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berryst 06-28-2008 05:16 PM

I embark upon the jouney and the journey is the destination PICS POSTED
 
I could have read a how-to book ...but I haven't
I could have studied and planned but didn't
There are, before me, thousands of years of technology and the wisdom of millions who came before me.
I fear no evil. But I did watch utube! God help me I've started to build one of those wood fired ovens
I started with a barrel of wine. It was empty or the oven would have to wait. I cut it vertically. This forms my arch. It is beautiful in its taper, its graceful arch so perfect in size the universe seems to be in harmony. No fluffing around with those other arches. No! Just plunk it down cover it in brick and fill in the gaps for me. Bingo a 24 x 30 floor.
At least that is the plan or should I say folly.
But, first I had to deal with that blasted platform. Now those platforms look like a lot of work to me. So I just skipped that part. I just dug out a platform out of the sand bank just behind my back door.
My 6x7 foot pad is in. Lots of re bar Next, A rather pathetic stone wall to hold the bank up under hearth. Eventually I will cover it all with dirt and plant harmony on top. This way it will just look like a hearth with a hole in the wall the oven hidden under the earth.

?????MY FIRST QUESTION?????
Has any body heard of per-lite board... its used in roofing under torch down. Would this work? Or would this rather friable board be to soft? I would like to use it under the firebrick under the oven chamber. Help? I would like to start on the brick tomorrow.

berryst

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f9...n/100_3341.jpg

Ken524 06-28-2008 06:51 PM

Re: I embark upon the jouney and the journey is the destinationi
 
Barry,

I can't help you with the per-lite board, but your oven sounds interesting. I can't wait to see the pictures of this thing. Please post pics!

berryst 06-28-2008 11:08 PM

Re: I embark upon the jouney and the journey is the destinationi
 
I'll try some pics but I'm not to savey on posting pictures...old school I guess.
Not much to see at this point still waiting for something to go terribly wrong.
Berryst

CajunKnight 06-28-2008 11:12 PM

Re: I embark upon the jouney and the journey is the destinationi
 
Welcome aboard Berry, sounds like you have something going there. Let us know how it works out.

berryst 06-28-2008 11:17 PM

Re: I embark upon the jouney and the journey is the destinationi
 
Still looking for someone who knows if perlite board will work to insulate may slab.....any takers>
Berryst

brokencookie 06-28-2008 11:29 PM

Re: I embark upon the jouney and the journey is the destinationi
 
All the perlite boards I found were similar to this.

1. A perlite-based insulation board comprising:

between about 50% and about 76% by dry weight expanded, perlite;

between about 15% and about 45% by dry weight fibers wherein between about
50% and about 95% by dry weight of said fibers are recycled newsprint
fibers and between about 5% and about 50% by dry weight of said fibers are
virgin cellulose fibers which have not been subjected to chemical pulping
to remove lignin;


about 1% to about 5% by dry weight binder; (this is probaly some kind of glue)

about 2% to about 9% by dry weight bituminous material; ( This is asphalt ) and

about 0% to about 3% by dry weight alum.

On the basis of this I would give the product a pass. It looks like they are using it for roofing insulation. Low temperature stuff. Even though it will not be heated directly, it will be in contact with hot fire bricks. The standard perlite concrete used for Pompei ovens is a combination of concrete and perlite-- all pretty much non-flammable. I would say it's not worth taking a chance on. Making perlite concrete is pretty cheap and easy. If you would rather has the ease of using a finished board product, buy the FB insulating ( ceramic) board. A small investment in a good product will prevent many problems down the line with your oven.

Bruce

berryst 06-28-2008 11:50 PM

Re: I embark upon the jouney and the journey is the destinationi
 
Bruce
Thank you for your informed reply. Perlite is hard to find around here. It can be ordered but this takes time. My instincts were to NOT use the perlite board but its cheap and available....will keep looking thanks. Your timely reply is greatly appreciated.....and no its not raining in the pacific northwest today ....don't know what to make of this!
Berryst

brokencookie 06-29-2008 01:07 AM

Re: I embark upon the jouney and the journey is the destinationi
 
Last week we had spring, this week summer. Next week we might have winter again. I'm in Olympia and the weather is stranger than the politicitians. :D
You can also use vermiculite. It might be a little easier to find. Many times you can get it at garden centers or nurseries. Another option would be aireated concrete (AAC) or insulating concrete. Some of the guys on the forum have used this without a problem.
I urge you not to get too far ahead of yourself. If you look through the posts in the forum you will find that short cutting your insulation leads to wailing and sack cloth later. The FB chant is Insulate, Insulate, and Insulate again. There can never be enough insulation.

There is a supplier of industrial insulation in Kent. I can't think of the name right off the top of my head but they should be in the phone book.


Bruce

brokencookie 06-29-2008 01:19 AM

Re: I embark upon the jouney and the journey is the destinationi
 
I found it :rolleyes:

Bay Insulation Supply of Washington
7043 South 190th Street
Kent, WA 98032
Phone: 425-251-6750
Fax: 425-251-6225

These guys have everything :)

Bruce

SpringJim 06-29-2008 05:10 AM

Re: I embark upon the jouney and the journey is the destinationi
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by brokencookie (Post 36145)
The standard perlite concrete used for Pompei ovens is a combination of concrete and perlite-- all pretty much non-flammable. I would say it's not worth taking a chance on. Making perlite concrete is pretty cheap and easy.

Bruce

I'm not sure that we should use the "perlite concrete" terminology. It's actually a mixture of portland cement and perlite which is a mineral, not a gravel and more like a sand and dust mixture!

Mortar is usually sand and cement. Concrete is sand, cement and gravel.

I'd say what we're using is perlite mortar but it's usually an insulation layer...doesn't act much like mortar...so what's a good terminology?

It seems to be structural and we're putting a ton of weight on the hearth layer too!

just my obtuse brain musing......


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