones high conductivity means less wood and potentially easier baking of pies but it may crack easier than firebrick..maybe use the thinner firebrick?

I plan on welding 4 posts to hold poles that are packed under the oven to make a small roof over oven and baker(s). I was thinking of making the structure with sail canvas or something similar. Any thoughts?

Any ideas on how to make it as lightweight as possible would be appreciated also!

What about a pizza stone on firebrick? Cut the bricks in half to save on weight and use the stone for the actual cooking surface.

Trigger instead of canvas since you aren't leaving this in the elements. Or nylon - both will save on weight and cost. Nylon if weight is a big deal.
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  #17  
Old 06-04-2014, 03:33 PM
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Default Re: Pedicab Tricycle Oven

Is Trigger waterproof? I need to be dry and I am also appealing to a certain aesthetic..canvas seems durable and looks good but you might be right that they weight isnt worth it.

Im not really sure about the weight. The bike manufacturer keeps assuring me that weight wont be too much of an issue but I am still trying to keep it as light as possible.

They sell firebricks that are an inch and a quarter...in terms of a pizza stone im pretty sure those are made out of soapstone. Soapstone seems like it will do the most consistent fast cooking for its weight. I just hope that it wont crack. It would mean that I dont need any firebricks just insulation underneath..ceramic fiberboard is looking pretty appealing..
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  #18  
Old 06-06-2014, 06:28 AM
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Default Re: Pedicab Tricycle Oven

Quote:
Originally Posted by pizzaholic View Post
Is Trigger waterproof? I need to be dry and I am also appealing to a certain aesthetic..canvas seems durable and looks good but you might be right that they weight isnt worth it.

Im not really sure about the weight. The bike manufacturer keeps assuring me that weight wont be too much of an issue but I am still trying to keep it as light as possible.

They sell firebricks that are an inch and a quarter...in terms of a pizza stone im pretty sure those are made out of soapstone. Soapstone seems like it will do the most consistent fast cooking for its weight. I just hope that it wont crack. It would mean that I dont need any firebricks just insulation underneath..ceramic fiberboard is looking pretty appealing..
1) No, but you can weather proof it easily enough for the light duty it will receive. Trigger looks like a light canvas so you get the appearance without the weight. I've made a canopy with trigger and it held up very well - until people stopped bothering to dry it before packing but that's another story...

2) The bike can handle more than you can - even if the frame can take it you gotta move this thing periodically - that's a great reason to keep it as light as possible in my book!

3) Since the surface will take a lot of abuse from peels, burnt pizza and every other disaster that you can imagine, it makes sense to use the smoothest, most durable surface you can get. Firebrick offers more resistance (danged corners) no matter how well you level it.
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  #19  
Old 06-06-2014, 09:01 AM
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Default Re: Pedicab Tricycle Oven

Your main dilemma is mass. To make the oven strong enough the refractory can't be particularly thin, but to make it transportable it needs to be strong. A V8 is a simpler if less elegant solution.
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  #20  
Old 06-06-2014, 04:24 PM
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Default Re: Pedicab Tricycle Oven

My laterally fired coal oven, is 32 deep x 37 wide x 20 high, and weights about 300 pounds using 1-1/4" thick castings with a high percentage of stainless needles and a standard thickness firebrick floor. It is fully insulated and has a 22.5 x 22.5 baking area, which is probably equivalent to a 32-36" round floor in a traditional wood oven where the fire takes up some of the floor space. It fires in about an hour with wood, and about 2 with coal(takes a while to get the coal going and hot) and can cook evenly from 500F-1000F+ depending on the fuel type and oven management.

What you are after can be achieved, but you are going to have to move into uncharted territory to get there.
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