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  #11  
Old 02-26-2014, 07:34 AM
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Location: Pacific Northwest
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Default Re: Sea Salt

Seawater is a beautiful source of life and the proportions of ocean elements are similar to our own 'inner ocean' so to some salt crafters it is important to retain all of the 'stuff' as this results in a salt that is more simpatico with the basics of how we are actually composed.

Interestingly there is actually a law here that food grade salt must be comprised of a certain percentage of sodium chloride which means beautiful raw sea salt (85.6%) cannot be sold as a 'food' which it in fact is... it nourishes you with all kinds of trace elements when harvested from clean waters.

When you make solar or evaporated salt there is indeed a profile where various elements do precipitate at different brine concentrations and many commercial sea salts are not 'complete'... part of that is taste preference... but I think the more complete salts can have a greater complexity of taste depending on how you let them crystallize.

Pure sodium chloride from the ocean will crystallize in little pyramids not the little building blocks of land salt... in my process the salt comes out in layers like the pages of a book so it makes a good finishing salt... but I do pour off the bitterns (the last liquid at the end of the process as it is indeed very bitter) as taste is a priority with me... but I am still not within the parameters of the salt laws... guess I am a bit of a salt outlaw.
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  #12  
Old 02-26-2014, 01:56 PM
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Default Re: Sea Salt

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie M. View Post
When you make solar or evaporated salt there is indeed a profile where various elements do precipitate at different brine concentrations
So if you see needles of gypsum (calcium sulphate) do you just break em up a bit and keep evaporating?
I'm going to try this, but the missus has already laid down the law and said I must drive down the coast and gather my seawater from an area far away from heavy industry, so it might be a while.
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  #13  
Old 02-26-2014, 03:08 PM
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Thumbs up Re: Sea Salt

Yes, I agree, I don't that sea water from the Port River or the North Arm would be desirable. Taste ???? impurities ???? contaminates ???? but really, in such small quantities for a pizza, (as distinct from commercial quantities) would they really be dangerous?
Gee, I have had a lot of things ingested over my years and experiences that would be deemed unhealthy (e.g. working with asbestos, welding fumes, severe dirt/dust conditions, screen printing solvent/ink fumes etc.), but touch wood, at this stage seems to have unaffected me.


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  #14  
Old 02-26-2014, 03:12 PM
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Default Re: Sea Salt

Yes, that is one way to do it...

I am evaporating in glass pans... best not to use metal as the brine is so caustic it can leach things like chromium even from stainless steel. Here is my secret process...

Fill the pan with beautiful seawater... as it evaporates keep adding seawater I don't remember the exact percentage at which things start precipitating out but with 5 gallons of ocean I am using a 12x24 inch pan and the brine is about an inch deep the crystals start to form... now here is the technical part... when a crust of crystals form tip the pan so the brine flows over the crust and the crust will sink...repeat as necessary. I like this method because of the paper thin flakes that result.

At the end will be the bitterns and some calcium carbonate... you can go to the 'bitter' end if you want a complete salt or taste along the way to find your preference.

Also I am pretty sure a little bit of whale pee probably never hurt anyone...
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  #15  
Old 02-26-2014, 03:53 PM
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Default Re: Sea Salt

Annie,

Your salt is like the raw honey I get from my neighbor for letting him use a unused piece of my property for his hives. It is full of bee pollen and other "trace elements" that get nanofiltered out of the honey you buy at the local grocery store. Can I taste a difference? probably not, but I like to think I can.......as for your salt, like your oven, you can say, I made it myself!
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  #16  
Old 02-26-2014, 06:12 PM
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Default Re: Sea Salt

It might only bee an aesthetic difference but I think it is a difference that is important... wild bees ... wild salt ... they bring us a little of the precious sweetness of the natural world and a sense of our place in the big chaotic beauty of it all.
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  #17  
Old 02-26-2014, 10:54 PM
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Default Re: Sea Salt

Wild salt....margharita!
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