#11  
Old 09-23-2005, 10:41 AM
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Exclamation If you "Construct walls around your oven" then, ...

#31

(M) I found the following quote from the Forno Bravo oven building instructions:

"Construct walls around your oven using metal studs to a height of at least 6" higher than the top of your insulated oven dome."

(M) I believe that Jim's first gabled house oven did not build the walls to that height, at least so it appears from the pictures on Yahoo. The advantage I see of using taller walls is that the builder can employ collar ties which would otherwise be obstructed by the top of the dome.

================================================== ===

(M) Thanks to both Bob C. and Tarik for their help. Tarik, you wrote:

(T) .... " ...I've considered is a wooden door with firebrick on the inside face."

(M) I can't visualize firebrick on the inside of the door. Would you use the thin split firebricks and attach them with some special adhesive? ____

(T) "The problem with installing a door is that you do have to leave enough room for airflow or you cannot use it with the fire in place (works great for after however, to help retain heat)."

(M) How would the open chimney vent affect air to the hearth when the door is closed? ____ Are you planning on a chimney? ___ If "yes", then would you install a "damper" valve near the top? Since your design is so similar to mine I am especially looking forward to seeing your pictures. Had I mentioned elsewhere that about 30 of my images can be seen at :

http://photobucket.com/albums/a318/marceld/?sc=1

(M) Your dome does appear a bit too flat but mine is perhaps a tad too high? ___ I will not be working on mine this weekend so that will give you a head start, Tarik, with the result that I can learn from you :-)

(M) btw I have been using the Lazy Susan to rotate my 8 vanes but I believe I'll have to stop using it as I work on the throat as the vanes will probably intersect to bricks there as I rotate that assembly.

================================================== ===

(B) "Pizza is just around the corner."

(M) I know but who wants to eat at "Domino's" ?

Ciao,

Marcel
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  #12  
Old 09-23-2005, 07:59 PM
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Default Consider a Photo ALBUM in addition to the existing images

#33

(M) This is a reply to James' post from a different thread but since it is about Photos, I thought I'd Copy-Paste his post and <insert> my thoughts:

(JB) "Is the Forum "Brick Oven Photos" working as a central repository of photos, or is limiting 5 attachments to a thread limiting."

(M) I don't feel limited with just 5 images. I can post more with a 2nd Reply if I want to.

"If it is limiting, I would be happy to research the best way to attach a more open repository to the Forum. Perhaps there is a way of linking threads to photos in the repository. I will look into it."

(M) Not limiting for me, but would you consider having a Photo "Album" which contains only the images submitted, and, if possible, references the original post but does not in itself permit posts? I believe that some weeks ago you considered not moving the photos from where they currently reside but making copies of them to post in an Album. An Album, such as seen on Yahoo or PhotoBucket doesn't admit text and as a result the images are fairly easy to follow chronologically-sequentially.

(JB) "In general, storage has become so cheap, I don't think we want to limit photos -- but rather want there to be more -- then, the issue becomes assessbility and organization."

(M) I agree. There is great information on this forum but it is not that easy to locate.

(JB) "My action item, and I will get back."

(JB) "In terms of threads, I am trying to make it easy for both Forno Bravo oven owners and Pompeii builders to share everything, in terms of oven siting, design, insulation, trim, finish, chimneys, etc."

(M) I definitely feel that the construction stages or phases are the best way to organize the Sub forums and that giving only the simple name of the Sub-Forum, e.g. "Pompeii Oven STAND", "Pompeii Oven HEARTH", "Pompeii oven FLOOR and DOME", "Pompeii oven VENT and CHIMNEY", "Pompeii oven for FORNO BRAVO PARTS" would get the forum members to more easily select the appropriate sub-forum.

(JB) "One idea would be to eliminate the Newbie section, and put the content there into the four installation forums. We would turn the Newbie section into an information only Forum, not for posting threads."

(M) Yes, that could be a way. I always wrestle with choosing between "Newbie", and "Getting Started". They both suggest a novice posting so would you consider consolidating those two? If you read the descriptions of what should be on those forums it is not all that clear which one is the right choice because the descriptions over lap.

(JB) "Just a thought. For now, let's keep the Forums the same, and see if we can tackle the photo issue."

(M) The way I have tried to tackle the image problem ( I do have an image problem ;-) is to post all of my photos on PhotoBucket. If anyone writes me about how I constructed, e.g., the Hearth Slab supports before the pour, I would tell them to go to image #14 at

http://photobucket.com/albums/a318/marceld/?sc=1

and then I would explain what I did, on the forum to which the question was addressed. But that requires an external URL. It would be so much easier if the link could be achieved from within this forum.

