#11  
Old 11-22-2007, 07:21 AM
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Default Re: How many of us are also Homebrewers?

Yes Happy Thanksgiving to all! And a belated Happy Thanksgiving to the Canadians! Make sure to post the photos of your beautifull WFO roast turkey and trimmings!
Best
Dutch
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  #12  
Old 11-22-2007, 08:14 AM
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Default Re: How many of us are also Homebrewers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by thebadger View Post
I'm lucky to have a beer supply shop close by.
Me, too, but I haven't brewed in quite a while. Good for you!

I saw a news article a couple of weeks ago about the current shortage of hops and the cost impact on beer. The price is going up, of course... nothing seems to go down in price.

I've done the kit beers with considerable success. After reading a couple of brewing boks I'm still not ready to grind-my-own, but might consider starting with dried malt(s) for a bit more flexibility. That might allow greater use of the varous yeasts and hops that are avaialbe to homebrewers.

I hope they are still in business... but have you ever run across MidWest Brewing Supplies. I found them on the internet a few years ago and they had a wonderful selection in their catalogue. But I much prefer personally visiting the local brewing shop... even if their selection is more limited.
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  #13  
Old 11-22-2007, 10:05 AM
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Default Re: How many of us are also Homebrewers?

Brian,

I haven't looked into Midwest but I might check them out. My place in Cincinnati has about 30+ beer kits to choose from which is plenty for me right now. Also, the are real knowledgable and I can get to their shop on my lunch hour. I'm hoping to brew up a porter in the next few weeks. I agree that you loose a little felxibility with the "kits" but with 3 young boys and the pizza oven project that's about all I have time for.

Good luck.

Dick
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  #14  
Old 07-09-2009, 02:35 PM
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Default Re: How many of us are also Homebrewers?

Just thought I'd bump this one back up. I am toying with a recipe right now based on the ingredients in Deschutes Inversion IPA. I'm planning on many iterations to see what the best combo of ingredients is, but here's what I've got so far.
8 # LME
1.5 # British 2-row
1 # Munich (Dark)
0.5 # Carastan
0.5 # Crystal 80L

1 oz Nugget (60 min)
1 oz Centennial (15 or 20 min)
1 oz Cascade (5 min)
1 oz Northern Brewer (1)

Wyeast 1098

I was thinking of moving the Centennial to a FWH.

Last edited by papavino; 07-09-2009 at 04:08 PM.
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  #15  
Old 07-09-2009, 05:41 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Default Re: How many of us are also Homebrewers?

Since Papavino reraised this thread I will throw in a comment for those of you who make beer!

Reinhart's Whole Grain Bread book has a killer recipe for spent grain whole wheat that is simply incredible IMO. The challenge is getting spent grain from beer making...but for those of you who are...you should be freezing your spent grain in batch quantities (about a cup as I recall) and making that bread.

Bread is life! (and pizza is heaven!)
Jay
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Old 07-09-2009, 06:20 PM
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Default Re: How many of us are also Homebrewers?

DARN... we just made a wheat beer. Had I known about the Reinhart bread I would have saved the spent wheat. I was the only one who did not like the wheat beer, but I'll want to make it again so I can make the bread!!
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  #17  
Old 07-09-2009, 07:34 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Default Re: How many of us are also Homebrewers?

Go for it Chef! It is simply one of the most spectacular whole grain breads I think I have ever had. With home brewed spent grain the "hominess" of it would be perfect! Please report back and let us know how it goes!

(PS: According to Reinhart the spent grain can be bagged and frozen for months...)
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  #18  
Old 07-10-2009, 09:33 AM
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Default Re: How many of us are also Homebrewers?

Papavino- is that a 5 gallon recipe? 1 full ounce of nugget for 60 minutes? You're a madman!

That's not too bad, actually... that recipe calculates out to a target gravity approaching 1.070 (assuming you use a full mash on the grains), with a little over 60 IBU (depending on hop variations). Definitely in the strong end of the scale, but quite respectable as an IPA. It just was startling to see such a big number; I'm used to brewing Belgian abbey style ales and German bocks, with about a third of the hop strength for about the same gravity.

I think the Centennial FWH would set off the malty, grainy Munich nicely. Centennial has such a bright, citrusy acidity that it might really clean up the flavor of the beer. There's a lot of sweetness there; with a full pound of munich and another of crystal 80L and carastan, you've got about 15% of your fermentables in the form of caramelized malts.

Strong malts need strong hops; such a strongly flavored beer will need some vibrant flavors on your pizza as well... Try something with some sharp cheese and rosemary, maybe?

Speaking of bright, hoppy ales... have you tried any of the special releases from Lagunitas Brewery? If you like hoppy pales and ambers in the west coast style, they're at the head of the pack. I don't know how widely they are distributed, as they are a northern California micro, but if you get a chance try their "little sumpin' sumpin'" ale, you may never look at IPA the same way again.
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Last edited by cynon767; 07-10-2009 at 09:42 AM.
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  #19  
Old 07-10-2009, 05:25 PM
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Default Re: How many of us are also Homebrewers?

Cynon,

It is a 5 gallon batch. I went and picked up the ingredients for it today. The cascades are on the high AA side at 7.8 %. I had to sub those for Centennial as my usual shop is all out. I might make an run to another shop tomorrow just to see if I can get them. It should end up, like you said, around 1.070 or so on the OG and at about 1.018 for the FG. Lots of sweetness, maltiness and acidity to go around.

We do get the occasional Lagunitas seasonal up here in Seattle. Mostly on tap at some of the better pubs, but sometimes in 6 packs.

On the bread note, I saved some grain from a lager I made back in February and made about 4 loaves of bread with it, but that was hardly enough to make a dent in the pile of spent grain that I had. I might have to use most of the grain for compost.
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  #20  
Old 07-10-2009, 10:18 PM
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Default Re: How many of us are also Homebrewers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by papavino View Post
On the bread note, I saved some grain from a lager I made back in February and made about 4 loaves of bread with it, but that was hardly enough to make a dent in the pile of spent grain that I had. I might have to use most of the grain for compost.
There's nothing wrong with good compost... and spent grains make some of the best. They're even better as a supplement to animal feed, but not too many folks keep barnyard hogs or chickens these days... though with current prices of eggs, the thought is a bit tempting sometimes.

I've never tried the spent grain bread, although I imagine that the rather high ratio of fiber to carbohydrate might make it a bit, well, toothsome. It's probably pretty darn healthy though, eh? I'm intrigued. Is it really good? I'm excited to try it! I've got a big witbier brew coming up... I'll have to save my grains!
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