Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/)
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-   -   Fire size (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f28/fire-size-2243.html)

BHunter 07-11-2007 11:52 AM

Fire size
 
Is there an ideal size of a fire that should be created in a 36" oven?

DrakeRemoray 07-11-2007 11:58 AM

Re: Fire size
 
It takes a big fire to heat it up. Lots of threads on this. Try reading threads here:
http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f16/

Dutchoven 07-11-2007 01:46 PM

Re: Fire size
 
Big fire! Definitely yes. Don't overload the fire in the beginning, once it is going good with kindling and small stuff ad the firewood in small groups(1,2 or 3 pieces a time). The more brightly the fire burns the faster you should get up to cooking temps.
Dutch

BHunter 07-11-2007 02:57 PM

Re: Fire size
 
Dutch, thank you. As far as "wood size"... shoould I be chopping my wood in normal wood stove pieces or smaller?

BHunter 07-11-2007 02:57 PM

Re: Fire size
 
I mean like I can build a FIRE!!!

enz 08-06-2007 03:23 PM

Re: Fire size
 
I finally managed to overload my 42 incher. I could see that the back wasn't burning right, so I split the front of the fire to the sides and the back went up like a plane crash. It had been pre-heated but starved of oxygen. Pretty impressive. Getting air to the back of the fire is critical to an efficient burn.

Enz

Dutchoven 08-06-2007 03:46 PM

Re: Fire size
 
B I have been able to get my hands on some sawmill slabs...nice dry pieces off the sides of the trunks that can't be used for lumber. they have lots of flat sides and usually no bark...they burn great and if you get oak they burn really hot. Diameter I prefer would be in the 2 to 3 inche range for well seasoned. Smaller if it is still holding some moisture.

Enz Be careful when you split it like that...it gets really hot really quick...no danger to the oven but there is danger to your arm. Don't forget that when they used the old ovens(middle ages) they simply loaded the oven with "faggots" of tree branches and then lit the fire in the front. The fire then burned its way back in the search for fuel and brough the oxygen with it. Once you have a good fire burning you can load the bakc and sides pretty heavily and the fire will care for itself. I fire mine for baking around 8 PM for the next mornings bake and just before bed I load that oven up with wood and cut the draft by 50% using firebricks. Down to coals in the AM and can hold 450 plus for about 7 hours.
Best
Dutch

Les 08-06-2007 04:06 PM

Re: Fire size
 
It appears that bigger is better. They have been refered to as "hell in the hole" and Robert probably said it best;
"a big fire is inadequate. you need a "frightening" fire"

Les...

BHunter 08-07-2007 05:53 AM

Re: Fire size
 
Guys, thanks again. I see that size DOES matter... as well as timing!


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