#21  
Old 06-17-2010, 09:01 AM
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Default Re: Casting Refractory - This is NOT a drill!

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Originally Posted by enz View Post
3) Manifold your flu properly. In other words, make a nice lead in from the arch to the flu for better flow. I just had a square corner and have a little smoke come out of the front of the oven. To solve this, I made a stainless steel door that is open at the bottom and forces the smoke up the flu. As a bonus, the air that gets sucked in the bottom is blasted straight into the fire and helps the heat up immensely. I will make one for the new oven that I am building at our new house.
Glad to hear your oven has been performing flawlessly and to expectations over the last several years.

Are you able to post a photo of your manifold and the mods you made? If not, no problem...

Thanks a bunch,

George
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  #22  
Old 06-17-2010, 09:36 AM
enz enz is offline
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Smile Re: Casting Refractory - This is NOT a drill!

George,
We sold the house and so can't take a pic, but I'll try to describe it in more detail.

The door is made from one sheet of .032" 304 Stainless Steel. The door is the shape of the arch at the front except the bottom two inches where it bends 90 degrees inward and goes all the way to the dome entrance. It has 2" aluminum feet to support it. The back left leg is 4 inches to the right to clear the thermocouple stand that goes in the doorway too.

I made a quick CAD model and attached a jpeg of it. At least I think I attached it.

Enz

Quote:
Originally Posted by fxpose View Post
Glad to hear your oven has been performing flawlessly and to expectations over the last several years.

Are you able to post a photo of your manifold and the mods you made? If not, no problem...

Thanks a bunch,

George
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  #23  
Old 06-17-2010, 09:42 AM
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Default Re: Casting Refractory - This is NOT a drill!

Thanks Enz! I see exactly what you did.....that is very clever.

George
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  #24  
Old 06-17-2010, 10:36 AM
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Default Re: Casting Refractory - This is NOT a drill!

The fibers are of such a small volume that the porosity they add has an insulating affect approaching zero. The porosity left over from excess water contributes more.

Mizzou Castable is a relatively dense, high alumina castable refractory that has very high strength and can take temperatures far exceeding what we would experience in a normal wood-fired oven. Heck, it would make a great lining for firing pottery and hold up for years.

If there are newer castable refractories out there with densities approaching a dry-pressed fire brick (low, high or super duty) and can withstand @ 2200 F. check them out - they would probably do very well as the hot face material in a wood-fired oven. I recall that AP Green had a series of castables that were referred to as flux vibrating castables that I would love to get my hands on! These were mixed with minimal amounts of water, would appear to be damp (not wet or dry) and would fail the 'ball in hand' test above (the handful would just fall apart and never stay together when properly mixed). The only way to cast anything with them was to use very high frequency vibrators immersed in the castable - and if the vibrator lost power when in the castable you'd rarely be able to get it out. Heck, right after vibrating you could walk on top of it and not sink in. VERY dense. But VERY susceptible to exploding on the first heat up. The material was so dense steam from any excess water had trouble getting out, building up pressure. A very slow initial heatup was required. But it would give you an extremely hard and dense lining. Heat storage capabilities were right there with brick! And the cost was about 1/3 lower than Mizzou Castable.

I would suggest that home owners look into adding Mineral Wool to the list of insulating materials. At our temperatures, the insulating properties are fantastic!! Even when compared to ceramic blanket. I would still put a layer of ceramic fiber (paper or blanket) against the dome as extra insurance for where ever a dome cracks (they all will but not cause any structure issue). But right after that, a good 2 - 3 or 4 inches of mineral wool! That would help keep heat loss through the dome down a lot, keeping more inside the hot-face lining and inside the oven.

Last edited by altamont; 06-17-2010 at 10:41 AM.
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  #25  
Old 06-18-2010, 06:12 AM
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Default Re: Casting Refractory - This is NOT a drill!

I referred to a group of castables AP Green had manufactured. These were also referred to as "low cement" castable refractories. Do not let the "low cement" term scare you - these were extremely strong materials! Their impact and abrasion resistance were phenomenal too.
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Old 08-10-2012, 01:55 PM
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Thumbs up Re: Casting Refractory - This is NOT a drill!

Enz,

I am reading with interest your post on casting your own refractory bricks. I am in desperate need of refractory bricks for a 1956 oven I use. This oven uses cast ceramic elements attached to cast iron air/natural gas premix burners to heat laminating materials. Would you or someone you know consider trying to make these bricks for me. Know this is a strange request, but I am up thee proverbial creek without these bricks. Thanks.

Mike
mike@arvinyl.com
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