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  #161  
Old 06-13-2013, 07:38 AM
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Default Re: My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio

John,
The roof pitch is 8.5/12

Thanks for the compliments.
Let me know if you need anything.
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  #162  
Old 06-13-2013, 06:35 PM
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Default Re: My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio

Thanks Todd.
I'm not finished with my oven yet, but I am starting to think about the enclosure and this information helps. I appreciate the quick response!
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  #163  
Old 06-15-2013, 01:52 AM
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Default Re: My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio

This looks like what I envision. I begin my build in three weeks and have several questions. Can I email you directly? Dave. Pettigrewdave123@gmail.com.
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  #164  
Old 06-18-2013, 02:26 PM
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Default Re: My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio

Hi Dave,
Where are you from?
I sent this to you an e-mail as well...

I've attached my build plans in .PDF for the floor layout & dimensions.

I'm 6'1". I used my elbow height as a starting point to plan down & build up from. I picked a height that was comfortable for me to use the oven tools, like the pizza feel, shovel, brush, etc...
From this height I designed down to determine height from the ground. I designed up from this height to determine total vertical height.
Since I went w/ the 42" design, I knew that the inside of my dome would be 21" (21" radius for the 42" diameter) from the oven floor height. The brick height can then be added to this 21" to determine total dome height, etc...

Here's a link to my build pics in full resolution:
http://www.toddboyland.com/Pizza_Ove...Resolution.zip

These higher resolution pics should help you see the jig a little better.
Look at the full resolutions pics 058 - 060, then 102 - 105.
Also go to page 6, 8, & 9 of my forum build for a description and where I got the design & more details for the wetsaw jig.
I've also attached the spreadsheet for the brick cutting angles. This can also be found in my build as well as mrchipster's.

If you want to do tapered, beveled cuts to minimize mortar joints, the jig in an absolute must...IMO.

Hope this helps.
Let me know if you have any other questions.
I put my phone # in the e-mail, if you have any Q's.
Thanks for the interest.
Attached Thumbnails
My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio-bevel-chart3.jpg  
Attached Files
File Type: pdf floor brick layout.pdf (40.9 KB, 128 views)
File Type: pdf Floor_template.pdf (37.0 KB, 122 views)
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  #165  
Old 06-19-2013, 06:16 AM
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Default Re: My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio

Hi Dave,
Answers to your questions...


I'm not an expert, but I would shy away from any products that are not refractory-specific.
Most of the refractory products can withstand 2400-3200 degrees F.
I do know of the insulation product that you're talking about, but I'm not sure of it's refractory properties.
Keep in mind that construction insulation is designed to prevent air moving between walls, refractory insulation is designed to retain heat.

I can't speak for others wishing they had more insulation...
But I can say that if my oven is 1000 degrees at night, from cooking, it will be 400-500 degrees the next morning, 12-14 hours later.
There will be 8-10" of snow on the roof in the winter, and not a drop of snow melts when the oven is 1000 degrees F.

So I'm very happy w/ how mine is insulated, but that is also based on the specific firebrick, ceramic fiber board, and ceramic fiber blanket that I used.
I bought the ceramic fiber board & blanket online.
I believe they ship internationally, but you'd have to check.
Let me know if you want the contact info, model #'s, pricing, etc...I saved all that info.

So to answer your question about the floor firebrick, I don't see the need to lay the floor bricks on end, I don't regret not doing it that way.
Your floor would be less uniform as well, since you'd have so many more joints.
I found that firebrick is not as uniform as you might think, so creating a level floor on edge might be a challenge.

I mentioned in my build that I might not use that FB board next time, instead electing to use the vermiculite.
This is due to the fact that the FB board cannot get wet & I spent a lot of time having to ensure it stayed dry as I was mortaring chains/courses above it.

It sounds like your layers would provide plenty of insulation, just make sure that your structural layer is below your insulating layer, if you separate them.
Are you following the FB Pompeii 110 plans?
It explains all this in the .pdf.
I just stuck to the plans throughout my build.
There are 2 versions, I believe the 2009 .pdf is the most recent.
I can send it to you if you like.

I suppose you could use a mitre saw if you were able to keep the bricks wet enough & the blade wet.
For me, this was just easier w/ a wet saw.
The firebricks need to be wet when cut.
It makes them cut easier, there is no dust, and the blades last longer.
I soaked each brick in a bucket until the air bubbles stopped coming out (2-3 min).
Hope this helps.
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  #166  
Old 07-14-2013, 07:23 PM
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Default Re: My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio

Todd, Did you build the foundation larger than the stand? The FB plans suggest a larger foundation than the actual "Stand". You used the cultured stone which doesnt need a brick ledge so my thoughts are the foundation could be the same size.
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  #167  
Old 07-15-2013, 04:36 AM
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Default Re: My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio

Hi GarnerAC,
You are correct.
I built my foundation w/ the same dimensions as the stand.
Unfortunately I didn't get take any pics of the foundation, but it's a continuation down from what you see in these stand pics.
With the cultured stone this worked fine, as you mentioned.

