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  #91  
Old 07-23-2014, 02:04 PM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

If it were mine I'd definitely be going for option 2
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  #92  
Old 07-27-2014, 12:32 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

The oven was planned to finish tomorrow which is the Lesser Bairam. I wanted to make some traditional Bairam bakery in the oven and share them with the forum. Unfortunately the finishing was delayed for reasons I don't have control over.
Iíve been trying to stick to the plans of construction. They suggest 100 cm as a height for the cooking floor (which feels the most comfortable). I modified my slab and raised it to the desired height using these floor tiles that I found in the garden. Laying the tiles was not that accurate being almost my first masonry job. When tried laying some insulation bricks over the tiles they were a little bit shaky. Is laying a thin layer of sand or clay over the tiles useful to make the insulation bricks steady?

Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one-1-slab.jpg

Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one-2-raised-slab.jpg
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  #93  
Old 07-27-2014, 02:29 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

G'day
50 /50 powdered clay and sand, add water to make a stiffish paste. Apply with a notched tile trowel. When you put the bricks in position the sides of the brick must first touch, then you drop them down. If you drop them down first then try and push then together your paste will build up and seperate the brick. Tap then down with a rubber mallet if not a block of wood and an ordinary hammer is just as good.
If the surfaces are drawing the moisture out of the paste a smear of margerine or cooking oil will provide a temperary barrier. Might not be needed inside out of the sun. See what happens
Regards Dave
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  #94  
Old 07-27-2014, 08:47 PM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

Quote:
Originally Posted by cobblerdave View Post
G'day
50 /50 powdered clay and sand, add water to make a stiffish paste. Apply with a notched tile trowel. When you put the bricks in position the sides of the brick must first touch, then you drop them down. If you drop them down first then try and push then together your paste will build up and seperate the brick. Tap then down with a rubber mallet if not a block of wood and an ordinary hammer is just as good.
If the surfaces are drawing the moisture out of the paste a smear of margerine or cooking oil will provide a temperary barrier. Might not be needed inside out of the sun. See what happens
Regards Dave
Thanks for the helpful details Dave, I don't actually have a notched tile trowel. This may sound odd, but can I use my straight wood saw instead, or what do you suggest as an alternative (being a rabid DIYer)?
Why should I trap moisture into the paste and for how long?
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  #95  
Old 07-27-2014, 09:17 PM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

I don't know what your hardware store situation is like, but here our places sell notched plastic glue spreaders for those one off jobs where you don't want to buy a trowel that you'll never use again. Only $1 - $2. Easier than improvising but otherwise you just need to think of a way to spread the mix out evenly. I think saw teeth would be too small although a bow saw blade might work.
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  #96  
Old 07-28-2014, 12:40 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

G'day
A usefull size for this job is 10 mm notched "square teeth"in the trowel. You could perhaps make one with triangular notches as it would be easier to cut. Like Browney says they sell one off use plastic ones. So make one from flat plastic side of a food container. If it was in Aust a used ice cream container comes to mind as they are square with flat sides and the plastic thick enough.
Regards dave
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  #97  
Old 07-28-2014, 09:52 PM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

Thanks guys for the helpful inputs. I'll be adapting one with 10 mm teeth or use my bow saw blade if that didn't work.
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  #98  
Old 08-22-2014, 04:57 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

Is there a fundamental way to cut, wrap, AND snug the ceramic blanket over the dome? I used to see blankets secured with chicken wire or with rebar arches, but never have seen a post showing the steps for doing that. I don't want to be improvising on my own to do that.
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  #99  
Old 08-22-2014, 05:14 AM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

The blanket cuts very easily with a sharp snap off blade knife. you could secure it with chicken wire. I don't bother, but prefer to cover it with vermicrete to even out the bumps.This then leaves you with a firm enough substrate to render on to. I don't think using rebar is a good idea because it is adding heavy corrosive and conductive material over the area you are trying to keep cool. The heavy steel attracts the heat to itself. If you must use steel then make it as thin as you can. I prefer to use random fibres (non corrosive) in the mix, they are more expensive, but way faster than fiddling around with chicken wire.
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  #100  
Old 09-23-2014, 01:40 PM
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Default Re: Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one

One of the things that still puzzling me is how to make the ends meet between the steel and the decorating bricks.. The steel arch looks like this in the picture
Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one-20140714251.jpg
I welded this rim all around the oven opening in hope of providing a sort of sealing base where the arch bricks can lay on (for the top bricks) or engage with (for the side bricks).
Brick oven reconstructed to a steel one-20080101323.jpg
My first thought is to slit the side bricks so their slots engage into the metal rim on the two sides, and let the top bricks lay on the upper part of the rim in order to achieve some sealing and/or integrated structure. But I don't know how to prepare for the inevitable different expansions of steel and brick!!
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