James

(M) You mentioned as a follow up that you hope to bring in the old photos from the Yahoo group into the Photo "Forum". If that can be done then it should be equally possible to bring all the Photos thus far, into this Photo ALBUM.

(M) I hope this is not viewed as a negative. You have Great forums with super input! It would be even better if the information and images posted here could be found more easily.

Ciao,

Marcel

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  #13  
Old 09-24-2005, 05:07 PM
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Default Great Progress Marcel

Your progress is coming along quite nicely, do you have a target date for completion?

Its been a few weekends since i have been able to make any progress on the monstrosity in my backyard. My neighbour has already come over in concern a few times ( i live right in the middle of the city) Wait till the smoke starts rising... I will be working on the block again tomorrow, rain or shine, and will have some good pictures by the end of the day. There are still many questions to be answered throughout the rest of the project, but I hope to have the pizza's ready for halloween. Wait till the kids see this one....

Steffen
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  #14  
Old 09-24-2005, 05:20 PM
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yeah, marcel. can't wait to see your oven completed. we'll have to get together sometime and see each other's ovens. i plan to (start to) finish my arch, vent, and wall framing this week. i've had a million things to do preventing me from finishing, but you and i are on the same deadline. RAIN!!!
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  #15  
Old 09-24-2005, 09:41 PM
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Wink For me finishing is not a goal but a process

#34

(M) Dear Steffen, and Paul,

Thank you both for your positive support. No, Steffen, I do not have a target goal for it's completion, though as Paul correctly points out, rain in the North West can place some serious constraints on this project. If it rains while I'm still working, I'll throw a tarp over the whole project.

(M) I hope this doesn't sound like I'm pontificating but I try to approach as much in my life as a process; I want the verb "building", and not the noun, "building" to be my motivating force. I've read some posts that allude to the cooking in front of an outdoor oven to be almost a Zen like experience. Others find the process of laying the bricks to be a calming and spiritual exercise. I'd like to be in that company. It is not easy staying focused in the "now" so although I may be speaking somewhat paradoxically, the "process" is my goal, I often think of the Beatles line, "Life is what happens when we're making other plans." I'm trying to strike a balance between judicious planning, and a perspective of "Carpe Diem" and at this stage of my life I find I need to favor "Carpe Diem". In an earlier posting I quoted a less sensitive teacher annoucing before an algebra test: "Plan your work, work your plan, fail to plan, plan to fail" so I appreciate the perils of a lack of foresight, but I think all of us need to be OK with the so called flaws we alone recognize in our work; but equally important is enjoying the process of building.

(M) WHEW ! You sure didn't expect to precipitate such a long winded monologue from your well intentioned support. I apologize if I lectured :-(
================================================== =====

(M) I posted a few more photos on PhotoBucket and I probably should explain why I asked my cousin to take those shots:

#40, and #41 show the angle iron over the throat-tunnel entrance because in an exchange I believe was between Robert & Jim, one of them, I believe it was Robert, left a drawing of the angle iron at www.cpsusa.com/ebay/angleiron2.jpg

and referred to it, I believe as either a Teepee, or a pup-tent orientation. It could also lay on one of it's 2" legs. Jim Hatch responded with a detailed explanation of an easier way to approach this phase. The 2 photos I listed on

http://photobucket.com/albums/a318/marceld/?sc=1

might serve to help someone visualize his or her options.

================================================== =

#42 shows a container with some lumpy powder in it. That powder is the silt resulting from numerous brick cuts. Someone else needed such fireclay and laboriously hammered brick chips to create it. I suggest that when you empty the water tray on your tile cutter, don't throw out the baby (chip powder) with the bath water. If you enlarge that thumb nail you will notice a pinch of that powder next to a fine gap I left between the firebricks. At some point I'll use that powder as a matching color base for a refractory mortar to fill that gap. And although "
I think all of us need to be OK with the so called flaws we alone recognize in our work" it's OK to correct them if it is easy to do.

================================================== ====

btw: Many may be asking, "Why doesn't Marcel put the pictures on this forum?" The answer is that I'm trying to practice what I preach. I feel that the Photos section is where photos belong and this Forum is "Sharing my Progress". I almost wrote, "Sharing my Process" ;-)

================================================== ====

(M) #44 shows the first 2 uncompleted courses, the Lazy Susan under the throat, a spray bottle to occasionally wet the bricks which get dry despite dunking, and the pink vanes of high density styrofoam on my truck.

