#31  
Old 10-26-2009, 12:54 PM
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Default Re: Concrete slab question

Every other is fine - and obvioulsy the ones with steel.

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  #32  
Old 10-26-2009, 03:53 PM
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Default Re: Concrete slab question

im sure you could fill every other as long as you throw some rebar in too... You can also use SBC, Surface Bonding Cement,, really easy to work with and has more strength than a mortar joint..

Where will the oven be in the picture ?

Cheers
Mark
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  #33  
Old 10-26-2009, 04:28 PM
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Default Re: Concrete slab question

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Originally Posted by ThisOldGarageNJ View Post
Where will the oven be in the picture ?
Actually, the oven will eventually be built somewhere close to where that big ole' tub is sitting. I plan on designing and building a terraced concrete patio around the oven.

The block wall I'm working on now is just the side of the house leading down to the main patio area where the WFO will be.
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  #34  
Old 10-26-2009, 06:06 PM
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Default Re: Concrete slab question

Is it going to be a suspended slab on top of those block walls or are you pouring inside of them. I am sorry if it is mentioned somewhere but, just getting a feel for what you are doing
All the best!
Dutch
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Old 10-26-2009, 06:20 PM
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Default Re: Concrete slab question

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Originally Posted by Dutchoven View Post
Is it going to be a suspended slab on top of those block walls or are you pouring inside of them. I am sorry if it is mentioned somewhere but, just getting a feel for what you are doing
All the best!
Dutch
Thanks.
Well, I was simply planning on filling them with dirt and gravel, then pouring the slab on top but that's quite a bit of filling material I have to come up with.
My other option is to erect block columns and suspend the slabs. A few concrete footings are still in place from the old wood deck that used to be there so I can use them for support if I decide to go that route.
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  #36  
Old 10-27-2009, 09:31 AM
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Default Re: Concrete slab question

Regarding suspended slabs, I have seen city street maintenance workers repair old collapsed sidewalks over large storm drain entries. Sheets of suspended plywood forms are placed under pinned criss-crossing rebars and concrete poured onto that. The plywood forms are left there indefinitely as there is no way to remove them.
I can probably do the same thing here and not have to deal with filling the areas with tons of solid fill material. ......almost like building a stand for an oven.

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.
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Old 10-27-2009, 03:34 PM
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Default Re: Concrete slab question

whats the farthest distance in your pour ? you may want to break it in half ? or put in a sonotube.... Im not sure how far you can span with just rebar, Is there any architects/engineers here ??
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  #38  
Old 10-27-2009, 04:13 PM
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Default Re: Concrete slab question

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Originally Posted by ThisOldGarageNJ View Post
whats the farthest distance in your pour ? you may want to break it in half ? or put in a sonotube.... Im not sure how far you can span with just rebar, Is there any architects/engineers here ??
The largest one area is 8'x12' and there are already 6 concrete pier footings inside of this area that used to hold up the old wood deck. I can easily stack columns of blocks on each footing there which can tie in with the slab pour. With enough 1/2" rebars I think it should be sufficient. I may even pin the edges of the slab to the existing foundation with rebars.
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  #39  
Old 10-27-2009, 04:16 PM
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Default Re: Concrete slab question

ok,, if you use your existing footings im sure you'll be fine (remember im not an engineer) but that sounds pretty solid, I dont think I would pin it to the existing foundation though,, I think you should leave it independant of your existing walls as your new walls may settle some and you wouldnt want them pulling them down... Just a thought

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Mark
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  #40  
Old 10-27-2009, 06:14 PM
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Default Re: Concrete slab question

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Originally Posted by fxpose View Post
Regarding suspended slabs, I have seen city street maintenance workers repair old collapsed sidewalks over large storm drain entries. Sheets of suspended plywood forms are placed under pinned criss-crossing rebars and concrete poured onto that. The plywood forms are left there indefinitely as there is no way to remove them.
I can probably do the same thing here and not have to deal with filling the areas with tons of solid fill material. ......almost like building a stand for an oven.

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.
I am no engineer also but, you might consider corrugated roofing instead. I used to work with a mason/concrete contractor in NY and we used a good bit of it for suspended concrete floors(when we did them). Although fill with a bit of cantilevered edge would most likely be better(think of a flat topped pyramid turned upside down with the edges over the block...takes a lot of fill to move before that slab moves). Oh and I agree with Mark...don't think it necessary to the new to the old...actually might be good to use foamboard insulation as an expansion joint.
Best
Dutch
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