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  #41  
Old 03-29-2013, 03:45 AM
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Location: Bohol Philippines
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Default Re: Red Clay Brick Oven in the Philippine Islands

Been a few years since I was here but finally the houses are 99% done and I'm getting ready to start on the pizza oven. Right now we're sourcing some really great red clay we've seen in various pottery and tripod stoves made in the area. When we find it we'll mold, sun dry and fire the bricks ourselves, only way to be sure. Also planning a trip to Camiguin Island, a volcanic island to get perlite, aka pumice. Have a question about this stuff, is it ash or little lava rocks?

Another question, to insulate I'm considering layers. Two filled voids defined by three layers of fire brick (1st) and refractory concrete. (2nd & 3rd) Firewood is at a premium here and they also use "coconut coal" which is dried, toasted, coconut shells. Plan on using rice husks in the fuel mix because unlimited quantities are basically free. So insulation has to be very well done to save $. First layer of the oven is the fire brick set with cement and capped with refractory concrete. Then I'll set some lava rocks into the refractory concrete to support the next layer with a void between filled with perlite 100%. Then we'll build a 1/4" plywood form with cutouts allowing the lava to come through. This form will eventually burn away I'm sure. When we pour perlite rich refractory concrete it will be held up by the lava rocks which also shouldn't conduct heat due to the holes in lava. Above this poured layer, with more lava rock supports, I'll put fiberglass insulation. Someone mentioned the outside of their oven was 150 degrees. Even if my oven is this hot with a perlite filled void that's still not hot enough to harm fiberglass insulation, yes? Attics in the desert get hotter than that and fiberglass insulation is used. Then I'll encase the fiberglass in a void and pour a final layer of refractory concrete, using again lava rock supports through to the previous layer of concrete. Both voids are bridged by lava rocks. Then a nice tile mosaic...etc, then pizza. Sound reasonable? Good plan? Help me make it better, any ideas?

Here's a pic, the seawall addition is now done. The pizza oven will go on the main floor front right side. Just below and before the blue water tank.



What it looks like up above...





The circular thing sticking out of the seawall is the pool. In yellow is Abby, 3 year old girl we're adopting with her 2 yo brother Augustine.



New lapdog, Gary, and me.



That's it, any help would be much appreciated. We're moving to make the wood fired pizza oven dream a reality! Help!

Last edited by Lancer; 03-29-2013 at 06:25 AM.
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  #42  
Old 03-30-2013, 09:13 PM
cobblerdave's Avatar
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Default Re: Red Clay Brick Oven in the Philippine Islands

Gudday
I have used fiberglass house insulation as a secondary insulation. 2in of ceramic insulation take the heat out first and drop the temp that the rockwool has to bear. If and only if, the pearlite layer drops the heat right down should you consider using it. The fiberglass has plastic binders that will not be pleasant and perhaps poisonous when they burn off.
I did not mention temps on purpose as it depends on the manufacturer and the purpose it was made. So as long as your willing to change you mind on using fiberglass if that pearlite doesnt drops the temps sufficiently you can concider it. By the way the pealite layer will have to be dry not just the cement cured to work correctly, wet it will still transmitt heat.
Hope this helps
Regards dave
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  #43  
Old 03-30-2013, 10:06 PM
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Default Re: Red Clay Brick Oven in the Philippine Islands

The perlite should remain dry as the only holes into the void will be from the bottom up, for venting moisture out the base while the heat stays up.

The plastic coating you mentioned, I didn't know about that, thanks. I'll make the perlite filled void thicker...was planning 3" thick, I'll go 4". Thanks cobblerdave

Btw, hows the election going down under? I have 2 Aussie friends, one wants change of government the other wants reelection.

Last edited by Lancer; 03-30-2013 at 10:40 PM.
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  #44  
Old 03-30-2013, 10:56 PM
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Default Re: Red Clay Brick Oven in the Philippine Islands

cobblerdave, want to ask your opinion on something. I read through the first page of your thread on your build, so far. Very nice btw, great look. Anyway your platform is square and your oven a round dome. Therefore any rain that ends up on the square part of the platform that's not covered or enclosed by the dome tends to "wick" as I think you put it, as wax gets pulled up a wick, into the dome adding moisture. I've come up with a plan and I want to know what you think. My plan is to make the platform round, a circle like the base of the dome, but 3 inches smaller than the dome. Then a 1/4" strip of plywood wrapped around the circular platform. Now build the triple layer dome with the final layer on the outside overlapping and enclosing the platform by 3". When its all set up remove the plywood strip from between the platform and dome. Now there's expansion and contraction joint for differing rates of dome vs platform...no stress cracks. The dome sits on the platform and also encloses it. Any water that lands on the dome runs off like a roof and gets no chance to land on the platform and wick in.