(M) #45 shows the vanes inside the dome circumference and me adjusting the angle iron for the opening support.

(M) #46 shows why I will probably have to give up on the Lazy Susan. In order to be able to turn it, I needed to enlarge the first ring about 1/2". A close up view of this photo will show that the vanes extend over the pencil circle of 42" drawn on the fire brick. In order to have the opening where I want it, i.e. a 20" width line segment on an arc of the circle, I will have to give up turning Susan and just lay the bricks along the vanes.

Ciao,

Marcel
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  #16  
Old 09-24-2005, 10:21 PM
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your floor looks great, marcel. the herringbone pattern diagonally oriented should create no seam issues with tools, etc. good philosophy, by the way. it seems many people on here share an obsessive yet relaxed attitude maybe it takes to up and build a giant oven in your backyard.

i personally reccomend more vanes, as they become your form at the top to bear the weight of the bricks that will not free-stand. that comes a little sooner, i believe, than the point where your vanes close in enough to get them all.

Quote:
I've read some posts that allude to the cooking in front of an outdoor oven to be almost a Zen like experience.
i'm not sure if anything can possibly be performed in a zen-like manner in the span of 90 seconds...but i know what you mean.
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  #17  
Old 09-26-2005, 09:06 AM
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Macel,

Very nice pics! You're actually ahead of me, and I didn't get anything done this weekend for a couple of reasons:

1) I burned out my diamond blade on my grinder and don't yet have access to a tile/brick saw (although I'm considering renting one).

2) I have a TON of other things going on in my life right now.

I was intending on building the vanes out of techno-foam insulation which I already have, but instead I'll probably be taking a different approach to my interior form. Think wedding cake.

You guys are all great inspiration, and like you, I have a deadline that includes rain. Here in Boulder Creek, CA, we got 74 inches of rain last year, about the same as the Northwest (in a non-drought normal season). Our rainy season looms.. PLUS we want the oven reasonably well cured for Thanksgiving!

Well, pics and progress will follow over the next few weeks!

Regards,

Tarik
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  #18  
Old 09-26-2005, 12:00 PM
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Default Burning blades

When I was tearing out my bathroom a few years ago my plumber friend had me get a small fountain pump dumped in a 5 gallon bucket of water to use with a harbor freight (read disposable) 4 inch diamond cutting/grinder. We hooked it up to a GFI circuit since the saw was not designed for water use. Sure didn't win any safety awards but it made cutting the old tub/tile real easy.

For laying the tile I use my dads MK diamond saw. He is real anal about his tools, I am only half a$$ed. The box it came in looked brand new, yet I knew he has used the tool for 3 bathrooms, one entry way and one kitchen 5 years ago. His word of wisedom to me was set pump to wide open.

If you rent a concrete saw, not sure about tile, most rental places will put a digital micrometer on the blade before you rent it and again when you return it. Not only do they charge you for the use of the machine they also charge on the thousandths that you have used on the blade.

Word of wisedom on tile cutting - lots of water, go slow, wear eye & ear protection, watch where you put your fingers!
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  #19  
Old 09-26-2005, 12:30 PM
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Well, to be honest, I used the diamond blade on lots of other masonry cuttings tasks (concrete blocks and concrete) before starting to cut the bricks with it, and it was an el-cheapo special ($13.99). So it lasted MUCH longer than I actually expected.

My grinder is no throw away, it's a Milwaukee, so I don't want to get it too wet since it's not designed for it.. but... I intend to use a little water to slow the wearing out of the new blades I've picked up, and I may yet rent the brick saw I checked out at our local rental place for some of the more complex cuts I'm pondering. They don't charge for blade wear (for bricks), but the price for renting the blade is entirely separate than renting the saw.

Tarik
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  #20  
Old 09-26-2005, 12:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jengineer
When I was tearing out my bathroom a few years ago my plumber friend had me get a small fountain pump dumped in a 5 gallon bucket of water to use with a harbor freight (read disposable) 4 inch diamond cutting/grinder. We hooked it up to a GFI circuit since the saw was not designed for water use. Sure didn't win any safety awards but it made cutting the old tub/tile real easy.
You know, I have an old fountain pump in the basement. I should dig that up and see if it still works. Save my wife the effort of standing over me with the hose while I'm cutting (and save me from getting soaked due to my smart ass remarks that I cannot seem to repress).

Tarik
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