Todd B.


Quote:
Originally Posted by GarnerAC View Post
Todd, Did you build the foundation larger than the stand? The FB plans suggest a larger foundation than the actual "Stand". You used the cultured stone which doesnt need a brick ledge so my thoughts are the foundation could be the same size.
Attached Thumbnails
My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio-001-foundation-oven-base-complete.jpg   My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio-010-hearth-complete.jpg  
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  #168  
Old 07-28-2013, 05:32 PM
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Default Re: My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio

Hi Todd, I'm part way through a build using mostly your design. I'm about ready to cut the bricks for the inner arch. I have a 14 inch brick saw, but it seems a little difficult to cut the angles when the brick is on it's short side so I'm cutting through the 4 1/2 in. Did you have any tricks for this? I have got my 1/2 bricks ready to cut for the arch and the angle I plan to use is 1/2 of the side (2.5 / 2 = 1.25) divided by the outer radius of the arch (12.5 + 4.5 = 17). Then if I take the arc sin of 1.25/17 I get just over 4 degrees. How did you cut this angle? I have one idea of raising my saw table to give me the full blade of the saw available, but it still seems like a hard cut. Also, I noticed you beveled at least one of the edges of the inner arch, but I'm trying to figure out if you did it for appearance or maybe to make the path for the air to go out easier? Thanks so much for all your detailed posts.
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  #169  
Old 07-30-2013, 03:56 AM
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Default Re: My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio

Hi JohnT,
See the 2 attached pictures below.
I used a square scrap of plywood to ensure the brick length was square.
I then used a shim to prop up one side of the brick.
I would adjust the shim as necessary to give me the desired angle.
It's primitive, and I wouldn't want to make a whole dome like this, but it worked well for the ~20-30 inner & outer arch bricks I needed.

I started by trying to get the trig accurate, like you're mentioning.
After realizing that this was going to be too difficult w/ the inaccuracy of cutting brick on a wetsaw, I just started cutting them trial & error & dry-fitting them (see attachment 031).
This worked well w/ the form in place. I was able to visually see the line & ensure my grout lines would be parallel/uniform.

I had a 10" wetsaw, so I had to cut most of the cut w/ the brick standing vertically. Then flip the brick over to finish the small amount that the 10" blade wouldn't reach.
As hokey as this sounds, it was surprisingly easy to match up the angle and get a nice clean edge.
I don't suspect this will be a problem for you w/ a 14" saw.

Also, keep in mind that your inner arch will always be completely black w/ soot. You will never see it.
I know this is not much condolence @ this stage.
But I found the inner arch made me much more comfortable getting the outer arch looking good, which you will see, of course.

The bevel you see on the inner arch was a mistake.
It originally was for appearance.
I realized after the fact though that it made it very difficult to seal the doorway, if I ever chose to put a door in (which I haven't found a need for).
See the bevel in the attached pic 031, then look at the inner arch in 064.
I also messed up w/ the plywood form in pic 031.
I didn't give myself enough room to drop it down when done.
So I had to pull it out laterally, which caused the entire inner arch to fail and break.
I had heard that arch's have a ton of vertical strength, but very little lateral strength. I know know firsthand.
This ended up being a blessing because it allowed me to correct my beveled inner arch brick problem.
Don't make the same mistake; cut your form a couple inches short, then shim it up to allow for an easy removal straight down.
Hope this all helps.
Good luck & let me know if you need anything else.

Todd B.

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnt View Post
Hi Todd, I'm part way through a build using mostly your design. I'm about ready to cut the bricks for the inner arch. I have a 14 inch brick saw, but it seems a little difficult to cut the angles when the brick is on it's short side so I'm cutting through the 4 1/2 in. Did you have any tricks for this? I have got my 1/2 bricks ready to cut for the arch and the angle I plan to use is 1/2 of the side (2.5 / 2 = 1.25) divided by the outer radius of the arch (12.5 + 4.5 = 17). Then if I take the arc sin of 1.25/17 I get just over 4 degrees. How did you cut this angle? I have one idea of raising my saw table to give me the full blade of the saw available, but it still seems like a hard cut. Also, I noticed you beveled at least one of the edges of the inner arch, but I'm trying to figure out if you did it for appearance or maybe to make the path for the air to go out easier? Thanks so much for all your detailed posts.
Attached Thumbnails
My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio-117-method-cutting-angled-outter-arch   My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio-118-method-cutting-angled-outter-arch   My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio-031-inner-arch-1st-attempt-dry   My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio-064-5th-chain-mortared-place.jpg  
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  #170  
Old 08-01-2013, 11:48 AM
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Location: Meridian, ID
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Default Re: My 42" Pompeii Oven build, Northeast Ohio

Wow that is just great info and thanks for sharing all of the stuff you've obviously learned the hard way. I liked how you ground out the arch to make way for a course of dome bricks to make the transition easier. Did you just grind that out with an angle grinder after your arch cured?
Thanks so much for your help,
John
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