#41  
Old 10-12-2009, 06:46 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: USA
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Default Re: Outdoor sink

I would just plumb the hot & cold together with a "t" and get ann adapter from I think 1/2 to 3/8 cut off your hose and just slip it over and hose clamp it on,, then of course connect the other end of the hose to the house spigot... I've done it before to a valve on a shower head on a waterslide I made for my grandkids I made one summer... (okay i went on it too) 7 feet high and about 25 feet long... It was pretty cool.... Just go to dome depot... If they cant set it up for you I will do it and send you a pic...
Cheers
Mark
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  #42  
Old 11-11-2009, 10:10 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NC
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Default Re: Outdoor sink

My sink area is an 8' Corian countertop I got several years ago @ Habitat Reuse Store... with double basin SS sink too. I only paid $70 and it still looks brand new. Solid Surfaces do great outdoors.

Until this week, it drained into a dry well... but putting final touches on my new outdoor shower and so my landscaper friend insisted on rerouting that so she dug up yard and laid pipe so it runs into garden spot... and put the grass back down so I can't even tell where she dug up.

I don't use THAT much water anyway, so no big deal.

I design outdoor kitchens and living rooms and design a large sink AND hot/cold water in every one! Not having a sink in outdoor kitchen/area makes no sense to me and having a sink w/out hot/cold water is next to having no sink! The purpose of an outdoor kitchen is to take living OUTdoors... and who wants to tote all the dirty stuff INside to wash?? To me, that is dysFUNctional!

I use my outdoor sink for washing collards in the fall when I do my big cook'n/freezer filling, veggie washing and canning in the summer, pet washing, bubble baths for my nephew till he outgrew it this year, big pot washing, potting/planting... all sorts of uses! And now my outdoor shower uses the same plumbing lines so it's multiFUNtional! I am getting ready to take out that sink and put in a new one with outdoor ice maker (I sell). So I'll plumb that in with my new sink area. And I've already been offered more than I paid for that countertop, so no loss there. If you're not friends with your local Habitat Store, become one! Deals abound on everthing from trees and plants to doors... and that's where I got the "walls" for my shower... old louvered doors... really kewl! Can't see thru them but air can circulate... and just $5/door. Nice Price.

My sink is my FAVORITE thing in my outdoor living space, hands down! Once you have one you will wonder why you ever thought you didn't need it... it's an outdoor best friend.
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  #43  
Old 11-12-2009, 06:06 PM
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Default Re: Outdoor sink

Welocme aboard Pirate!

I enjoy my sink as well, been waiting for it for a long time.

Christo.
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  #44  
Old 11-13-2009, 05:06 AM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Default Re: Outdoor sink

im planning to install my sink in the spring, I want to put a ss sink into my counter top,,
I have a 4 gal hot water heater (electric) I got for free... Only problem is my countertop is 4 1/2 sold hard maple.... gonns be a tough hole to cut,, probably use a sawz all,, maybe even chain saw for the straight cuts, Im a little afraid that might be a little hard to handle and do nicely,,, Open to suggestions
Thanks Mark
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  #45  
Old 11-14-2009, 01:37 AM
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Location: Adelaide, South Australia
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Thumbs up Re: Outdoor sink

Mark,
that shouldn't cause too much of a problem, although 4 1/2" thick top is little overkill.
I would carefully measure out the hole several times, then get a good quality hole saw the radius to suit the corners of the bowl. I doubt that any could cut the full depth in a single go and will need to be chiseled out and then a second depth cut made. A good circular saw or your suggested chainsaw can then be used for the straight cuts.
You will then have to make up special clips and extended screws to screw the sink down to the bench top or drill from underneat to a depth that the standard clips will reach.

Neill
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  #46  
Old 11-14-2009, 04:15 AM
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Default Re: Outdoor sink

Quote:
although 4 1/2" thick top is little overkill.
Not when you concider how many toppings some people put on a pizza....... Seriously neil, That was ust one of many nice pieces available at the sawmill, weighing in at over 300 lbs,, it was tuff work mounting it to the outside of the shed, then hoping the shed wouldnt tip over... I have a milwaukee hole hawg, If your familiar with that i can drill holes with the extension all the way thru, self feeding bits... Im gonna have to find a sink to fit properly and not have trouble running the supply lines.... I can probably save the cut out and make a nice cutting board out of it, Or maybe a spare oven door,,

Cheers
Mark

Last edited by ThisOldGarageNJ; 08-16-2010 at 05:50 PM.
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  #47  
Old 11-14-2009, 08:26 AM
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Location: Alabama
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Default Re: Outdoor sink

No chain saws!

Seriously, make the stop cuts with the circular (after drilling the starts, of course) as deep as possible and finish with a keyhole saw*. It will take longer but won't run the risk of damaging that maple. Good wood is a terrible thing to waste!

Are your fixture openings on the sink, or are you going to have to drill the maple for them?

*Yes, it's a handsaw. Not everything needs a motor!
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  #48  
Old 11-14-2009, 10:07 AM
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Default Re: Outdoor sink

Quote:
...keyhole saw ** Yes, it's a handsaw. Not everything needs a motor!
There's a specialized keyhole saw for use on drywall, with carbide teeth so it stays sharp. If you need to buy one, this is definitely the one to buy.

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  #49  
Old 11-14-2009, 03:29 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Default Re: Outdoor sink

Quote:
...keyhole saw ** Yes, it's a handsaw. Not everything needs a motor!
You mean they really make saws that dont run on electric,battery,gas.... Thats kinda like using an oven that doesnt run on gas (hahaha) Thanks all for the help.. In the spring i will follow all these usefull suggestios,, I ust found out there is a habitat reuse store about 45 mins away so hopefully over the winter i can pick up a used SS sink... I prefer to re use if possible..
Cheers
Mark

P.S. David.. Is that the brand they sell at Lowe's ??,, looks like a nice saw

Last edited by ThisOldGarageNJ; 11-14-2009 at 03:32 PM.
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  #50  
Old 11-15-2009, 02:30 AM
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Thumbs up Re: Outdoor sink

Mark,
when I made my bench tops, I had 3 slabs of dry River Red Gum which were around 4" thick, Rather than wasting the 3 slabs, I ripped 2 down to 1 1/2" x 4" strips, thicknessed them and then biscuit joined them around the sink hole that I needed. This saved a lot of wasted timber and I still have one for another project.
Also, don't take any notice of using a chainsaw, just make sure it is sharp and handle it with caution - or spend hours on a key hole saw.
I can think of better things to exert my energies on!

Neill
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