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Old 12-18-2007, 09:57 PM
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Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Location: Carson City, NV
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Default Re: Barter, trade, exchange.... interested?

James, I'm sure that there is plenty of barter material to make it work. It could be the Forno Bravo equivalent to Craig's List.

Dave, I'm not sure what sage brush is good for except giving rabbits and quail some cover (and a gazzion other things you wouldn't want to eat). But seriously, we do have pine nuts. A pain to open but a unique taste. They are probably all covered in snow right now but we can barter next season. What kind of environment does it take for pecans to grow? Apples. grapes. cherries do well here - it is hit or miss with the spring temps though.


Les...
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  #12  
Old 12-18-2007, 10:42 PM
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Default Re: Barter, trade, exchange.... interested?

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Originally Posted by Les View Post
James, I'm sure that there is plenty of barter material to make it work. It could be the Forno Bravo equivalent to Craig's List.

Les...
Les, exactly. Plus, we are free, and only focused on building, cooking, fired, pizza, dough, olive oil, food, bread, etc.

If anyone else wants to jump in, perhaps we have a new Category.

James
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  #13  
Old 12-19-2007, 01:11 AM
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Default Re: Barter, trade, exchange.... interested?

... I've got two very nice chimney pieces that I don't need. Only they're heavy. If someone came through here by car maybe? (yeah right, from the US or Australia...)

So let me think... Swiss chocolate? Swiss cheese? I can't really think of anything we have here that you probably can't get anywhere else, but its still a really cool idea.
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  #14  
Old 12-19-2007, 03:14 AM
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Default Re: Barter, trade, exchange.... interested?

James, Dave, all,

I think this is a very cool idea that would be good for our community. The only hurdle I could see is sending foodstuffs across international boundaries unless we're creative about descriptions. I'd be more than willing to ship off some of my mature sourdough starter in return for some pecans. Here, they're scarce, expensive and really not very good. The best ones I ever had were in Florida, from Georgia, I think.

Fiddleheads are an acquired taste. I've harvested and cooked them, too, but for me they rank right down there with beets. Bouquet of somebody's basement. Might lose my citizenship on that one. I'm not a hockey fan, either. Oops.

Course, then there's genuine back bacon (what south of the border is called Canadian bacon). Here, we slice it thick or cook a big chunk as a roast, usually with a Dijon type coating. Not too shabby. I won't mention Canadian beer or wild morel mushrooms or horsetail mushrooms.

Maple syrup? Great drizzled on some of that freshly fallen snow. Curious thing about our northern rep for the white stuff. Places like Rochester, Buffalo and Albany get a lot more than we do. Ditto, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

How about trees? We have lots of those. Maple, anyone? Hockey pucks? Curling rocks (nope, too heavy). Ribena? Marmite, yeech. (I can hear the OZ connection rising up in arms over Vegimite.)

Frances, I'm absolutely certain that the cheese you get is much finer than what we see here, unless you go, credit card in hand, to a specialty shop like Alex Farms in Toronto. Then again, there's the wonderful artisanal butter and cheeses coming out of Quebec and eastern Ontario.

It's not even remotely Canadian, but I am able to get Sel Marin de Guerande, grey sea salt from Brittany. Like Caputo, once you try it, you'll never go back. It comes either as stone ground (fine) or chunky (like Kosher salt). Hey, if bread god Lionel Poilane recommended it, it must be good. The chunky version on bagels or focaccia is a revelation.

Jim
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Last edited by CanuckJim; 12-19-2007 at 03:40 AM. Reason: Incomplete
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