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  #41  
Old 04-11-2013, 02:19 AM
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Default Re: roasting green coffee beans

Hi Neill,

I've being home roasting coffee for a few years now and agree with what you're saying. If a person want to give it a try, in a very short time he will be able to do a decent roast in his WFO, all he has to do is allow the oven to cool to coffee roasting range. Now you sounds like me, obsessive. One of those who have gone up the ladder from, cast iron pot, modified popcorn popper, me to my behmor 1600, and you that home made monstrosity of your.
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  #42  
Old 04-11-2013, 04:53 AM
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Thumbs up Re: roasting green coffee beans

Hi Laurentius,

Quote:
that home made monstrosity of your.
That unique mechanical marvel is not a monstrosity, it is a work of art. When roasting, I note the temperatures on commencement, every 30 seconds and when first and second crack appears. I now use this data to improve on previous roasts with my version of a log. By playing with time and different temperatures, you can emphasise different subtle flavours within your roast.


Lacehim
Quote:
Consistency isn't everything when your homeroasting.
Sorry mate but I disagree. Rather than just having fun and producing a drinkable roast, you will want more of the better outcomes, especially when you have much better quality beans. Like you, I tried my first 2 roasts with $7/kg Indian beans which tasted quite nice, the $13 Kenyan AA Dorman beans are much stronger (but I prefer a darker rather than a mild lighter roast). Now I am blending my beans (roasted ones that are strong with those that are mild), getting a little more out of my lot!


Quote:
Your roast in the tray looked good, but in your close up your beans looked a bit oily.
Spot on BUT not burnt! In my notes on my roasting profile, I will reduce the time by 30 seconds!
At our pizza fests, we always finish now with home roasted espresso coffees which go down a treat.

Cheers.

Neill
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  #43  
Old 04-11-2013, 01:35 PM
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Default Re: roasting green coffee beans

Hi Neill,

Yes, it is a work of art, how long from concept to finished product? Is there a reason that you do not denote the time between 1st crack and second crack and time stopped. Smoke as a criterion?? That could be caused by an error bean in the wrong place of chaff burning, have you considered that. Roasting until surface oil appear is not a good thing, a sheen is different. Can you ramp up or slow down your temperature to modify the profile?
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  #44  
Old 04-11-2013, 03:50 PM
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Default Re: roasting green coffee beans

Piques my interest. I enjoy a good espresso but after the WFO, I dare not start another project for a while until I get some honey do's done.
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  #45  
Old 04-12-2013, 03:51 AM
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Thumbs up Re: roasting green coffee beans

Laurentius

Quote:
Yes, it is a work of art, how long from concept to finished product?
Once I collected the old bottle, outdated 1997, it only took a half day to cut the bottle in halves, (ensuring that it was totally empty and not likely to explode nor catch fire, but if I were to do it again, rather than cut it through the centre weld, I'd cut it around 40mm higher), weld on the hinge brackets, using a hole saw, cut holes in the base for air ventilation and to protrude the gas ring, cut and fold the basket and handle then bend, drill and weld the basket supports. The only other task was to drill and tap the top brass ex-valve to hold the thermocouple, (this was later lowered to beside the rotating basket.

Quote:
Is there a reason that you do not denote the time between 1st crack and second crack and time stopped.
There seems to be no distinct lull between 1st and 2nd crack, so that is where time and temperature control is important. By putting in the side of the basket a patch of woven stainless steel wire mesh to visibly see the bean colour is so important because if I lift the lid, then a lot of the heat escapes and becomes uncontrollable!

Quote:
Smoke as a criterion??
This is my best indication of roast done! The first sign of the blue smoke means all over and cool beans immediately. There seems to be no smoke from the burning chaff that I can detect but see the ash falling out of the basket and through the gap of the 2 bottle halves.

Quote:
Can you ramp up or slow down your temperature to modify the profile?
That is why the recording and time/temperature determination for my ideal roast is so important for consistency. The making of a new drum/basket with larger holes and thicker material, 1.6mm (16g) allows more chaff to escape and burn, also easier to weld and hinge, BUT being heavier, draws more heat out of the dome and takes a little effort to maintain the required.desired temperature.
I can remove the basket from the roaster and dump the contents into a large thick aluminium roasting pan in less than 20 seconds and then float the lot in a shallow sink of cold water, bringing the beans to room temperature in a minute or so. Just looking for a small battery (or even 12v motor to rotate the basket/drum, but unlike a rotiserie, I want at least 30-60 rpm rather than the 3rpm average of rotators. A windscreen wiper motor is looking good but I would prefer a small battery unit rather than a 240v transformer reduce to 12v set up.

Cheers.

Neill
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  #46  
Old 04-12-2013, 09:51 AM
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Default Re: roasting green coffee beans

Sounds like quite a contraption Neill, but with all that work, I have to say that my Behrmor is looking like a pretty efficient investment

I do love having home roasted beans though.

For those of us in the US, check out Sweet Maria's as a source for beans.
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  #47  
Old 04-12-2013, 11:20 AM
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Default Re: roasting green coffee beans

Quote:
Originally Posted by deejayoh View Post
Sounds like quite a contraption Neill, but with all that work, I have to say that my Behrmor is looking like a pretty efficient investment

I do love having home roasted beans though.