Its just an idea, what do you think, will it help keep out rain?

Last edited by Lancer; 03-30-2013 at 11:43 PM.
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  #45  
Old 03-30-2013, 11:30 PM
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Default Re: Red Clay Brick Oven in the Philippine Islands

General question...

There is a limestone mining business a couple hundred meters down the road. A friend of mine here, his wife is related to the owners and can get us in. There I should be able to find very high quality crushed limestone. I'm considering mixing the cement as follows:

1 part limestone, crushed fine
1 part red clay
3 parts sand
1 part Portland cement

What do you folks think?

I don't know if I can find cooked limestone here, or "lime", but I could cook the limestone, at least somewhat, when we fire the bricks, would that be better?

Last edited by Lancer; 03-30-2013 at 11:33 PM.
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  #46  
Old 03-30-2013, 11:40 PM
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Default Re: Red Clay Brick Oven in the Philippine Islands

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancer View Post

1 part limestone, crushed fine
Do a google on hydrated lime.
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  #47  
Old 03-30-2013, 11:57 PM
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Default Re: Red Clay Brick Oven in the Philippine Islands

Slaked lime, yes? How does it handle high heat, any ideas brickie in oz?

hydrated lime - definition of hydrated lime by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

hydrated lime - a caustic substance produced by heating limestone
calcium hydrate, calcium hydroxide, caustic lime, lime, lime hydrate, slaked lime
hydrated oxide, hydroxide - a compound of an oxide with water

Shop QUIKRETE 50 lb Hydrated Lime at Lowes.com

50 lb Hydrated Lime

For use in building construction
Can be mixed with Portland cement and other ingredients to make mortar mix and base coat stucco
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  #48  
Old 03-31-2013, 12:22 AM
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Default Re: Red Clay Brick Oven in the Philippine Islands

Never used it in an oven, I always use a bought pre made product.
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  #49  
Old 03-31-2013, 12:30 AM
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Default Re: Red Clay Brick Oven in the Philippine Islands

Gudday lancer
Brickie is a man of few words but he is right
Burn the lime (quick lime ) then hydrate it laborious and dangerous pay someone to do it ....ie buy it
On square vs round. I recon round is cool but I recon you better to have overhead protection in the Philippines.
My hearth insulation doesn't get to the edge of that slab. The render dome goes further out than that. Those corners are tiled and the gape between the tile and render sealed. The tile grout gape is reproofed yearly with a bond all product. Same as any brickwork you see. The chimney is capped. The chimney had a gape between it and the dome long since silasticed.
That leaves the last 2 entry points the dome brick and hearth.
The dome as with all brickwork draws in moisture just from the air, the Philippines that is very likely.
The hearth is a soak hole ..... Just pour a cup of water and watch it disappear. That's why I say overhead protection wood probably suit.
My oven gets damp in the summer (soaking this yr). But I don't use the oven much in the heat. The other 9 months are glorious cool and dry and sunny. Perfect for entertaining and enjoying the outdoors and the oven.
Regards dave
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  #50  
Old 04-01-2013, 03:12 AM
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Default Re: Red Clay Brick Oven in the Philippine Islands

Dang I was in the city today (What passes for a city on this island) and completely forgot to check to see if lime is available ready made.

Ah well, next time. Likely go back next week.

I'll give your overhead protection some thought Dave. Oh and Gudday to you mate. Had planned on tiling over the dome in a mosaic to help waterproof it, but it wouldn't be too difficult to put a nepa roof over. That's a local product, a plant which is usable for roofs and hardly hinders heat from rising through it so the working area would stay cool. Thing is its got to be replaced every 5 years. Still, with flashing built into the chimney it would keep everything dry enough.

How hot does the chimney get?: Could I use it as the center pole in an octagonal roof? In other words, attach 2X6s to it?

Last edited by Lancer; 04-01-2013 at 03:25 AM.
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