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  #41  
Old 04-19-2014, 06:02 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

Thanks dave
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  #42  
Old 05-23-2014, 01:37 AM
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Exclamation Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

Hi mates,

My project has been delayed due to lack of materials, and I have been trying to get calsil bricks for the hearth for more than a month now.

I ordered the bricks after being assured by the masonry supplier that they were insulation bricks. They arrived today, but to my surprise, I found them not like the WHITE calsil bricks I used to see on the site. Rather, they looked like fire bricks!!!

Please tell me if these were insulating bricks or what ????

They are (11*23*6.5) cm, and they are about 2.5$ each.

Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one-20140523152.jpg
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Last edited by v12spirit; 05-23-2014 at 01:56 AM.
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  #43  
Old 05-23-2014, 01:56 AM
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Unhappy Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

G'day
It all comes down to weight so the pics don't help that much .
If its as heavy or heavier than a house brick ... More likely a firebrick.
If is really light in comparison to a house brick .. It should be an insulation brick.
Regards dave
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  #44  
Old 05-23-2014, 01:59 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

Insulating fire bricks are a different material to calcium silicate insulating board. If the bricks are really light then they should be IFB's, if they're heavy, about the same as a solid red clay brick then they are probably dense firebrick.Looking at the pic, they look like dense firebricks to me.
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  #45  
Old 05-23-2014, 02:04 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

david, dave,
with the dimensions provided, how much must each brick weight? I'm gonna weight them to know what kind of bricks these are.
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  #46  
Old 05-23-2014, 02:28 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

My dense firebricks are exactly 2kg/ litre, some are even denser than this. My IFB's are 0.5 kg/litre. Going on your dimensions if they are IFB's which I suspect they are not they should weigh around 0.8 kg.
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  #47  
Old 05-23-2014, 02:29 AM
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Cool Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

Quote:
Originally Posted by v12spirit View Post
david. There is another "cartable" in your post that needs to be corrected to castable I read your post and started looking for "cartable" in the dictionary then I knew it was a spilling mistake and that you meant castable. Then I was surprised that you fixed one of them ..
This may be a mad idea, but I'm trying to make my oven fast to heat up. I don't need the retained heat cooking. What is the benifit (to me) of waiting 90 minutes as in your castable oven, or even 45 minutes as in Wiley's oven which has steel in it cladded with basalt in order for the dome to clear while I can wait just a few minutes or up to 15 in an oven with less thermal mass? My belief is that the thermal mass favors two things: heat consistency and retained heat cooking, and that the thermal mass contributes nothing to getting a 2 min pizza out of the oven. The 2 min pizza is achieved by the current temperature inside the oven which is achieved by adding more fuel.
If I am cladding my oven I don't want to go beyond 0.5" thick. If I have to go thicker I prefer to not clad it at all; just 2 mm of steel with aluminum foil over it then the ceramic blanket. So what do you see?
G'day V12
Metal shell,insulated on the outside, internal heat source.
What you have now described is basically your domestic oven, only thing missing is the open shelving really.
In my pre bravo forum days I used to cook pizza for my family in a domestic oven. Having worked in a pizza place previously I understood you needed a bit of thermal mass under the pizza otherwise it just would cook fast enough. My solution was using a thick aluminum backing dish turned upside down at the top of a well heated oven. The results were... Well except able enough for a couple of hungry children and they never complained, but they were less than perfect.
I've experimented with pizza on pizza stones on BBqs and under the grills of my gas domestic stove since then. The results were except able but not on par with WFO with a bit of mass.
I myself recon you should include a couple of ins of mass at least to you plan to make it work.
You have to remember the fire is there to replenish the heat stored in the mass of the oven. If you have no mass adding a pizza drops the heat straight away. You want that bank of heat that cooks things straight away .
You might want to experiment with a pizza stone in your domestic oven to find out whilst your supplies arrive . There is section in the forum worth reading.
Can't be bad especially if the experiments are worth eating
Regards dave
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  #48  
Old 05-23-2014, 02:46 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

They are 3.2 kg each. They are exactly fire bricks .
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  #49  
Old 05-23-2014, 02:53 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

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There is a question I have about ceramic insulation blankets. Is it toxic? I mean after carrying it into home my hands started to rub a little and I had a kind of a cough! It lasted for just a few minutes then every thing was OK.
It depends on what product you have. Some insulating blankets are a class 2 carcinogen. That is, tumours have been found in rats but to date none in humans. Some blanket like Morgan Superwool is exonerated from this classification as the fibres used are partly soluble. Check the MSDS on the product you have.
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Old 05-28-2014, 04:50 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

Mates,

I could (eventually) find IFBs, but they are rather expensive. They are 5.6 $ each. That is rather expensive for me because I'm planning to build another oven in the Garden, and insulating the hearth for both will cost as much as 4 ceramic blankets each of which is sufficient for insulating the dome of one oven.
I've got a crazy idea that I would like to justify by the forum.

Since I'mm building with 100% steel, the hearth will have a self support ability. I'm thinking of wrapping the whole steel oven (including the hearth) with the ceramic blanket, and let the oven support itself by means of 3 (or more) legs fixed to the oven base by screws and nuts, but I have two worries:

1- the legs may impede the insulation, being heat conductive.
2- the the build is made of 2 mm thick steel sheet. (I can't go thicker for the dome, but I can go thicker for the hearth). I'm afraid that the the hearth will start to deform due to heavy utensils (roasts, vegs, ..) being fed into the oven over the years and due to the hearth being self supported with no supporting insulation underneath. So, do I thicken the layers of insulation blanket under the hearth until the blanket is almost compressd tightly to get a kind of support? or do I use a thicker steel sheet for the hearth to strengthen its "self-support" ability? The second choice makes me worried that the thermal mass of the dome gets less than the thermal mass of the hearth which may result in improper heat consistency i.e. a cooler hearth.

So guys, what do you think?
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