For those of us in the US, check out Sweet Maria's as a source for beans.
Hi Dee,

I'll have to agree with you, our Behmor is a far superior and efficent machine and probably cheaper. I live in and still get my beans from Sweet Maria's.
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  #48  
Old 04-12-2013, 12:03 PM
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Default Re: roasting green coffee beans

Quote:
Originally Posted by nissanneill View Post
Laurentius



Once I collected the old bottle, outdated 1997, it only took a half day to cut the bottle in halves, (ensuring that it was totally empty and not likely to explode nor catch fire, but if I were to do it again, rather than cut it through the centre weld, I'd cut it around 40mm higher), weld on the hinge brackets, using a hole saw, cut holes in the base for air ventilation and to protrude the gas ring, cut and fold the basket and handle then bend, drill and weld the basket supports. The only other task was to drill and tap the top brass ex-valve to hold the thermocouple, (this was later lowered to beside the rotating basket.



There seems to be no distinct lull between 1st and 2nd crack, so that is where time and temperature control is important. By putting in the side of the basket a patch of woven stainless steel wire mesh to visibly see the bean colour is so important because if I lift the lid, then a lot of the heat escapes and becomes uncontrollable!



This is my best indication of roast done! The first sign of the blue smoke means all over and cool beans immediately. There seems to be no smoke from the burning chaff that I can detect but see the ash falling out of the basket and through the gap of the 2 bottle halves.



That is why the recording and time/temperature determination for my ideal roast is so important for consistency. The making of a new drum/basket with larger holes and thicker material, 1.6mm (16g) allows more chaff to escape and burn, also easier to weld and hinge, BUT being heavier, draws more heat out of the dome and takes a little effort to maintain the required.desired temperature.
I can remove the basket from the roaster and dump the contents into a large thick aluminium roasting pan in less than 20 seconds and then float the lot in a shallow sink of cold water, bringing the beans to room temperature in a minute or so. Just looking for a small battery (or even 12v motor to rotate the basket/drum, but unlike a rotiserie, I want at least 30-60 rpm rather than the 3rpm average of rotators. A windscreen wiper motor is looking good but I would prefer a small battery unit rather than a 240v transformer reduce to 12v set up.

Cheers.

Neill
Hi Neill,

I feel that if there is no lull time between 1st and 2nd crack, that you do not have sufficient control of the beans profile. With any given bean you should be able to roast it during 1st crack to(City, City+ or Full City, just before 2nd crack), after the onset of 2nd crack, you should be able to obtain(Full City+, Vienna, and French roast), when you see divots or crater in your beans you have passed the natural profile of the bean. Smoke is an indication of the beans sugars are being burned off, not an indicator that the beans are done. There are many coffees that are excellent at a few seconds of 1st crack, even some espresso blends need not to go dark. Don't you think that if your beans were rotating a 30-60 rpm, that the centrifugal force would move the beans as a solid mass and not in the tumbling random fashion needed to roast each bean, more or less uniformly?
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  #49  
Old 04-12-2013, 12:55 PM
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Default Re: roasting green coffee beans

I think Vienna Roast = small charcoal briquettes

Full city+ is about the furthest I find I it reasonable to go without obliterating the characteristics of the bean

there is a really nice pictorial guide to roast levels on the sweet marias site

A Rough Pictorial Guide to the Coffee Roasting Process
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  #50  
Old 06-24-2014, 06:46 AM
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Default Re: roasting green coffee beans

Hey there, I'm a total noob lurking on the internet who has never used a wood oven or roasted coffee in his entire life, but I think you're all doing this completely wrong and are "wasting" your time building beautiful and ingenious but ultimately unnecessary rotisseries. Is what I'm about to say stupid? (sure sounds like it after that sort of introduction!) Has anyone tried it?

It seems like everyone just looked up how to roast coffee and is trying to replicate commercial coffee roasting procedures inside their oven whereas the process should actually be quite different as the heat is being applied in a different way. Rather than blindly copying how coffee is roasted in a commercial roaster we should reconsider the process as best suited to a wood oven.

The whole idea of moving the beans about is to get an even roast and the whole idea of having a high thermal mass, insulated wood-fired oven is to get nice, even heat. Why not just completely remove the coals, spread the beans out over a flat, thin mesh tray (raised off the oven floor using the thinnest mesh possible with gaps that are wide, but just small enough that the beans don't fall through) so they don't touch each other and "shade" each other from the radiant heat and just let the oven do its job of even cooking? Commercial roasters have to agitate them or blow hot air as they have uneven heat and need to move the beans, otherwise they would burn. All their complicated procedures are just trying to get that even heat and temperature control that your oven already has and putting the coffee beans inside a metal rotisserie inside the oven is actually taking a step backwards-the metal rotisserie re-creates uneven heat and so you have to turn it to try to even the heat back out - the only problem it solves is one it creates! Obviously if you put the beans in a heap or pile it wouldn't work at all since the ones on the outside would get all the heat and burn but if they are spread out it should actually work better than a complicated rotisserie system, right? It seems like oven roasting procedures are better for a wood-fired oven and you wouldn't have the problems with smoke and uneven roasting that usually make oven roasting a less-than-ideal option.

Can somebody explain to me why that wouldn't work? Has anyone tried it that way? Seems like a no-brainer to me but I can't try it myself as I still haven't built that oven...

- le frenchman arrogant
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