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  #11  
Old 08-29-2013, 06:19 AM
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Default Re: Cooking with Chip & Ann

Part two,

Making the Curds and Whey


This recipe assumes you are making up one gallon of milk. Doubles or triples well with same ingredient ratios.


Add 1-1/2 tsp. citric acid and 1/4 cup of the bottled water to one of your measuring cups and stir until dissolved.

Add 5 drops of rennet and 1/4 cup of the bottled water to the other measuring cup and stir well.

Place your large stainless pot on the stove, add your gallon of milk, and stir in citric acid solution.

Turn on stove to medium heat and stir slowly until temp reaches 88-90 F.
Turn off stove and remove pot from heat.

You may want to have a clip that holds your thermometer to the side of the pot for convenience.

This step is critical....
Stir rennet solution into milk for 30 seconds and cover pot and let it sit undisturbed for 15 minutes.

Do not stir any longer than 30 seconds, it will interfere with the combining of the curd.

After the 15 minute wait, the curd and whey should look something like the photo, a very soft jello like material suspended in a clear light yellow liquid.

If the curd looks more like cottage cheese floating in yellow liquid then get yourself better milk, milk that produces chunky curd will still work but the milk you have is not ideal.

Cut the curd with the long knife in a 1 inch checker board fashion (sending the knife tip all the way to the bottom of the pot)

Return the pot to the stove on medium heat until it reaches 105-110F.
You will need to stir the pot very gently during this heating cycle.

Once the temp has been reached remove from heat and stir gently for another 5 minutes.

Now, take your slotted spoon or strainer and remove as much of the curd as possible, placing the curd into the colander and drain well

The whey should be collected in a clean bowl under the colander if you want to make ricotta from the whey.

If you are just discarding the whey pour it near your tomatoes they like it.

If you wish to save the curd for future use package it in zip lock bags and freeze.
Remove as much air as possible from each bag and leave about 1 tbs of whey in each bag to keep the curd from freezer burning.

If you have a vacuum packer this would be ideal.

I package my curd in 4 oz. packs in zip lock snack size bags, as that is a good size for my wife and me.

Next episode, turning curd into Fresh Mozzarella...
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Last edited by mrchipster; 08-29-2013 at 06:49 AM.
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  #12  
Old 08-31-2013, 05:27 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Tochigi Prefecture, Japan
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Default Re: Cooking with Chip & Ann

I just saw your thread, what a great idea!
Now we have a forum that is really interesting to follow!
I just glanced but I will go back and look at the recipes closely--I love good tasting things! If I cannot get the wife to do them--I'll try on my own--I am just that stubborn. Worse than that is...if it doesn't come out perfect, I'll eat it anyway and try it again and again until it resembles the photo.

Thank you for sharing your lifestyle with us dummies.

I'll keep watching--!
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  #13  
Old 08-31-2013, 05:41 AM
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Default Re: Cooking with Chip & Ann

Just a note!

My neighbor Yoshida is a dairy farmer...Milks 200 cows a day! I can get fresh, like right out of the cow anytime--any day...milking is at 4AM and 4PM.
He has one of those fancy milking parlors... I think two people do about 20 cows at a time. Each cow is identified by number and their production is noted each milking.

So cheese making is a real possibility! Everything he produces is picked up twice a day. But 5 gallons plus or minus would not be missed!
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  #14  
Old 08-31-2013, 07:12 AM
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Default Re: Cooking with Chip & Ann

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikku View Post
Just a note!

My neighbor Yoshida is a dairy farmer...Milks 200 cows a day! I can get fresh, like right out of the cow anytime--any day...milking is at 4AM and 4PM.
He has one of those fancy milking parlors... I think two people do about 20 cows at a time. Each cow is identified by number and their production is noted each milking.

So cheese making is a real possibility! Everything he produces is picked up twice a day. But 5 gallons plus or minus would not be missed!
I live in the city so getting milk from the cow is out. You will need to try the FM recipe and let me know how it turns out. I have a 4 gal. pot so. I will often make up 6 gal. Of milk into curd for later use. 6 gal. Ends up being about 8-9 pounds of curd. The two 3 gallon batches take me about 2 hours with ricotta making and clean-up.

Nice to see We have a follower.
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  #15  
Old 09-01-2013, 08:49 AM
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Default Re: Cooking with Chip & Ann

Part 3:

Turning your curd into Fresh Mozzarella.

For your first attempt at turning curd into Fresh Mozzarella place 4 oz do curd into a microwave safe bowl.

Sprinkle the curd with a scant 1/2 tsp of table salt. You may want to adjust the amount of salt for various recipes and your personal tastes but this is a good starting point.

Microwave on high for 20 seconds.

Remove from microwave and drain off any excess liquid by gently pressing with a silicone spatula or the back of a large spoon.

Treat the curd gently by pressing and folding it.

Return the curd to the microwave for another 20 seconds.

Repeat the press and drain to remove excess liquid.

Repeat these microwave drain and press and fold sequences until you begin to see the curd become smooth and shiny.

At this point you may want to put on some thin plastic or latex gloves to protect your hands from the heat.

Pick up the curd (now becoming cheese) and stretch and fold it gently and slowly.

