#11  
Old 11-20-2006, 06:01 PM
CanuckJim's Avatar
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Default Tools

I'm with joengineer here, thinking that a separate tools posting would be helpful. I'm definitely in one camp, but, then again, I'm on the pro side of the equation, where multiple use is an issue. Nonetheless, sharing a bit on the tool side could be quite beneficial.

Jim
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  #12  
Old 11-21-2006, 12:44 AM
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Default Pro vs. homeowner

Jim,

That's a good point. You "pro's" use the same tools over and over, where the homeowner might only use a tool for a single job. The carpenters I worked with on our last extension always had the super-light worm drive circular saws -- which are expensive. I told one of them that there was a Makita on sale at Costco, and he jumped -- "I would never use one of those, too heavy, bad on the shoulder and back, etc."

When the new version of the forum software is up (we are waiting for our web host to update to mySQL 4.0), I can move individual tool postings here. There is lot, from power tools, to diamond blades, masonry tools, concrete mixers and pumps, etc.

James
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Last edited by james; 11-21-2006 at 10:03 AM.
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  #13  
Old 11-21-2006, 09:22 AM
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thank you!
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  #14  
Old 11-23-2006, 05:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by james
That's a good point. You "pro's" use the same tools over and over, where the homeowner might only use a tool for a single job.
The general rule is that if you use a tool every day you should have the best tool made by the hand of man. If you use it every month, you should have a good quality general tool, but if you use it only ocasionally you should buy the least tool that will do the job, or rent.

Quote:
I can move individual tool postings here. There is lot, from power tools, to diamond blades, masonry tools, concrete mixers and pumps, etc.
I nominate my concrete mixer tutorial currently here. (Concrete mixer basics)
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  #15  
Old 11-23-2006, 05:20 PM
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Default another angle to grind :-)

Hello there! Thanks to all for your various comments.

There is ONE consideration I forgot to mention: If I buy a cheap tool because I won't use it for long before I toss it, I waste the resources used to make it - and I encourage the makers of cheap and nasty goods to continue in their ways...

BTW of tools for the job: when I needed to fell a tree next to the foundation of the planned Pompeii oven, I used an American Bear bow to shoot an arrow with 60 lb fishing line attached into the crook of a high branch, then dragged up a heavy string to pull up a steel cable, to which I attached a high-tensile chain. A cheap and nasty hand winch (can't bring myself to toss it!), was next connected to another length of hi-tensile chain, which was looped around a distant tree. I then winched the cable taut to pull the chain in the direction I wanted it to fall. Only then did I make the kerf and felling cuts with my Stihl saw.

I bought the latter for nearly $A2000, after obtaining council permission to fell eight trees next to our house and learning that a pro tree surgeon would charge between $A1000 and $A2000 for EACH tree to be felled. The saw is now a year old, has felled and cut up some 20 trees and shows every indication of going to outlast me... (A smaller Stihl saw I bought 35 years ago is still in use for limbing and cutting small stuff.)

I use the bow-and-arrow technique on most larger trees, but often also resort to an American-made 'high-limb chain saw' - essentially a bit of saw chain attached to heavy lines for see-sawing across limbs - to reduce the falling impact of the tree by removing branches before felling it. This gadget has been worth every cent of its $A90 purchase price to me...

In the manner just described, I can lop or fell almost every tree single-handedly, although my wife sometimes has to help me with the see-sawing when the chain binds at narrow angles.

Cheers, and sorry if I abused my posting privilege with a boring tale...

Carioca
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  #16  
Old 11-23-2006, 05:35 PM
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Default Saws

Carioca,

Good on you. Never tried the bow technique, but it's got to work. Mine's a Husqvarna 61, some 20 years old now. Paid about $900 CDN for it, and it's been worth every penny. Just did its first overhaul, a carb kit. Other than that, plugs, grease, bars and chains. Good tools, like a Stihl saw, just keep on getting better. It's an old friend now.

I'm with you.

Jim
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  #17  
Old 11-24-2006, 01:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmun View Post
The general rule is that if you use a tool every day you should have the best tool made by the hand of man. If you use it every month, you should have a good quality general tool, but if you use it only ocasionally you should buy the least tool that will do the job, or rent.
Excellent advice.
James
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  #18  
Old 11-28-2006, 02:49 PM
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Default Shmear

Does the tools section encapsulate materials also? If so, I have a question. Does the Fefrax mortar hold as well as the heat stop? I want to keep my mortar joins at an eighth inch (just like my hero DMUN) and I'm all for the cream cheese consistency. Heat stop is willing to provide product placement mortar, but we have to pick it up from one of their suppliers in L.A. All of whom are mooks, none of whom have any in stock, or want to go out of their way to order us any in the time frame we would like. It'll be a couple of weeks till we get it, and I can't wait that long. I'm ready to drop the hammer on the Refrax if it will do a comparable job to Sir DMUN's incomparable mortar joins.
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  #19  
Old 11-29-2006, 01:24 PM
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Default Nick and Refrax

Nick,

Call Tammy (800 407 5119) and we can make this work. Just don't put Refrax on your bagels.

Refrax is a wonderful refractory mortar (better than the domestics), and you will enjoy it. It's easy to mix, easy to work with, sets fast (but not out of control like home-mixed Calcium Aluminate mortar), sets hard, and is waterproof. It will enjoy the limelight, and your oven.

Still, I am not sure this is the right forum...

Salute,
James
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