#11  
Old 04-06-2008, 08:58 AM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Location: Mishigame & Iberia
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Default Re: Learning a new language

OI mate....

Ein Prosit, Ein Prosit, der gemiitlichkeit
Ein Prosit, Ein Prosit, der gemiitlichkeit
.... Eins, zwei, Drei g'suffa!
Zicke, zacke, zicke, zacke, hoi, hoi, hoi,
Zicke, zacke, zicke, zacke, hoi, hoi, hoi,
Prosit
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Tiempo para guzarlos.....
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...enjoy every sandwich!
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  #12  
Old 04-06-2008, 05:09 PM
Journeyman
 
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Location: Australia
Posts: 297
Default Re: Learning a new language

Unbearable!
J.
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  #13  
Old 04-06-2008, 10:00 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Fethiye Turkey
Posts: 265
Default Re: Learning a new language

James ...........lots of good advice already given. Have a look at this site

Language course

It is useful for developing vocabulary and of course the all important pronunciation. The Lite version is free so it is well worth having a look.

Rosetta Stone is really good. It's an unfortunate fact that learning is kids stuff. It gets a little more difficult the older you are. The only advice I would give is never be afraid of getting it wrong. Most people are generous when it comes to your making mistakes and will help with corrections. The attempt will be appreciated. It is amazing to realise that it is possible to spend a lot of time with someone who does'nt speak your language, nor you theirs, and have a great time doing it.

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  #14  
Old 04-06-2008, 11:12 PM
Master Builder
 
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Location: Washington State USA
Posts: 777
Default Re: Learning a new language

For what it's worth, a couple of years ago my wife and I met an young English woman who was working at a British Pub on The Charente River in France ("Les Gabariers" at Saint-Simeux). We were doing the canal boat thing and asked her how hard was it for her to make the language transition (as she had said in conversation that she spoke not a word of French before arriving six months previous). Her answer was to learn to conjugate the verbs "to be", "to have" and "to want" and one can get by quite well. Unfortunately these are irregular verbs. The "to be" is obvious, however, if you can learn to conjugate "to have" and "to want" simply adding the infinite of whatever verb for whatever action you wish and you can make yourself understood. Much easier than memorizing alot of conjugations of other verbs at least to start off or for short stays in country.

I'm sure that it helped that she was both young and good looking. But the advice sure made sense.

Wiley
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  #15  
Old 04-07-2008, 05:39 AM
egalecki's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Location: Virginia
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Default Re: Learning a new language

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiley View Post
Her answer was to learn to conjugate the verbs "to be", "to have" and "to want" and one can get by quite well. Unfortunately these are irregular verbs.
Wiley
All the really good verbs are irregular...
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  #16  
Old 04-07-2008, 06:21 AM
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Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Location: Allschwil, Switzerland
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Default Re: Learning a new language

so the advo is conjo irrego verbs and memo vocabo?

...hmmm, I dunno, but maybe my aussie still needs some work....
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  #17  
Old 04-07-2008, 05:19 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Australia
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Default Re: Learning a new language

Inish,
What a daunting list of langeages.
Sadly, Australian remains unlisted.....
teach.
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  #18  
Old 04-07-2008, 07:19 PM
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Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Longview, WA
Posts: 2,021
Default Re: Learning a new language

There's only 5 forms of conjugation for each of those verbs, (I, you, you unfamiliar, they, them). For these: to be, to have, and to want, that's just 15 variations you need to learn. A couple of hours work, huh?

To need is similar to the meaning of want but isn't a bad one to learn either. There's probably 10 or 15 others that you use regularly that are irregular conjugations. I can't think of a single one right now.
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  #19  
Old 04-07-2008, 08:58 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Fethiye Turkey
Posts: 265
Default Re: Learning a new language

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff View Post
Inish,
What a daunting list of langeages.
Sadly, Australian remains unlisted.....
teach.
That would require someone who is fluent in both Aussie and English to volunteer and you know what they say about that practice. Maybe another job for the woofer...............

It would, however, make a valuable addition to the new FB video slot and undoubtedly get a nomination for BOTM.

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  #20  
Old 04-12-2008, 11:37 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pebble Beach, CA
Posts: 4,648
Default Re: Learning a new language

Quote:
Originally Posted by Inishta View Post
...

It's an unfortunate fact that learning is kids stuff. It gets a little more difficult the older you are.
That's sure true. But, I have read numerous articles which say that learning a second (or third) language as an adult has been shown to ward off Alzheimer's -- a very good thing. None of those senior moments.

The Rosetta Stone arrived a couple of days ago, and 48-hours in, I am very impressed. I uses a microphone and speech recognition to help with your accent, and it is very interactive -- and it is is going to be teaching articles, verb conjugation, masculine/feminine, vocabulary, etc. through interesting exercises -- without rote memorization.

I started Italian using CDs and cassettes in the car, and had no idea what I sounded like. Imagine my surprise the first few times I tried to talk to an Italian on vacation -- sometimes they knew what mean, and more of time time that would look blankly back, as if so say "what is he going." :-)

I'm taking David's advice (hopefully) and try to do a lesson a day -- a little bit every day.

James
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