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  #201  
Old 02-11-2013, 04:55 PM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: South Australia
Posts: 620
Default Re: Oven on wheels

The other night the missus "suggested" a BBQ for dinner would be welcome.
So I fired the oven, and made a rack for the sausages and chops form a couple of old refrigerator shelves.
I did the chops and snags on the rack.
Something I didn't realise, when you cook your meat on an elevated rack in a fully heated oven, the top and bottom cook at the same time, and you don't have to turn the meat over.
Did a tray of capsicum, zucchini, onion and carrots tossed in garlic, oil, salt and pepper, and a tray of roast spuds.
It all cooked really quickly.
Pretty happy with the outcome. We'd just started serving it up when I remembered to photograph it.
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  #202  
Old 02-17-2013, 06:11 PM
Serf
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 9
Default Re: Oven on wheels

Thanks for the detailed thread.

Some great ideas and trouble shooting in here.
__________________
Cheers Josh


Newbie working on plans for a semi-permanent, cheap (partially/mostly recycled) WFO...
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  #203  
Old 02-17-2013, 09:29 PM
WJW WJW is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Camarillo, CA
Posts: 387
Default Re: Oven on wheels

Be careful cooking on refrigerator racks. I have no idea if it's true, but I was always taught in Boy Scouts that such racks are typcally galvanized...and cooking on galvanized surfaces was a big no-no.

Bill
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  #204  
Old 02-17-2013, 11:57 PM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: South Australia
Posts: 620
Default Re: Oven on wheels

No worries, these are chrome plated steel. Had a moment's concern about hexavalent chrome and decided life is too short to stress about it.
I reckon if we are not worried about chromium in the bricks, no need to worry about chromium on the rack.
According to my research, you need welding temperatures to generate hexavalent chrome from chromium metal.

Having said that, I just went and looked at the rack I heated in the oven - the plating is flaking off, differences in thermal expansion rates?
Thinking about it these were kinda rusty looking. It was an old fridge, so maybe it was nickel plate.
I figure I'll hit it with the wire wheel, or just re-heat it in the oven until I burn it all off.
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  #205  
Old 04-03-2015, 12:50 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Africa
Posts: 16
Default Re: Oven on wheels

Hi Guys, Do you think its fine to use Corobrik Pavers for a WFO. It's fired at 1500C and according to them would do just fine for a WFO. They suggested the Constantia paver @ R4.80ea... a far cry from R35ea for normal FireBrick!!

Corobrik |Bricks & Paving - Clay Brick & Paver Supplier - Corobrik
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  #206  
Old 04-03-2015, 04:07 AM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: South Australia
Posts: 620
Default Re: Oven on wheels

Sorry, mate, it's an impossible question to answer without seeing them in the flesh.
Bear in mind a paver isn't intended for thermal cycling, but, having said that, people have been successfully building WFO with ordinary bricks for hundreds of years, and a paver is an extra strong, skinny brick.

I can give you some tests and things to consider, and they've already answered a couple:
1) The fact the clay can be fired to 1500C means the clay must be at least a bit refractory.
2) Get a sample. I don't like any paver that has that black iron stone staining and bits of clinker, and there looks to be a little bit of that in one of the constantia pavers in the picture. I prefer pavers that are one uniform colour. I handpicked from a pile if leftovers.
3) Cut one open - look for it to be a uniform colour all the way through. Sometimes pavers look burnt and black on the inside - not heated quite hot enough, or maybe long enough, and these are sintered in the middle, rather than fused. Those sorts of pavers tend to be fragile after they have been heated to WFO temps.
4) If the paver is uniform colour all the way through, heat the paver on a butane stove until it gets to 450-500C, on all surfaces. A cheap 20 dollar Ebay infrared thermometer will do. Then let it cool.
4) If the piece of paver you fully saturated to WFO temp hasn't cracked after it has cooled, give it the drop test. Hold it at shoulder height and drop it onto sharp rocks, or concrete curb or such-like.
If it doesn't break, it has survived being heated to WFO without developing concealed cracks. Should be able to use it. Should also drop the unheated piece - if that one breaks, don't use that type of paver.

After a couple years of use, my oven has no cracked bricks/pavers. Any cracks in mine are where the mortar has let go of the brick.
I have a theory about why, and I would do things a tiny bit different if I build oven number 4.
Pick real smooth pressed ones for the cooking floor.
Hope this advice helps.

Last edited by wotavidone; 04-03-2015 at 04:10 AM.
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  #207  
Old 04-03-2015, 04:45 AM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: South Australia
Posts: 620
Default Re: Oven on wheels

PS, regardless of whether they think their bricks are good enough, I gotta say that the oven they build in their how-to video looks spectacularly awful to me.
I watched it with the sound off because the missus was watching Tvand I get in trouble for making noise, but do my eyes deceive me, or did the guy mix cement and perlite for the cooking floor and inner wall?

Last edited by wotavidone; 04-03-2015 at 04:57 AM.
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  #208  
Old 04-03-2015, 11:56 AM
Serf
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Africa
Posts: 16
Default Re: Oven on wheels

Man, that oven is horrendous!! Thank you for the advice, I quite like the burgundy paver and champagne paver but will get some on tuesday and do your tests.
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  #209  
Old 04-03-2015, 03:29 PM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: South Australia
Posts: 620
Default Re: Oven on wheels

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondW View Post
Man, that oven is horrendous!! Thank you for the advice, I quite like the burgundy paver and champagne paver but will get some on tuesday and do your tests.
They do look better, wish I could see them in the flesh. Also, I see that some of the pavers are also available as 60mm thick.
That'd be a good thing - gives you some options for floor thickness.
If both the burgundy and champagne pavers are good, you can do some nice things with the colours.
An acquaintance went to a local brick company, told them what he was about and they recommended their darker coloured pavers, as they had been fired higher. I have read that the colour is not just what's in the clay, but is varied somewhat by varying the temperature - might want to check with the suppliers on that.
Also the 60mm ones are only 200 by 98 - this gives you the option of ending up with a dome 3.9 inches thick.
the 230 x 115 pavers we get over here give us the option of 4.5 inches thick, or stand them on edge and end up with the dome being the thickness of the paver.

So, depending which way you orient your pavers and which ones you buy, you have quite a few options for dome and floor thicknesses. Brilliant. R4.80 is about 53c Australian - very cheap bricks, compared to Aussie ones. If you are getting a salary comparable to an Aussie one, that is. (its all relative.)

Last edited by wotavidone; 04-03-2015 at 03:46 PM.
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  #210  
Old 04-04-2015, 12:21 AM
Serf
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Africa
Posts: 16
Default Re: Oven on wheels

I think I will go with half bricks all the way through (for the dome) which would give me 3.9in. I'm pretty sure that would help with excellent heat retention. I must say I quite like the champagne colored brick but the burgundy does "look" harder.

There's two other points that worries me a bit:
1. Dome to arch connection (transition)
2. Building the arch (FB way or interlinking with the courses)

Do you think its better to do a vermiculite "inlay" in the slab before you pack the floor or (depending on the quality and thickness of the brick) just the floor straight on the concrete?
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