#11  
Old 07-29-2009, 07:18 PM
Les's Avatar
Les Les is offline
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Carson City, NV
Posts: 2,842
Default Re: The Right Tool for the Job

Quote:
Originally Posted by fxpose View Post
Go to any construction site. Building blocks and bricks are dry cut.
Not really true. My neighbor has a monster wet saw that will cut block. Installing pavers and BBQ island's, you will need to cut brick/stone. But.... with proper design you should never need to cut a block (other than miters)
__________________
Check out my pictures here:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


If at first you don't succeed... Skydiving isn't for you.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-30-2009, 09:23 AM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 942
Default Re: The Right Tool for the Job

Oops.....you guys are right. After speaking to one of our clients who happens to be a general contractor, wet saws are generally used and in many instances, mandatory.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-30-2009, 12:17 PM
jmhepworth's Avatar
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kaysville, Utah
Posts: 291
Default Re: The Right Tool for the Job

It seems like the only post I ever make promotes the HF saw. Not only is it on sale, but if you register on their website they send a 20% off coupon by email now and then. I just got one today. I used the saw to cut pavers for a path and patio, and the firebrick is so much softer than pavers that it cuts almost too easily. The pavers chewed up the blade faster than the firebrick does as well. I strongly recommend hearing and eye protection. I've also had it grab a firebrick and pull it out of my hands to the back of the saw, so keep hands and fingers to the side of the blade.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 07-30-2009, 06:21 PM
Serf
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 21
Default Re: The Right Tool for the Job

The main reason other than the mess and respiratory concerns is the damage to the saw. The dust is so fine it will damage a normal saw if it gets into the motor or any unsealed bearings. If that's not a concern than there isn't a difference.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-01-2009, 12:29 PM
Neil2's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 1,374
Default Re: The Right Tool for the Job

I rented a water bath saw for the bulk cutting into halfs, thirds etc. Cut them all in an hour.

For the beveling cuts as you proceed up the dome, a chop saw will work OK. And you can use it for other tasks. To cut down on dust and to extend the life of the cutting blade, soak the bricks in a pail of water for 1/2 hour or so or until they stop bubbling.

Last edited by Neil2; 08-01-2009 at 12:32 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08-19-2009, 08:21 AM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: kansas
Posts: 134
Default Re: The Right Tool for the Job

I have some questions for you about cutting bricks - Harbor Freight's brick cutter is 259.00 - And we have a store right here in Topeka. However, they also have what looks like to me (I don't know anything about this stuff...but I'm learning...) is a manual brick cutter. I know, if that's what it is, it will take FOREVER, and could be tedious, but can that work?

Can you rent brick cutters?

Can it happen, that if you are inexperienced, and you cut all your bricks at once (with a rental), that you could have cut them all wrong?

Thanks
Cecelia
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-19-2009, 11:36 AM
jmhepworth's Avatar
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kaysville, Utah
Posts: 291
Default Re: The Right Tool for the Job

I can't imagine building the oven without a power tool to cut the bricks. I'm sure the professionals can do it, but I couldn't. I also don't think I could have done it with a rental. There were too many times when I needed to shave a bit off a brick to make it fit better. I needed to trim corners from the very first course to avoid those skinny isosceles triangles. There is no way I could have anticipated those to cut them in advance, and there is no way I could have trimmed the brick manually. There were many times, however, when I wished I had a compound miter saw. I don't think well in three dimensions, so a tool that thinks that way for me would have been very helpful. Instead, I shimmed a lot on the HF saw trying to get the right angle, and I had to start over on some of the bricks more than once, particularly in the transition to the arch. That was a bear. If I had the oven to build over again, I would buy the HF saw.

Joe
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 08-19-2009, 12:57 PM
dmun's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: New Jersey USA
Posts: 4,216
Default Re: The Right Tool for the Job

You can rent a brick saw. Beware of places that charge for blade wear - it's a rip-off! If you have to use such a place rent the wet saw without the blade, and buy your own blade.

That said, there's only so much you can do in one day, and you may find you want to fit your bricks more carefully as you go up. I don't regret buying the HF saw. If you really don't need it you can resell it on ebay or craigslist, and end up paying not much more than you would have paid for a day's rental.

What I rented is a concrete mixer, separate trips for both pours. That was cheap to rent, and nothing I wanted to store.
__________________
My geodesic oven project:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Favorite pan, tool or gadget james Get Cooking 42 04-11-2014 10:05 PM
Oven Tool lenght mannextdoor Chit Chat 7 11-29-2008 05:58 PM
Pizza oven Tool Sets Acoma Tools, Tips and Techniques 20 03-16-2008 03:45 AM
What's in your cooking tool chest... Xabia Jim Get Cooking 9 08-05-2007 10:14 PM
cooking tool chest Xabia Jim Tools, Tips and Techniques 1 12-18-2006 09:05 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:25 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC