#11  
Old 10-24-2009, 05:48 AM
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Location: Fort Worth
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Default Re: Using wood framing

It will go on existing concrete patio
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  #12  
Old 10-24-2009, 09:52 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Fort Worth
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Default Re: Using wood framing

Is the metal framing going to support the weight of the granite countertop? It does not seem like it will be strong enough, especially if it is sheathed only in cement board.
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  #13  
Old 10-24-2009, 10:34 AM
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Location: Kentucky
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Default Re: Using wood framing

I believe there are a couple of different gauges of metal studs. The studs at our local Home Depot (what I used) is the light-weight stuff.

If you go for the heavier gauge type (builder supply places) I'm sure it would work fine. I was amazed at how everything firmed up after adding the 1/4" cement board.

Definitely do your own research before starting.

I got a lot of good info from the BBQ Source Forums. These folks are to outdoor kitchens what Forno Bravo is to brick ovens:
BBQ Source Forums -> Custom Outdoor Kitchens
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  #14  
Old 10-24-2009, 11:45 AM
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Default Re: Using wood framing

If it is the equivalent of a 2x4 it should have no problem. Remember, in normal kitchens granite counter tops are supported by wood and the uprights aren't as big as 2x4's (1x4, I think).
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  #15  
Old 10-24-2009, 12:19 PM
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Location: Kaysville, Utah
Posts: 291
Default Re: Using wood framing

It won't be a problem. The vertical studs give a lot of compression strength. I put an outdoor kitchen on steel and it was no problem at all, although I used slate tile instead of granite. If you are concerned, use heavier gauge steel and put extra studs in. But really, it will be fine.

Joe
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  #16  
Old 10-24-2009, 12:25 PM
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Location: Pebble Beach, CA
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Default Re: Using wood framing

Most people build the oven on a concrete block stand, and then use metal studs for the enclosure and the outdoor kitchen cabinets.
James
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Old 10-24-2009, 04:07 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 1,436
Default Re: Using wood framing

here's a little info I hope we can all find usefull..
Quote:
Cutting steel studs is more difficult than cutting lumber. You can use a chop saw or SkilSaw with a metal cutting blade, in conjunction with tin snips.
The metal studs found at your local home improvement store will only come in the most popular dimensions. Unusual dimensions will need to be found at stores that cater to contractors. So, what you will find at your local Home Depot mainly are studs of the same dimension as wood 2x4's and in 25 gauge steel, ranging from 8 feet to 12 feet in length.
Cutting metal studs is more hazardous than cutting wood. While many home renovators treat safety as an optional measure when cutting wood, it is certainly not optional when cutting metal. And we're not just talking about the sparks that are caused by the circular saw. Cutting metal studs by hand with tin snips is a good recipe for lacerating skin, and the sound produced by an electric saw on metal studs will produce a ringing in your ears for the next week, should you forget to wear hearing protection.
Metal studs are not a "forgiving" material for the DIYer. The great thing about wood is that it is a very flexible, malleable, forgiving material. With metal, it's all or nothing.
When driving a drywall screw into a wood stud, the wood practically seems to draw the screw into it. Tapping a drywall screw into a metal stud requires a bit more work and practice.
Steel Studs - Metal Studs FAQs

cheers
Mark
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  #18  
Old 12-27-2009, 10:49 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: grapeview wa
Posts: 46
Default Re: Using wood framing

My oven sits on 8 - 4"x6" two in each corner. Oven is almost 2000 lb , solid as a rock.
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