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  #111  
Old 02-22-2013, 08:43 AM
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Default Re: If you had the chance to rebuild your oven, what would you change?

Quote:
Originally Posted by banhxeo76 View Post
If I had a chance to rebuild my WFO................ I would build it without being married. No wife to complain about me spending to much too time with my true love.
Ha....the first one I built at our home, the good woman called herself a WFO widow. She doesn't mind this time around, because of how much she enjoyed the first one. Or she just doesn't miss my company...either way, I'm happy to be building another.
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  #112  
Old 02-24-2013, 05:59 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: durban, south africa
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Default Re: If you had the chance to rebuild your oven, what would you change?

I would make it bigger, (mine is about 1m in diameter), and my doorway is a little narrow, and a bit deep, otherwise, this is probably the best home built thing ever!
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  #113  
Old 02-25-2013, 10:30 PM
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Location: Wallingford, Vermont
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Default Re: If you had the chance to rebuild your oven, what would you change?

I've been baking in my 42" Pompeii (4.5" floor, no cladding, 17" dome height) every week or two for a year now. I work nights, and I usually do pizza for lunch & leftovers (2 or 3 18-20" NY style, or a dozen Neapolitan when the weather is warm). The next day I've got 400+ degrees, so I burn a moderate fire for a couple of hours and bake 20-30 loaves of bread. If I were to build again, I'd go bigger (46-48") and lower (14" or so). And maybe mobile (or at least towable)...
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  #114  
Old 03-24-2013, 09:45 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Cochrane, Alberta
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Default Re: If you had the chance to rebuild your oven, what would you change?

I put in a soldier course on the bottom row, not necessary, with a 1 meter diameter, the dome would have had sufficient height.
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  #115  
Old 03-24-2013, 06:37 PM
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Default Re: If you had the chance to rebuild your oven, what would you change?

Agreed Spunkoid, especially if you want a low dome oven. The issue gets worst as you increase the dia. I have a 60" oven and I would definitely remove the soldier course and start the dome right at the floor.
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  #116  
Old 03-24-2013, 10:00 PM
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Location: Cochrane, Alberta
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Default Re: If you had the chance to rebuild your oven, what would you change?

On a similar thread, one thing that I did that I really like and get rave reviews for is I found and old wall mount bottle opener and I screwed it onto the forno. Everyone comments on it and it gets regular use during any of our get togethers.....
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  #117  
Old 08-19-2013, 02:04 PM
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Cool Re: If you had the chance to rebuild your oven, what would you change?

Just want to post here to bring this thread back to the top for awhile. Really good points in here to consider for the class of 2013 and beyond and it was hard to find this thread.

For me, I would use homebrew and save $$ and probably build a smaller oven. 36" takes awhile to get to pizza temp. The size is great, but i think a smaller would heat faster and get used more. Not sure, just wish i had time to use it more.

Texman
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  #118  
Old 08-19-2013, 02:47 PM
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Default Re: If you had the chance to rebuild your oven, what would you change?

A smaller oven doesn't mean faster heat up because a smaller oven has a smaller fire. It is the thickness of the walls and their conductivity that govern how fast it will heat. My oven is only 21" and has 2" walls, it still takes an hour to clear and an hour and a half to get to proper pizza temp. If I'm cooking for a big crowd I'll give it two hours of fire.
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  #119  
Old 08-19-2013, 02:57 PM
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Post Re: If you had the chance to rebuild your oven, what would you change?

david s

That is about exactly what my oven prep times are. Takes 1.5 to two hours to clear. Not sure what a complete saturation is just yet and not sure how to tell. So it just takes a while to get them to temp for pizza whether small or larger. More mass=more time but more retention. For some reason i had it in my head the smaller ovens were quicker to heat. Thanks for the clarity.

Texman
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Last edited by texman; 08-19-2013 at 02:58 PM. Reason: spell
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  #120  
Old 09-04-2013, 08:44 AM
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Default Re: If you had the chance to rebuild your oven, what would you change?

Time. I would change time. As in give myself more of it. I definitely did this oven with one eye always on the clock. I rushed it and it came out sloppy. Not what I intended at all.

Ok this was my first and in no way a permanent oven for me but a favor to my landlord. When its time to leave in 3.5 years she gets a brick oven with some years still left on it.

This was a practice oven to show me what I would do wrong. And the biggest mistake was time and lack of patience.
Next oven I will shape and form every chain of bricks, Build a jigsaw from scratch. Make it pretty. And do it somewhere outside of China where I can buy bricks of uniform size and quality, not the hodgepodge I got to work with.
But that is it, what I would change first, TIME.

BC
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