Return to bowl and microwave again for 10-20 seconds if it begins to cool.

You can repeat this until the chees becomes the consistency you desire. The more cycles you go thru the more like string cheese it will become, I typicaly stop stretching after the second stretching session as I like my chees softer with more moisture.

The more you stretch it the dryer and tougher it will become.

Now take a piece of stretch plastic wrap, place the ball of cheese on the wrap, pull up the corners and twist into a ball, place the ball of wrapped cheese in the refrigerator or run cool water over the wrapped ball to firm it up.

Or better yet.... Eat the warm cheese..Yumm.

Next post will be "Turning frozen curd into Fresh Mozzarella."
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  #16  
Old 09-01-2013, 12:48 PM
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Default Re: Cooking with Chip & Ann

Just glancing at your thread this morning.

Do you have any alternative method for working the cheese instead of using a microwave?

At one time, I had multiple microwaves. One for my truck to warm meals, another for my office-same reason, and another in the house that had convection and regular bake options. I read somewhere about the how "micro wave" frequency alters the characteristic of the item being heated and since then disposed of or donated all these to other non-believers in the dangers of microwave.

The article was an obscure publication about the Soviets experimenting with microwaves for heating meals for their soldiers--then the experiments stopped because of dangerous effects. later some person publishing something in Europe on the same topic and appliance manufacturers forcing him to stop his claims ---the whole thing went to court and the scientist won the court action--but still not much is publicized on the topic. Microwave oven manufacturing world wide is a "HUGE BUSINESS". So instead of using ours, we changed back to things like heating on the stove, toaster oven, or a steamer.

I'm not a whacko, or at least I don't think I am! But a whacko would not recognize a whacko anyway so who knows?

Back to the question--any other way to accomplish the same thing without the microwave oven??

Also, I am storing all this information up and filing it in the things to try next file--next to the other lists--like log splitter, woodshed, oven complete, solar panel installation, building a compost structure, polycarbonate roof over another section of garden.... so I'll be coming back to this topic and watching your thread with interest.

Good thing you can type quickly--makes for interesting reading!
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  #17  
Old 09-01-2013, 02:20 PM
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Default Re: Cooking with Chip & Ann

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikku View Post
Just glancing at your thread this morning.

Do you have any alternative method for working the cheese instead of using a microwave?

At one time, I had multiple microwaves. One for my truck to warm meals, another for my office-same reason, and another in the house that had convection and regular bake options. I read somewhere about the how "micro wave" frequency alters the characteristic of the item being heated and since then disposed of or donated all these to other non-believers in the dangers of microwave.

The article was an obscure publication about the Soviets experimenting with microwaves for heating meals for their soldiers--then the experiments stopped because of dangerous effects. later some person publishing something in Europe on the same topic and appliance manufacturers forcing him to stop his claims ---the whole thing went to court and the scientist won the court action--but still not much is publicized on the topic. Microwave oven manufacturing world wide is a "HUGE BUSINESS". So instead of using ours, we changed back to things like heating on the stove, toaster oven, or a steamer.

I'm not a whacko, or at least I don't think I am! But a whacko would not recognize a whacko anyway so who knows?

Back to the question--any other way to accomplish the same thing without the microwave oven??

Also, I am storing all this information up and filing it in the things to try next file--next to the other lists--like log splitter, woodshed, oven complete, solar panel installation, building a compost structure, polycarbonate roof over another section of garden.... so I'll be coming back to this topic and watching your thread with interest.

Good thing you can type quickly--makes for interesting reading!
Patience is a virtue grasshopper, I will get there in good time.
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  #18  
Old 09-02-2013, 01:36 AM
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Default Re: Cooking with Chip & Ann

Hey Chip I'm enjoying this thread. It's great to see what people cook in their ovens.

I have been cooking my bread in a cast iron pot for a few years now and find it works really well.

I'm also interested in your home made mozzarella. My wife makes goats cheese and it is also great on pizza. She has a contact who supplies fresh, unpasturised milk and it really makes a difference.

Keep 'em coming.
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  #19  
Old 09-03-2013, 08:53 PM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: Cooking with Chip & Ann

Chip, This is really great info and much more pleasant reading than some of the goings on in this forum lately. Negativity can be a turn off and there's never any of that in your posts, only generous sharing of your knowledge. I did'nt realize mozzarella making was this involved. It's time to order wine yeast so I will add cheese supplies and give it a try. If its worth doing its worth doing right. Now I need to talk to my dairy farmer nieghbor about buying some "real" whole milk.
John
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  #20  
Old 09-03-2013, 10:39 PM
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Default Re: Cooking with Chip & Ann

Quote:
Originally Posted by silvfox View Post
Chip, This is really great info and much more pleasant reading than some of the goings on in this forum lately. Negativity can be a turn off and there's never any of that in your posts, only generous sharing of your knowledge. I did'nt realize mozzarella making was this involved. It's time to order wine yeast so I will add cheese supplies and give it a try. If its worth doing its worth doing right. Now I need to talk to my dairy farmer nieghbor about buying some "real" whole milk.
John
Hi old foxie,

Read this:What is raw milk?

You can go directly to the farmer and purchase it.

Last edited by Laurentius; 09-03-2013 at 10:42 PM.
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