Go Back   Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community > Outdoor Kitchens and Living Rooms > Outdoor Kitchen Design

Like Tree2Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 08-14-2012, 01:57 PM
texman's Avatar
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Amarillo, Texas
Posts: 587
Default Re: Outdoor kitchen in Texas

hey russell
thanks for stopping in on this thread. I started this one because of all the things that are unrelated to wfo that go into an outdoor kitchen. like concrete countertops. getting close i hope. should pour counters this weekend. i got the chimney pipe yesterday, so plenty of work awaits.
Great job on your dome closure! you should feel 20# lighter
tracy
__________________
My Progress:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 08-15-2012, 09:54 AM
texman's Avatar
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Amarillo, Texas
Posts: 587
Post Re: Outdoor kitchen in Texas

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
It is the same, it can be painted on as a surface bonder or added to the mix water as an integral bonder. You want to mix it as an integral bonding agent, the ratio of water to bonding agent depends upon the particular product as they come in various concentrations.

A small handful of fiber per bag of concrete, a normal bag is good for 1 CuYd of concrete (1.5# bag), for the corbeling I don't know without seeing how you are doing the base.
This is the bonding adhesive at lowes. Is this the correct stuff and how would you mix?
QUIKRETE Gallon Bonding Adhesive
Item #: 10428 | Model #: 990201
Shop QUIKRETE Gallon Bonding Adhesive at Lowes.com
The attached picture is of the base. It is 8x16 cmu filled with concrete and full brick veneer of chicagos. Does that give you enough info ?
I am going to get the fiber and rod at lunch. Sorry to be a bonehead, but not sure i follow
Quote:
If you were to bend the wire in shallow arcs back and forth it would be even better since it is slick rod.
The rod will overlap and be wire tied, do you mean bend at those intersections?
Thanks for all the help. I obviously need it.
Tracy
Attached Thumbnails
Outdoor kitchen in Texas-052912d.jpg  
__________________
My Progress:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 08-15-2012, 11:33 AM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 3,091
Default Re: Outdoor kitchen in Texas

Short of cutting brick out, the cobeling isn't going to work. Bend the wire in shallow arcs along the length, not kinked just not straight.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 08-15-2012, 05:04 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 3,091
Default Re: Outdoor kitchen in Texas

You said the overhang is 12", how deep is the counter top behind that?
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 08-15-2012, 06:01 PM
texman's Avatar
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Amarillo, Texas
Posts: 587
Default Re: Outdoor kitchen in Texas

the counter top base is 12" as well. So total counter is 24".
Tracy
__________________
My Progress:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 08-15-2012, 06:46 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 3,091
Default Re: Outdoor kitchen in Texas

Normally you would want any cantilevered projection to be no more than 1/3 of the total bending member, and that is for an anchored cantilever with sufficient thickness to allow steel reinforcement to operate to design capacities.

I don't know, if you plan on having hot nekkid chicks dancing on the bar it will probably fail, but under normal sedate use it will probably be OK. I can't really give you a solution, but I would probably reduce the overhang to 6-8" since I ALWAYS anticipate hot nekkid chicks dancing on my bar.
billwil likes this.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 08-16-2012, 06:10 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 3,091
Default Re: Outdoor kitchen in Texas

OK, I thought about it today, and I think you can make the corbels work and not look like crap. 4 corbels, 1 at each end and two more splitting the difference into 3 sections.

Kind of like in this pic (Pay no attention to the dust bunnies and general cord disorder, I move stuff around a lot). Bring the bottom of the support down as far as you can. Notch it into the existing brickwork at the lower end. I don't know what the rest of your kitchen style is but rough wood may work, and finished if not.



edit for spellink.
Attached Thumbnails
Outdoor kitchen in Texas-corbels.jpg  

Last edited by Tscarborough; 08-16-2012 at 06:13 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 08-17-2012, 06:46 AM
texman's Avatar
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Amarillo, Texas
Posts: 587
Default Re: Outdoor kitchen in Texas

If i can get Hot nekkid chix on my bar, I will hold it up myself or let it break so maybe i could catch them before they got away.
I have been trying to school myself on this some more. That is a good idea on the corbels and might work. My cabinets are rough stained cedar. I found some I braces

These guys are discussing this same setup and they think it would work with your combination of fiber, steel and stronger concrete. I even saw some test videos of cantilevered concrete 2" thick with 24" unsupported holding 350# of sand at the outermost edge. That setup had much more supported on cabinet than i will which as i understand is what makes the beam concept perform.
As you pointed out earlier, i dont have enough base to support my 12" cantilever without corbels or something else. MAybe the Hot nekkid chicks would hold it up for me!Wishing.
I think the I braces might help, but wouldn't prevent a failure. IMO
I am thinking of going to 2" thickness for one thing. I am thinking or your corbels or maybe just 4 vertical supports of some configuration. Back to the drawing board.
Tracy
Attached Thumbnails
Outdoor kitchen in Texas-img_1768.jpg  
__________________
My Progress:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 08-17-2012, 12:41 PM
texman's Avatar
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Amarillo, Texas
Posts: 587
Default Re: Outdoor kitchen in Texas

I am thinking that reducing my cantilevered bar top to 8" from 12" may be the best option here. Redoing my form is going to be easier than building four corbels and getting them set in the existing brick. 8" is 2" greater than the 1/3 of total rule. The fiber, maximizer and 1/4 rod should make that work. The hot chicks will have to be more careful where they dance. The main concern was knee room at the bar. I don't think anyone will be spending a great deal of time sitting at the bar when all the hot nekkid chix are dancing on it.
Tracy
__________________
My Progress:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 08-17-2012, 03:02 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 3,091
Default Re: Outdoor kitchen in Texas

That sounds like the best plan of action. Now let's talk about Maximiser. It is a great product, but it has one issue that can cause problems. It uses lightweight aggregate, which is expanded shale. This causes problems if you are not ready for it because the aggregate is at nearly zero percent moisture. It sucks all the mix water out and causes a flash set before you can get it placed.

Here is the best way to mix it, either by hand or in a mixer. Mix 3/4 of a bag with the recommended amount of water stated on the bag, then add the last quarter. In your case, assuming a mixer, here is the sequence:


All the recommended water, holding back a small amount. Do not forget to add the bonding agent to the mix water, about 1 gallon of bonder to 8 gallons of water.

The fibers, a small handful per bag of Max is fine.

Concrete dye if you are using it.

3/4 of a bag of Max. Let mix for 2-3 minutes, then add the rest. If it is too stiff, add a little more of the mix water, the texture you are looking for will roll in the mixer, not slop. Total mix time 5 or so minutes.

Edit- The other thing about any concrete is that it hits a point after being mixed for 4 or 5 minutes that is looks too dry, then it relaxes. Excess water is not your friend in this type of concrete placement, so be frugal.

Last edited by Tscarborough; 08-17-2012 at 03:06 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Texas suppliers of refractory materials...Keyword = Refractory Lburou Finding Building Materials 1 12-16-2010 11:42 AM
Hello from Texas gdest Western US 0 02-09-2010 08:40 AM
North Texas resources Roadkyng Newbie Forum 1 02-04-2009 01:36 PM
Olive Trees james Outdoor Kitchen Design 29 02-01-2009 09:15 AM
Any Ovens in North Texas? Roadkyng Newbie Forum 6 01-25-2009 09:43 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:13 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC