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  #51  
Old 09-18-2007, 03:35 PM
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Default Re: My Old Kentucky Dome

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Thanks!


Actually, I'm most worried about keeping this darn Kaowool insulation board dry. It's a pain. Even slightly damp and it gets a lot mushier than I'm comfortable with.
I have the same problem. I have bricks over my boards and when the dewpoint hits in the morning everything gets covered in moisture. Thats fine when the day gets back up to 90F but the boards that are covered in brick don't really get to see that heat, and so they stay moist. Well I was standing on the oven floor yesterday and the bricks would sink slightly into the board! This didn't happen when they were dry. So now of course I'm worried.
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  #52  
Old 09-18-2007, 05:30 PM
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Default Re: My Old Kentucky Dome

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I have the same problem. I have bricks over my boards and when the dewpoint hits in the morning everything gets covered in moisture. Thats fine when the day gets back up to 90F but the boards that are covered in brick don't really get to see that heat, and so they stay moist.
What kind of boards are you using? About two hours after finishing my soldier course today the sun dried everything out and the boards were again very rigid and sturdy.

I think that once the oven is finished out and protected from the elements, it won't be an issue. Any moisture that makes it's way into the floor from humidity will be driven off when the oven is fired. Once the dome is in place, we won't have anything heavier than an iron skillet or two on the bricks. Should be fine. Seems to be working for others!
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  #53  
Old 09-18-2007, 05:41 PM
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Default Re: My Old Kentucky Dome

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I'm placing a thin strip of flattened corrugated cardboard cut from a box between the soldier course and the edge of the floor bricks. This is so I get a nice clean gap for thermal expansion.
I used a 2í x 4Ē strip of vinyl from our old kitchen floor to achieve a clean gap - it worked a treat, but fortunately I was able to remove it and proceed to the next lot of perimeter bricks (I didn't lay a soldier course, and my perimeter bricks were level with the floor). A cardboard flavour is one thing ....

Rather than just let the gap fill up with ash (or more likely mortar from subsequent courses!), I filled it with dry firebrick dust from my brick cuts. Hopefully this will permit a little movement if it stays dry.

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... when the dewpoint hits in the morning everything gets covered in moisture.
I had the same problem before my floor went down - the Cal Sil sheets were covered with plastic sheet, but I overlooked the condensation factor. Result - the insulation sheets had a big moist patch in the middle of the floor area which was particularly difficult to dry (with a fan heater). To overcome this, Iíve since elected for a double layer approach - see pic. The tarp also lets me work on the dome in inclement weather.

Cheers, Paul.
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  #54  
Old 09-18-2007, 05:50 PM
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Default Re: My Old Kentucky Dome

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A cardboard flavour is one thing ....
Once the floor hits 700-800F I don't think cardboard flavour will be an issue
Anyway, I grew up with Italian delivery pizza in Philadelphia. The cardboard taste will bring back memories!

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Rather than just let the gap fill up with ash (or more likely mortar from subsequent courses!), I filled it with dry firebrick dust from my brick cuts. Hopefully this will permit a little movement if it stays dry.
I've thought about doing this very thing. But my cardboard in the crack should keep out unwanted mortar.

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To overcome this, Iíve since elected for a double layer approach - see pic. The tarp also lets me work on the dome in inclement weather.
I've seen several people with tarps. I might go to WalMart and get an inexpensive one. Seems like a good idea.
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  #55  
Old 09-19-2007, 04:15 PM
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Default Re: My Old Kentucky Dome

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What kind of boards are you using? About two hours after finishing my soldier course today the sun dried everything out and the boards were again very rigid and sturdy.

I think that once the oven is finished out and protected from the elements, it won't be an issue. Any moisture that makes it's way into the floor from humidity will be driven off when the oven is fired. Once the dome is in place, we won't have anything heavier than an iron skillet or two on the bricks. Should be fine. Seems to be working for others!
Aluminum Silicate boards. Yes after drying they are back to their original strength. I can put a brick on a board and stand on it w/o any deformation at all. I just have to be able to keep concentrated weight off of it while damp.
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  #56  
Old 09-19-2007, 04:17 PM
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Default Re: My Old Kentucky Dome

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Originally Posted by Hendo View Post

I had the same problem before my floor went down - the Cal Sil sheets were covered with plastic sheet, but I overlooked the condensation factor. Result - the insulation sheets had a big moist patch in the middle of the floor area which was particularly difficult to dry (with a fan heater). To overcome this, Iíve since elected for a double layer approach - see pic. The tarp also lets me work on the dome in inclement weather.

Cheers, Paul.
Good idea! The double tarp will also help me in the days to come since rain is likely to return.
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  #57  
Old 09-20-2007, 01:48 PM
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Default Re: My Old Kentucky Dome

2nd course of dome bricks cut and mortared. My angle cuts aren't quite as accurate as I would have liked. I didn't get the micron-sized joints some of the pros here are getting, but I still used a fraction of the mortar that would be required if I didn't cut. So that's a good thing, right?

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  #58  
Old 09-20-2007, 01:59 PM
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Default Re: My Old Kentucky Dome

Its hard to tell in the pic (kinda small on my monitor), but are your bricks tapered on all four sides?
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  #59  
Old 09-20-2007, 02:07 PM
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Default Re: My Old Kentucky Dome

You bringing sexy back!

Looking good.

Excellent work.


I hope i can do as well!
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  #60  
Old 09-20-2007, 05:56 PM
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Default Re: My Old Kentucky Dome

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Its hard to tell in the pic (kinda small on my monitor), but are your bricks tapered on all four sides?
My soldiers were tapered slightly (no calculation, I just cut a shallow angle on them).

The second course required 28.5 half bricks. I tapered the bottom and sides. The top, exterior and interior sides are untouched. The bottoms of the second course bricks are tapered so the interior side is closely aligned to my curved foam dome gauge (not shown in picture).

I'm pretty happy with the results... I'm giving the second course a grade of "B". I'm shooting for at least a B+ on the 3rd course
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Last edited by Ken524; 09-20-2007 at 05:59 PM.
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